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D ISASTER SOS: H AITI A BDNN PANEL DISCUSSION NEOCON IN C HICAGO, J UNE 15 Atim Annette Oton Co-Founder, Black Design News Network (BDNN)

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Presentation on theme: "D ISASTER SOS: H AITI A BDNN PANEL DISCUSSION NEOCON IN C HICAGO, J UNE 15 Atim Annette Oton Co-Founder, Black Design News Network (BDNN)"— Presentation transcript:

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2 D ISASTER SOS: H AITI A BDNN PANEL DISCUSSION NEOCON IN C HICAGO, J UNE 15 Atim Annette Oton Co-Founder, Black Design News Network (BDNN)

3 C ONTENTS 1. How I/BDNN became involved? 2. BDNN EVOLVES 3. What is BDNN? 4. BASIC STRATEGIES 5. Meetings, Orgs and Information Gathering 6. HAITI – before & after (the Haitian Renaissance 7. Presentation by Haitian General Consul 8. Presentations by key US organizations 9. BDNNs initiatives – NOMA Boston, Choose Haiti

4 H OW I/BDNN BECAME INVOLVED ? - 1 STRATEGY ONE: CONNECTING THE DOTS TIMELINE Jan 12, 2010: THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE GROUND ZERO – ENGAGING AND CONNECTING THE DOTS - INITIATING NOMA Jan 13, 2010: SENT TO STEVEN LEWIS, PRESIDENT OF NOMA PLUS 35 PEOPLE – INCLUDING 10 AFRICAN AMERICAN FIRM OWNERS –CURTIS MOODY, PHIL FREELON ONE: Steven, I have 2 key suggestions: 1. I think a statement from NOMA and a press release calling black architects to consider to assist, volunteer, contribute funds to Haiti, Haitian organizations such as Doctors without Borders, YELE, FOLKAI, etc. 2. I would like to suggest that NOMA and Black Architects consider contacting USAID to see what help and assistance can be given to Haiti - based on the earthquake. The first priority seems to be a need for doctors but in times of crisis, and as the country goes forward, there will be a need for reconstruction, urban planning, development and architecture. Any thoughts, Atim Annette Oton

5 H OW I/BDNN BECAME INVOLVED ? - 2 STRATEGY ONE: CONNECTING THE DOTS RESPONSES: Re: Black Architects, NOMA and Haiti Earthquake From: Steven Lewis To: atim oton Brilliant. Can you draft something for me to use as the basis for such a statement? I have inroads at USAID, so can probably get it in front of the right folks, but am time-challenged right now. Any help would be great to expedite this important mission. thanks, Steve I agree with the two suggestions! Curt Moody I can recommend the organization Building Goodness out of Charlottesville. They have experience in design/build community work in Haiti, and in disaster recovery after Katrina on the Gulf Coast. They do not have plans yet but will post news here: At some point they will be looking for volunteers. Bryan Bellhttp://www.buildinggoodness.org/index.php/news/

6 H OW I/BDNN BECAME INVOLVED ? -3 OTHER RESPONSES Those of us who have done business with USAID and its associated agency ASHA (American Hospitals and Schools Abroad) might consider co authoring a letter to both agencies offering our assistance. While it is true that planning and development efforts logically follow some time after the rescue and retrieval efforts, the centuries of neglect of that country probably warrants a mammoth rebuilding effort akin to the Marshall Plan (or at the very least the Katrina effort). I will be in that part of the Caribbean for the next five days and will inquire of other practitioners what their plans of action might entail. Another idea is to utilize the services of our members who have specific experience with design in seismic regions. Thanks. Bill Stanley ATIM: INCLUDE SOMETHING LIKE THIS IN THE LETTER: Strength in NOMA is built through unity in the cause that created the organization. Our impact is felt when our organization wrestles with the dilemmas that face this nation AND THIS WORLD, particularly as they affect our profession. There is strength in numbers. By increasing OUR organization'S OUTREACH, we add strength to the voice with which we can speak against apathy, bigotry, intolerance and ignorance; against abuse of the natural environment; and for the un-empowered, the marginalized and the disenfranchised. Our resources are.... We bring..... Renee Kemp-Rotan

7 H OW I/BDNN BECAME INVOLVED ? -3 OTHER RESPONSES Atim, Following on the thought in Bryan Bell's earlier , Architects Without Borders and Architecture for Humanity are both groups that would have core initiatives to assist in this endeavor. We may even want to align ourselves with architect organizations in the Caribbean, e.g., Jamaica Institute of Architects, Barbados Society of Architects, etc. as well as organizations like OECS. Patrick Williams NOMA launches Service in Solidarity to join others in providing assistance to disaster- stricken Haiti...??? Steven Lewis - Sent from my iPhone Steven, 1. Can you move this paragraph before - About NOMA? In times of crisis, it is vital to come together and serve others in need. We are extremely proud of our colleagues at the American Institute of Architects, Architecture for Humanity and all of our sister organizations that moved to immediately place resources into action to offer assistance to Haiti. NOMA stands with them as we all endeavor to make a positive impact, now and into the future. Steve/Board/All: Here is same NOMA press release translated into French. Love/Peace/Out/Well done! Renee

8 RESULTS PRESS RELEASE Distributed by BDNN, in English and French – to 200 press and got about 35 write-ups. Committee on Haiti SIS Committee on Haiti created Initiatives on Haiti Service in Solidarity – Donated $10k for CHF International Activated Strategic Thinking and Responses Engaged with a role to get NOMA to the table with the decision makers in Haiti and in the US Core Focus – Getting Involved – socially, ethically and responsible

9 STRATEGY TWO: BDNN EVOLVES - 1 HOW WE EVOLVED? BEGAN AT A PANEL DISCUSSION AT NOMA Developed with a Knight Ridder NEWS CHALLENGE GRANT Piloting in the NYC metro area, BDDN will expand regionally across the US and around the world as a creative hive, a work-space hub for designers to develop projects, exchange ideas and share expertise across disciplines, without regard to geographic borders. This collaborative work space offers new ways to produce projects that benefit the public interest. These might include creating possible design solutions for sheltering the homeless in New York City, constructive solutions for recovery in New Orleans and other areas where natural disasters occur on a regular basis (the Caribbean, etc.) or a Sustainability Model for Lagos, Nigeria that could be investigated by a team of interdisciplinary designers. GRANT Submitted December 15, 2009

10 STRATEGY TWO: BDNN EVOLVES – 2 A WHAT IS BDNN? Black Design News Network' s fundamental objectives are to: BROADCAST: Black Design News Networks (BDNN) goal is to produce and broadcast local, global stories with content to, for and about underserved African Diaspora designers (African, African American, Caribbean, Hispanic) in Architecture, Interiors, Industrial, Product, Fashion, Graphic and Media Design via a web- based portal. WEB THE BASE: BDDN will identify black designers who infuse unique identity into creative culture and transform the aesthetics of dominant culture, via 4 web-based components: a.) a digital news bureau to broadcast ; b.) an online magazine to document the work ; c.) a digital design studio/ workspace to collaborate ; and d.) a digital library to archive exemplary design, education, practice projects that serves to promote the worldwide contributions of designers from the African Diaspora. MARKET + SELL IDEAS: BDNN will promote black design goods, services and ideas to the marketplace, par excellence and en masse. CREATE PARTNERSHIPS: BDNN will establish and maintain partnerships with the United Nations, USAID, American Institute of Architects, AIGA, Black Creatives, Black Interior Designers, Focus on Design, Organization of Black Designers, National Organization of Minority Architects, National Conference of Mayors, American Planning Association, Councils on the Arts, design firms, schools & organizations across the world.

11 STRATEGY TWO: BDNN EVOLVES – 2 B WHAT IS BDNN? Black Design News Network' s fundamental objectives are to: DEVELOP DATABASE: BDNN will create a minority designers database/correspondence series for data retrieval on issues, such as: structural racism, black aesthetics, new markets for global design; & online surveys to report the wealth of findings in this our new design research magazine. DISTRIBUTE NEWS+ PR: BDDN will improve the way news and information is distributed locally via a strategy of tagging content geographical and matching local audiences by partnering with designers, worldwide. PROMOTE NEW IDEAS : BDDN will increase the volume, quality and content of design news on various platforms (print, web, TV, mobile). This is a African Diaspora design brain trust WORK SHOP + SHARE: BDNN will become a unique place for designers to network, interact, think & create.

12 WHO IS BDNN? The BDNN team: Atim Annette Oton Nigerian-born, U.S. and British educated architectural designer, Atim Annette Oton is a cultural writer/publisher and entrepreneur, and co-Founder of the Black Design News Network. She was an Associate Chair of Product Design at Parsons School of Design from Born in Calabar, Nigeria where she spent her formative years before coming to the US to study architecture at the City College of New York in Harlem under the influential black architect Max Bond (who she later worked for) and the Architectural Association Graduate School in London, England. She returned to New York in 1994 to work with the architecture firm, Davis, Brody, Bond Architects and various other firms in New York. In 2000, she was part of the design team that won the African Burial Ground Interpretive Center. She also worked as an executive producer and design consultant on the Underground Railroad Experience, a cultural education website from ; and won an Independent Grant from the NYSCA on her work, the Black Hair Salon in In 2002 and 2004, she participated as a designer for the 3rd and 4th Annual Bridge Street Development Corporation's Bed Stuyvesant Design Showhouses. She has been a consultant to the Bronx Council on the Arts for its Artisan Institute, an innovative idea focused on micro-enterprise for craftspeople in the Bronx. Her design work has been published in Architecture Record, Design Build magazine, Design Architecture.com, Oculus and Blacklines magazine and exhibited at the Architectural Association, London, and in New York at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Institute for the Research on the African Diaspora in the Americas and the Caribbean (IRADAC), the Bronx Museum of Art and the City College of New York. She served as the editor- in-chief and executive vice president for Blacklines Magazine, a quarterly magazine publishing features on black designers in architecture, interior design, construction, development and the arts from and the Co-Organizer, Limitless Layers, Blacklines Second Conference, Design Showcase and exhibition, April 11-14, 2002 and Co-Organizer, Bridging the Gap between Education and Practice, Blacklines Architecture Conference, Design Showcase and exhibition, October 19-22, 2000.

13 WHO IS BDNN? The BDNN team: Renee Kemp- Rotan Renee Kemp-Rotan, Director, Capital Projects Mayors Office, Birmingham, Alabama; Former Chief Urban Design/Urban Development; Director Economic Development, Atlanta GA. B. Arch Syracuse, cum laude; MSUP Columbia U.; RIBA II Architectural Association, London. RKR, came to the South from London, New York, DC around 1996 to work for Corporation for Olympic Development, Atlanta and now oversees $175 million dollars of bond/non-bond construction projects for Birminghams Mayor. As a master of architecture/imagination, she consistently blends urban design, heritage, and media savvy design with economic development projects on a major scale. Her work on The Grand Egyptian Museum Competition, Cairo; Pullman Porter Museum, Chicago; Railroad Reservation Park, Birmingham; Fort Worths Evans Rosedale; Auburn Avenue National Civil Rights Street Museum, Atlantas First Aquarium Initiative with daring exhibition designs for Urban Sea Academy, ENN-Environmental News Network, and Re-creation of the River Nile prove her theory of African Americana: that strong urban heritage statements create major destination tourism dollars. She has served ten mayors of major American cites on issues of urban design, economic development and master planning (i.e. DC. NY, ATL, Bham.) She has directed more than 30 major master plans for predominantly African American communities over the course of her career. Kemp-Rotan was recently recognized by both Harvard University and Oxford University as a leading urban designer in their jointly published African American National Biography. References to her work reside in the archives of the African American Studies Center. Oxford, England and the W.E,B. Dubose Center on African American Studies at Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts.

14 STRATEGY THREE: LAUNCHING BDNN STRATEGY – 2010 BETA SITE – full site to launch December 2010 SOCIAL MEDIA – Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin ISSUE ORIENTED : DISASTERS INITIATIVES WITH DESIGNERS AND ORGANIZATIONS Developing a Partnership Strategy with Organizations Series of Grant Applications helped us develop the site focuses and perspective Applied for a Knight News Challenge Grant, Graham Foundation, MacArthur J- Voices, NYC Seed Start, etc

15 STRATEGY FOUR: BDNNS FOCUS DISASTER FOCUS DISASTER SOS: HAITI NEOCON – JUNE 2010 DESIGN IN THE DIASPORA NOMA BOSTON – OCTOBER 2010 DA BRONX SOS GRANT APPLICATION CITIES UNDER SIEGE GRANT APPLICATION CITIES UNDER SIEGE: Disaster in the Diaspora is an online publication led by members of Black Design News Network (BDNN) and victims of disaster to collectively investigate the impact of natural and made-made disaster in chronically underserved communities, worldwide. CITIES UNDER SIEGE will target citizens of communities of color suffering disaster: The Earthquake & Port Au Prince, Haiti; Katrina, The Flood & New Orleans; Blight & The Bronx; etc., using a web-based platform with social media and mobile technology to collect news about: existing pre/post-disaster conditions; benign neglect; existent v. non-existent early warning systems; effective v. dysfunctional emergency interventions; culture and crisis analysis in the Diaspora communities.

16 STRATEGY FIVE: ATTENDING MEETINGS ON HAITI AND MEETING THE DECISION MAKERS/FUNDERS - 1 Haitian Government Haitian people – in Haiti and across the Diaspora United Nations (UN) World Bank Clinton Foundation/Clinton Bush Foundation Inter-American Development Bank(IDB) Congress- in particular Yvette Clarke and Ed Towns in Brooklyn US Government

17 STRATEGY FIVE: ATTENDING MEETINGS ON HAITI AND MEETING THE DECISION MAKERS/FUNDERS - 2 France, Canada, South American and Caribbean Countries UNA-HAITI – Haitian American/Haitian Diaspora Organization Brooklyn International Development Trace Center (BIDTC) USAID Department of Commerce USTDA Department of Defense

18 STRATEGY FIVE: ATTENDING MEETINGS ON HAITI AND MEETING THE DECISION MAKERS/FUNDERS - 2 France, Canada, South American and Caribbean Countries UNA-HAITI – Haitian American/Haitian Diaspora Organization Brooklyn International Development Trace Center (BIDTC) USAID Department of Commerce USTDA Department of Defense OPIC

19 STRATEGY SIX: KNOWLEDGE IS KEY BDNN IS BECOMING CULTURE EXPERTS BDNN IS BECOMING THE PLACE TO GO FOR INFORMATION ON HAITI AMBASSADOR LESLIE VOLTAIRE REMINDS US NOT TO FORGET HAITI

20 HAITI A collection of information from January 12 Getting up to speed on HAITI

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22 THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESENTATION BY S.IM.A.C.T, INC. SOCIETE IMMOBILIERE, DAGRICULTURE, DE COMMERCE ET DE TOURISME SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS INVESTORS REAL ESTATE AGRICULTURE JOB CREATION : TOURISM & COMMERCE

23 HAITI THE LOST PARADISE

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25 CHANGING THE PANORAMA OF HAITI

26 C HANGING P ANORAMA OF P- AU -P

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29 DISRUPTION & LOSS OF LIVES

30 PEOPLE FULOF LIFE

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33 DAMAGING THE EXISTING WEAK INFRASTRUCTURE

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37 DESTROYING HOMES & MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS

38 THE SACRED PLACE OF WORSHIP

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42 THE RECOVERY: HAITIAN RENAISSANCE

43 THE HAITIAN RENAISSANCE INTERNATIONAL AID FOREIGN INVESTMENT DIASPORA PARTICIPATION

44 HISTORICAL FACTS ONCE THE RICHEST COLONY IN THE CARIBBEAN REGION IN 1950: ECONOMY RICHER THAN THAT OF THAILAND BIG AGRICULTURAL EXPORTER OF COCOA, COFFEE, SUGAR, RICE

45 HAITIS POTENTIALS UNTAPPED NATURAL RESOURCES LARGE, UNDEVELOPED LANDMASS IN THE CARIBBEAN REGION EMERGENCE OF A POWERFUL, WELL PREPARED DIASPORA LARGEST, YOUNGEST LABOR FORCE EAGER TO FIND WORK REAL ESTATE VALUE HAS KEPT PACE WITH THE REGION DESPITE ITS UNSTABLE PAST DOMESTIC TOURISM HAS REMAINED STEADY

46 HAITI GROWTH POTENTIAL SHARES SAME ISLAND WITH D.R. POPULATION : 9-10 MILLIONS, A SUBSTANTIAL PART OF THE ENTIRE CARIB- WORKFORCE TROPICAL CLIMATE WITH 1850 KMS OF SHORELINES, GREATER THAN THE D.R.(1350 kms) STRONG DOMESTIC TOURISM :600,000 per year

47 HAITI: BASIC FUNDAMENTALS FOR GROWTH MATURING DEMOCRACY ( FRAGILE ) PEACEFUL LOCATION : CARIBBEAN UNTAPPED NATURAL RESSOURCES (agro- industry, mineral exploration, industrial developments, telecommunication, transportation, massive housing developments, tourism) PROXIMATE DIASPORA LARGE & RELATIVELY CHEAP LABOR FORCE

48 US D EPARTMENT OF C OMMERCE S EMINAR A CCESSING M EDIUM TO L ONG T ERM O PPORTUNITIES IN HAITIAN RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT B ROOKLYN, NY - M AY 10, 2010 J EAN -S ÉBASTIEN R ICHÉ C ONSULATE OF H AITI IN N EW Y ORK

49 T HE J ANUARY 12 EARTHQUAKE IN KEY FIGURES More than 300,000 deaths, 300,000 wounded (thousand of amputees), 1.3 million refugees and homeless living in tent cities; 105,000 homes destroyed, 208,000 damaged, 1,300 educational institutions and 50 hospitals and health centers collapsed or unusable; Total losses and damage estimated at USD 7.9 billion or 120% of GDP lost in the dust and rubble. Highest cost of disaster ever for the 35 years since DALA method has been used; Economic activities in the devastated areas accounted for 85 % of the State revenues (FMI).

50 F ROM A TRAGEDY TO AN OPPORTUNITY V ISION AND PRINCIPLES FOR A BETTER AND STRONGER H AITI A fair, just, united, friendly and environmentally friendly society ruled by the law; a modern, dynamic, competitive, open and inclusive market-based economy; a society serving everybodys basic needs; a knowledge-based society built on a strong university system; A responsible, unitary state guaranteeing the implementation of the laws with a strong commitment to de-concentration and decentralization.

51 T HE C OURSE OF A CTION Two master documents: Post Disaster Needs Assessment (PDNA) and Action Plan for the National Reconstruction and Development (APNRD);Action Plan for the National Reconstruction and Development (APNRD); 3 interlinked phases of action to coexist with immediate or long- term impact (relief and prevention, rebuilding and laying the foundations for a sustainable development ) Actions oriented toward 4 sectors territorial rebuilding, economic rebuilding, social rebuilding and institutional rebuilding SITES TO VISIT content/uploads/2010/05/Action_Plan_En_FINAL_12April.pdf

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53 T ERRITORIAL AND ECONOMIC REBUILDING Cleaning and reconstruction of devastated zones(1000 heavy trucks for 1000 days); Preparation for the hurricane and disaster risk management; Building code and zoning code; Watershed management; National transport network : the highway network (600 km) ;

54 T ERRITORIAL AND ECONOMIC REBUILDING (2) A key concept : the 6 Regional Development Centers and 10 largest urban areas renovation (5 million people) National planning and local development; Basic infrastructures to renovate/build and maintain: roads, ports (including 2 deep-water), airports (2 internationals), telecommunications, water, sanitation (8 disposal sites), electricity with an emphasis on environmentally sound renewable solutions.

55 S OCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL REBUILDING Temporary and permanent housing; High-intensity labor jobs; Health care (30 new hospitals), food security and nutrition; Schools and universities; Justice and security; Re-launching the central administration; Regain a critical mass of qualified human resources with a new balance between capital – regions (20%- 80%);

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57 T HE M ACRO - ECONOMIC FRAMEWORK Before the earthquake, a converging and consecutive set of positive indicators: low inflation, steady growth, stable exchange rate; After the quake, some encouraging sign: exchange rate remained unchanged after a few days of volatility; Anticipated deterioration in especially the BoP and the budget deficit; general improvement projected from the medium term through 2015 supported by sound fiscal and monetary policy.

58 F INANCING THE N ATIONAL R ECOVERY AND D EVELOPMENT OF H AITI : T HE HRF O BJECTIVE To mobilize, coordinate and allocate resources to improve basic living conditions in Haiti and assist in building the capacity of the Haitian state and society in the longer term in a way that is consistent with Haitis Reconstruction and Development Plan and related initiatives

59 K EY HRF P RINCIPLES Government leadership Filling gaps in reconstruction finance Adhering to high quality standards Building on existing capacity Embracing good governance Acting with speed while managing risks

60 HRF A CTIVITIES Activities will be financed to achieve the HRFs objective including: Technical assistance and capacity building Infrastructure investments Delivery of basic services Community development Environmental protection and clean-up Job creation and income generation Budget support

61 F LOW OF HRF R ESOURCES

62 HRF C ONTRIBUTORS Confirmations of intent to contribute: Brazil, Canada, Estonia, Norway, Sweden, United States Australia, Caribbean Development Bank, EU, France, Georgia, Korea, Oman, Qatar, and Spain are considering contributions On March 31 at the UN, USD 5.5 billion pledged for and USD 9.9 billion until At present, only Brazil donated $55million Site to visit: World Bank - countries - Haiti XTN/0,,menuPK:338184~pagePK:141159~piPK:141110~theSitePK:338165,00.ht ml XTN/0,,menuPK:338184~pagePK:141159~piPK:141110~theSitePK:338165,00.ht ml

63 HRF G OVERNANCE Steering Committee Chaired by Government of Haiti Representatives of donors contributing at least US$30 million Representative of each partner entity (IDB, UN, World Bank) Representative of Trustee (IDA) Observers approved by Steering Committee

64 L INKS WITH THE G OVERNMENT Government-HRF links include: GoH chairs the HRF Steering Committee GoH endorses all proposals for HRF financing GoH would set standards for the recovery HRF will be an important participant in GoH-led donor coordination and policy dialogue Haiti Interim Reconstruction Commission (HIRC) is being established and will be a key partner for the HRF

65 N EXT S TEPS Interested donors agree on and sign Administration Agreement with IDA and transfer first contributions First Steering Committee meeting held in Port-au-Prince (May) Partner entities develop proposals Secretariat recruited First proposal concepts submitted (June) First disbursement (June/July )

66 F INANCING THE N ATIONAL R ECOVERY AND D EVELOPMENT OF H AITI : THE OTHER SOURCES Total long term financing needs estimated at USD 34 billion; Non HRF bilateral, multilateral, NGOs and international agencies; FDI; Local private sector. Guarantee funds to support credit facilities from banks and micro-credit lenders to rebuild houses and businesses; Haitian Diaspora innovative way to fuel productive investment.

67 S UCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENTING THE A CTION P LAN : A SMART AND DUTIFUL DIVISION OF LABOR Haiti has most NGOs per capita in the world after India (Pres. Bill Clinton, March ) International partners to fine tune the coordination of myriad of projects and avoid substituting to the GoH; Haitian private sector strongly committed to foster a large middle-class and a vibrant business climate driven by competition, innovation, inclusion; The GoH to define the strategic vision, to be the chief enforcer, to abide by the rules of transparency and accountability.

68 A FEW ADVICES FOR INTERESTED ENTREPRENEURS AND BUSINESSES Know the specificities of your market; The Haitian Diaspora : a reservoir of knowledge and know-who; Consider partnership with local firms; Strong Corporate Social Responsibility a plus; Excessively focusing on HRF as a financing tool could result in missed opportunities.

69 U SEFUL WEBSITES / C ONTACTS (PDNA, APNRDH, Donors pledge, resource allocation); (under construction) On the HRF: Joe Leitmann Center for Facilitation of Investment (CFI) Haitis one stop shop for company registration and incentive applications

70 T HE U.S. C OMMERCIAL S ERVICE D OING B USINESS IN H AITI P RESENTED BY : R OBERT J ONES R EGIONAL C OUNSELOR FOR C OMMERCIAL A FFAIRS

71 On January 12, 2010, the devastating earthquake created an economic tsunami, with total economic losses and damage estimated at over $7.8 billion percent of the entire Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the country. This was the first time in the history of the world that a natural disaster was so high relative to the size of a countrys economy. Seventy percent of those economic losses were suffered by the private sector. Doing Business in Haiti

72 March 31, 2010, the United Nations, in cooperation with the Government of Haiti, co-hosted the International Donors Conference Towards a New Future for Haiti. Fifty nine Donors pledged $9.9 billion for medium to long-term recovery, with $5.3 billion pledged for reconstruction activities over the next 18 months. Haiti will need an estimated $11.5 billion to repair the damage and build a New Haiti over the next decade. Doing Business in Haiti

73 Donors Conference created the new Interim Haiti Recovery Commission, to be headed up by Haitian Prime Minister Bellerive and former U.S. President Bill Clinton (IHRC). This entity will be able to seek, approve and coordinate projects. The World Bank also established a Donor Fiduciary Fund to oversee the disbursement of international reconstruction funds. Doing Business in Haiti

74 A number of organizations will participate in different aspects of the building of a new Haiti, including the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), the World Bank (WB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Additional entities such as the U.S. Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) and the U.S. Trade Development Agency (USTDA) will also devote their resources to this effort. Doing Business in Haiti

75 These entities will engage in projects and activities regarding the building of a new Haiti, and will make that information available to the public, along with requirements such as any pre-qualification process or other related issues. Doing Business in Haiti

76 Short-term Opportunities: emergency assistance and supplies; shelter; medical services and supplies; etc. Medium to Long-term Opportunities: These will be very significant as the general plans become focused and develop into specific projects, and then those projects are implemented. This will not be a rapid process; however, for firms which are informed and prepared, and which have established critical business linkages and relationships, these opportunities will be extensive and will be for the long- term. Doing Business in Haiti

77 For information about opportunities in regards to the Building of a New Haiti, please go to the U.S. Commercial Service Santo Domingo website and complete the Haiti Interest Form:

78 Contact us ! U.S. Commercial Service Caribbean Office Maria Elena Portorreal Regional Senior Commercial Specialist Dominican Republic Tel: (809) Fax: (809) Robert Jones Regional Counselor for Commercial Affairs Megan Schildgen Regional Commercial Attaché

79 Haiti Reconstruction Seminar Brooklyn, New York – May 10, 2010 OPIC and Haiti Facilitating U.S. Investment for Reconstruction and Development

80 OPIC Announces Special Initiatives OPIC has a long history in Haiti, and we will utilize that experience to encourage new American private sector investment in the country. Dr. Lawrence Spinelli OPIC Acting President February 17, 2010

81 Introduction to OPIC Independent agency of the U.S. government Established in 1971 Facilitates and supports U.S. private investment in developing economies abroad Supports economic development in over 150 countries and areas Helps U.S. companies access new markets where private capital may be difficult to obtain Supports commercially-viable projects on commercial terms

82 OPIC Products for Projects in Haiti Political Risk Insurance Protects investors against a variety of risks Long-term financing Provides loans and loan guaranties

83 OPIC Political Risk Insurance Protects against three political risks: Political Violence Expropriation Currency Inconvertibility The need for political risk insurance: Cover possible damage or loss to tangible assets, the value of investment, or earnings Obtain or attract financing in the face of risk Deter long-term losses through OPIC advocacy NGOs in Haiti Specialized coverage to support first responders To protect assets such as vehicles, equipment, supplies

84 Eligibility and Terms Available to U.S. investors, contractors, exporters, financial institutions, and NGOs Coverage for various types of investment: Equity, debt, leases, technical assistance agreements, performance/advance payment guaranties, contracts with a foreign government Coverage up to 90% of investment Up to $250 million per project, no minimum Up to 20-year tenors, fixed premium

85 OPIC Finance Finances a percentage of total project cost: Total project cost includes land, construction, equipment, overseas working capital, etc. Direct loans and loan guaranties Projects at least 25% owned by U.S. citizens, or other significant, long-term U.S. participation Repayment through project cashflow NGOs in Haiti Offer direct loans to American NGOs currently assisting humanitarian efforts in Haiti Loans will target NGOs that had exhausted their operating cash flow, enabling them to continue operations

86 Eligibility and Terms Finance up to 60% of the total project cost Up to 75% of the cost for an expansion of an existing project Sponsors should raise remaining funds in equity Sponsors/management must have experience in the same or a similar industry Loans from $100,000 up to $250 million Loan tenors typically between 5-15 years

87 Getting Started with OPIC 1. Review the website: (Hint: For financing, review SME Finance Eligibility Checklist ) 2. Consult Small Business Guide : 3. Contact the Public Information Officer: or +1 (202) Insurance: Complete Form 50 Finance: Complete Section1a of Form Need an advisor?

88 Alison Germak Public Information Officer Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) 1100 New York Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C U.S.A. Tel: +1 (202) Fax: +1 (202)

89 HAITI RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT B ROOKLYN B OROUGH H ALL M AY 10, 2010 Sara E. Hagigh, Deputy Director Office North & Central America & the Caribbean International Trade Administration U.S. Department Of Commerce

90 89 ITA Organization Under Secretary for International Trade ________________ Deputy Under Secretary for International Trade Assistant Secretary & Director General for U.S. Commercial Service ___________________ Deputy Director General U.S. Commercial Service Assistant Secretary Manufacturing & Services _________________ Deputy Assistant Secretary Manufacturing & Services Assistant Secretary Import Administration ________________ Deputy Assistant Secretary Import Administration Executive Direction/Admin CFO/Admin, CIO Public & Cong. Affairs DAS International Operations DAS Domestic Operations DAS Trade Agreements & Compliance DAS for Europe DAS for Western Hemisphere DAS for Asia DAS for Africa, Middle East & South Asia DAS for Manufacturing DAS for Industry Analysis DAS for Services DAS for AD/CVD Operations DAS for AD/CVD Policy and Negotiations DAS for Textiles & Apparel Assistant Secretary Market Access and Compliance ____________________ Deputy Assistant Secretary Market Access and Compliance

91 INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION U.S. Commercial Service – Promotion – Manufacturing and Services – Analysis – Import Administration – Enforcement – Market Access and Compliance – Access – 90

92 91 U.S. GLOBAL EXPORTS 2008 Source: U.S. Bureau of Census

93 CAFTA-DR region represents the 13 th largest U.S. export market world-wide ($25 billion 2008); 3rd largest in Latin America, after Mexico and Brazil. U.S. exports were 50 percent higher in 2008 compared to 2005, the year before the agreement went into force. U.S. trade surplus with CAFTA-DR grown to over $6 billion in 2008, reversing a trade deficit of $1 billion in U.S. imports from CAFTA-DR countries experienced more modest gains, but the region has also benefitted from expanded foreign investment flows. CAFTA-DR: O FF T O S TRONG S TART

94 H AITI – B USINESS R OUNDTABLE April – Washington DC 1. Hosted by Sec. Locke, with special guest speaker Haitian Minister Delatour 2. Senior Representation from Major Financial Institutions (TDA, USAID, OPIC, IDB) 3. Almost 400 Attendees 4. Currently three outreach events planned: New York City, May 10; Miami, May 25; and Philadelphia, June 7

95 Q UESTIONS & U SEFUL W EBSITES U.S. Dept. Commerce, International Trade Admin. - Office of North & Central America & Caribbean (202) Office of South America (202) Trade Information: Free Trade Agreements: Trade Statistics by State: tse.export.gov Market Access/Compliance Problems: tcc.export.gov 94

96 USTDA S O NGOING A CTIVITIES IN H AITI Port-au-Prince International Airport Security Training ($150,000): USTDA provided a technical assistance grant to Haitis National Airports Authority to support the training of airport security officials. Caribbean Airport Certification Process ($207,000): USTDA has approved funding for a technical assistance grant to the Executive Secretariat of the Caribbean Aviation Safety and Security Oversight System (CASSOS) to assist selected member countries, including Haiti, with their airport certification process. Proposals are due June 14, Aviation Cooperation Initiative of the Americas : The objective is to familiarize key Latin American and Caribbean aviation sector officials and project sponsors with the latest advances in U.S. aviation industry technologies through a series of reverse trade missions to the United States. USTDA Priority Sectors in Haiti: Transportation (Aviation, Ports) Energy Telecommunications Water and Wastewater Treatment Earthquake Monitoring

97 PERCEIVED OR REAL RISKS FRAGILE DEMOCRACY : SINCE 1996, UNEVENTFUL PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS REMOVAL OF SEVERAL PRIME MINISTERS BY PEACEFUL AND CONSTITUTIONAL MEANS PRESIDENT ARISTIDE WAS REMOVED BY THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION CRIME RATE : Haiti ( 11/100,000 ) Jamaica (67/100,000) Dominican Rep. (27/100,000) Costa Rica (17/100,000)

98 P ROJECT F UNDING G UIDELINES Evaluation Criteria: Whether the project is a high developmental priority for the project sponsor and the host country Likelihood the project will obtain implementation financing Ability to generate measurable commercial and developmental outcomes Mutual benefits for the United States and host country Grantee Profile: Host country federal, state, or local government entities Private host country companies

99 USTDA C ONTACT I NFORMATION U.S. Trade and Development Agency 1000 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1600 Arlington, Virginia Telephone (703) Fax (703) Website: Keith M. Eischeid Country Manager

100 BDNN STRATEGY SEVEN: SUPPORTING HAITI INITIATIVES AND DEVELOPMENTS NOMA/CHF - Tents to Haiti Haiti Softhouse/Rural Haiti – Transitional Housing I Believe in Haiti – Business Ideas for Haiti Choose Haiti - Haiti as a place of business Developing a team of designers to create products for micro-economy and small-scale development in Haiti BDNN/NOMA in Boston – 4 Panel Discussions at Boston Conference will include special UN Envoy –Ambassador Leslie Voltaire and How to get Work/Projects/Business in Haiti MORE TO COME

101 THE HAITI SOFTHOUSE SOFTHOUSE GROUP LLC L ONN C OMBS, AIA : P ROJECT D IRECTOR / P RINCIPAL R ODNEY L EON, AIA : P ROJECT M ANAGER / P RINCIPAL M ARK P ARSONS : D ESIGNER / P RINCIPAL D RAGANA Z ORIC, RA, RLA : A RCHITECT / P RINCIPAL

102 THE HAITI SOFTHOUSE T HE H AITI SOFTHOUSE IS A FLEXIBLE AND SUSTAINABLE APPROACH TO SHELTER THAT PROVIDES IMMEDIATE TRANSITIONAL HOUSING, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION SOLUTIONS. T HE SHELTER IS DESIGNED TO RESIST TROPICAL STORMS AND HURRICANE CONDITIONS, RESIST EARTHQUAKES, AND PROVIDE A HEALTHY, WELL VENTILATED ENVIRONMENT. T HE FLEXIBILITY OF THE STRUCTURE ALLOWS FOR MULTIPLE UNIT COMBINATIONS, ADDRESSING DOMESTIC SPACE NEEDS, INSTITUTIONAL NEEDS AND COMMUNITY NEEDS. T HE DESIGN FEATURES A LIGHTWEIGHT AND EASY - TO - ASSEMBLE STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAME THAT RECEIVES HIGH PERFORMANCE FABRIC WITH EXCELLENT WEATHER CAPABILITIES. T HE STRUCTURE CAN BE ANCHORED DIRECTLY INTO THE GROUND USING HIGH - STRENGTH EARTH ANCHORS IN A VARIETY OF SOIL CONDITIONS. T HE STRUCTURE IS DESIGNED TO BE ASSEMBLED WITH FEW PEOPLE IN ONE DAY OR LESS. T HE SOFTHOUSE GROUP WAS CONCEIVED AND INITIATED BY A GROUP OF DESIGNERS WITH UNIQUE COMPLIMENTARY EXPERTISE AND A COMMITMENT TO BRINGING HIGH QUALITY, SUSTAINABLE DESIGN SOLUTIONS TO THE CURRENT DEMANDS OF THE RECOVERY AND RECONSTRUCTION EFFORTS OF H AITI. T HE SOFTHOUSE GROUP IS CURRENTLY WORKING IN CONJUNCTION WITH T HE R URAL H AITI P ROJECT TO COMBINE CREATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERTISE WITH LOCAL AND CULTURAL KNOWLEDGE, IN ADDRESSING THE INTERMEDIATE NEEDS OF H AITI IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE 2010 EARTHQUAKE. HTTP :// BLACKDESIGNNEWS. COM / BLOG 1/2010/05/28/ THE - HAITI - SOFTHOUSE - LAUNCHES - IN - NEW - YORK / HTTP :// BLACKDESIGNNEWS. COM / BLOG 1/2010/05/28/ THE - HAITI - SOFTHOUSE - LAUNCHES - IN - NEW - YORK / About RURAL HAITI The Rural Haiti Project (RPH) is a youth leadership and community development organization that seeks to strengthen rural communities of Haiti by motivating, empowering and supporting young people in these often neglected regions to become leaders and builders of their communities. The organization explores creative ways to engage, challenge and encourage rural youth to set and reach new goals and to achieve their highest aspirations. RHP is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization registered in the United States and in Haiti. Website:http://www.ruralhaitiproject.orghttp://www.ruralhaitiproject.org Office:Phone: ; Fax: Location:180 Prospect Place, Suite 3B (Zip code11238) Brooklyn, NY180 Prospect Place, Suite 3B (Zip code11238)

103 THE HAITI SOFTHOUSE HTTP :// BLACKDESIGNNEWS. COM / BLOG 1/2010/05/28/ THE - HAITI - SOFTHOUSE - LAUNCHES - IN - NEW - YORK / HTTP :// BLACKDESIGNNEWS. COM / BLOG 1/2010/05/28/ THE - HAITI - SOFTHOUSE - LAUNCHES - IN - NEW - YORK /

104 THE HAITI SOFTHOUSE PARTNERS / FUNDER M ANUFACTURER : F ABRIC I MAGES, E LGIN I LLINOIS M ARCO A LVAREZ, CEO; F ABRIC I MAGES S AM L UGIANO ; A RCHITECTURE & D ESIGN F ABRIC I MAGES – N EW Y ORK HTTP :// BLACKDESIGNNEWS. COM / BLOG 1/2010/05/28/ THE - HAITI - SOFTHOUSE - LAUNCHES - IN - NEW - YORK / F ABRIC I MAGESF ABRIC I MAGES F ABRIC I MAGES HTTP :// BLACKDESIGNNEWS. COM / BLOG 1/2010/05/28/ THE - HAITI - SOFTHOUSE - LAUNCHES - IN - NEW - YORK /

105 BDNN- I B ELIEVE IN H AITI WILL COLLABORATE WITH I BELIEVE IN HAITI TO CREATE BUSINESS IDEAS FOR HAITI.

106 BDNN – CHOOSE HAITI Choose Haiti - Haiti as a place of business Developing a team of designers to create products for micro-economy and small-scale development in Haiti

107 BDNN AT NOMA BOSTON CONFERENCE IN OCTOBER 2010 BDNN/NOMA in Boston 4 Panel Discussions at Boston Conference Special UN Envoy –Ambassador Leslie Voltaire How to get Work/Projects/Business in Haiti BDNN Initiatives DETAILS WILL BE ON OUR WEBSITE BY JUNE 30

108 BDNN – THE CULTURE CODE THE CULTURE CODE by Renee Kemp- Rotan THIS WILL BE PRESENTED AT THE NOMA CONFERENCE IN BOSTON

109 BDNN - QUESTIONS FOR YOU 1. how can trained designers make a special contribution to the rebuilding of Haiti? 2. how can trained designers who are also from the Diaspora make a special contribution to the rebuilding of Haiti? 3. list those actions that need to occur in order to efficiently rebuild the country of Haiti, post-earthquake. 4. how does the world tend to deal with immense natural disasters throughout the world; and within the Diaspora? 5. how might you compare the disaster response to Katrina with the disaster response to Haiti? 6. what do you think of the idea of developing post- earthquake Haiti as the new utopia for the Diaspora? 7. what cultural principles must not be overlooked in developing a sustainable post-earthquake Haiti?

110 BDNN - MORE QUESTIONS 8. how might your firm or organization better contribute to a more sustainable culture in Haiti? 9. does your firm recruit culture experts to collaborate with its technical experts on on how to rebuild a civilization? 10. how might authorities on culture and authorities on infrastructure best strategize long-lasting solutions? 11. how might the effectiveness of that collaboration be best planned, prioritized, measured and implemented? 12. might your company wish to collaborate on the design of a pilot project in Haiti that tests the principles of 'a culture code'? 13. in what ways might your understanding of Haitian culture inform the design decisions that your firm produce there?

111 BDNN - Q/A QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

112 BDNN - THANK YOU ATIM ANNETTE OTON RENEE KEMP-ROTAN


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