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Teachers as Curriculum Designers www.schoolofeducators.com Thoughtful Education.

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Presentation on theme: "Teachers as Curriculum Designers www.schoolofeducators.com Thoughtful Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 Teachers as Curriculum Designers Thoughtful Education

2 Divergent Thinking Fluency Elaboration Flexibility Originality

3 Thoughtful Education Assumptions of Thoughtful Education 1. Improved instruction is the PRIME FACTOR in producing student achievement gains. 1. Professional Learning Communities are the SUREST and FASTEST path to instructional improvement. 2. Leadership begins with the recognition that we must eliminate the senseless things that divert time and attention away from the two elements most vital to school successhow we teach, which is best improved through focused teacher collaboration and what we teachin Marzanos words, a guaranteed and viable curriculum.

4 Think about a time you were involved in a creative process. What was the process like? What were your struggles? What were your rewards?

5 Creativity is a Mess--- From a Mess to a Model Generating Ideas Forming Big Ideas/Concepts Shaping Ideas Refining and Polishing Finished Product

6 What are the parts of a thoughtful unit of study? What is the difference between an activity planner and a curriculum designer? What makes writing a unit challenging and how can we simplify the process? How is a thoughtful unit of study like play dough? As a teacher do you model questioning in four styles when working with your teachers?

7 Imagine a BOX. In this box is a curriculum that teachers love to teach and students love to learn. What would be in the box?

8 Attributes Purpose Value How would you improve on the design? Knowledge by Design David Perkins Director Project Zero, Harvard University

9 The focus on learning becomes the leverage for improved teaching.

10 Look at the unit on evolution. What can you learn from the design? Attributes Purpose Value Improvements

11 StandardsStudents National State District School Learning Styles Multiple Intelligences Culture Interests Talents Skills Abilities Varied Assessment Task Rotation, Comprehensive Menus Graduated Difficulty Research Based Strategies and Tools Learning Style Profiles Hidden Skills

12 Foyer Library Kitchen Workroom Porch

13 Workroom Creating a Thoughtful Statement of Purpose Jigsaw Resource: Thoughtful Curriculum Guide Unpacking the Standards Know Parts of a Thoughtful Unit of Study Be Like Appreciation for the creative process and messiness of creativity. Collaboration and Collegiality Understand Components of a design Skills Unpack the standards Identify purpose Porch How is writing a thoughtful unit like play dough? Foyer Think of a Time Imagine a Box Generating Ideas Think Pair Share Rank Order Ladder Knowledge by Design Library Examining a Unit: Resource Evolution Unit Thoughtful Curriculum Guide Learning from Louie Learning from Research Learning from Examples Principles Five Easy Pieces Planning Your Unit Step 1: Identify Your Purpose Unpacking Core Content 4.1

14 What can we learn from Louie?

15 Standards SC-HS Students will: predict the impact on species of changes to 1) the potential for a species to increase its numbers, (2) the genetic variability of offspring due to mutation and recombination of genes, (3) a finite supply of the resources required for life, or (4) natural selection; propose solutions to real-world problems of endangered and extinct species. Species change over time. Biological change over time is the consequence of the interactions of (1) the potential for a species to increase its numbers, (2) the genetic variability of offspring due to mutation and recombination of genes, (3) a finite supply of the resources required for life and (4) natural selection. The consequences of change over time provide a scientific explanation for the fossil record of ancient life forms and for the striking molecular similarities observed among the diverse species of living organisms. Changes in DNA (mutations) occur spontaneously at low rates. Some of these changes make no difference to the organism, whereas others can change cells and organisms. Only mutations in germ cells have the potential to create the variation that changes an organisms future offspring. DOK 3

16 Standards Students will describe patterns of human settlement in regions of Kentucky and explain how these patterns were influenced by physical characteristics (e.g. climate, landforms, soils, vegetation, bodies of water. Students will describe how the physical environment both promoted and restricted human activities during the early settlement of Kentucky. Students will use a variety of tools to explain significant events in Kentuckys history. Students will give examples of why people explored and settled Kentucky.

17 Built to Last Research Behind Effective Unit Design Madeline Hunter Grant Wiggins & Jay McTighe Benjamin Bloom Five Easy Pieces

18 dentify the standards, big ideas, key details. etermine your essential questions. lign instruction/assessment to diversity, research based strategies, and hidden skills. stablish your assessment task and criteria. equence the learning events.

19 Components of Thoughtful Curriculum Design Identify your Purpose A statement of purpose defines what you want students to know, understand, do, and be like. A statement of purpose includes a set of essential questions that last over time and frame the learning.

20 Knowledge What specific facts, details, or vocabulary does the unit need to address? Understanding What big ideas and themes need to be covered? Attitudes What dispositions or attitudes does the unit instill in students? Skills What skills do students need to develop? What Essential Questions will frame the learning?

21 Task Description Assessment pulls together the various threads you have explored throughout the unit and provides students an equal opportunity to show what they know and apply what they have learned. Clear expectations are defined through a rubric or scoring guide. Components of Thoughtful Unit Design

22 Assessment: How will students understanding be measured? Task Rotation Comprehensive Menus Graduated Difficulty Project Learning

23 StandardsActivityStrategy/ToolProductLearning Style

24 Now, it is your turn to frame your unit of study.

25 Knowledge Understanding Attitudes Skills Identify the framework for learning……

26 Workroom Porch What essential questions will serve as the foundation for learning?

27 Foyer Library Kitchen Workroom Porch Hook/Bridge Resources Assessment Activities Reflection

28 Assessment: How will students understanding be measured?

29 How is a thoughtful curriculum like play dough?

30 Teaching, What Matters Most Teacher Impact on Learning

31 Teacher Student Home Peers Schools Principals What influences matter?

32 1.Leadership, teaching, and adult actions matter. While it is true that demographic variables are directly linked to student achievement, it is also true that adult variables, including the professional practices of teachers and the decisions leaders make, can be more important than demographic variables.

33 The single greatest determinant of learning is NOT socioeconomic factors or funding levels---IT IS INSTRUCTION. Mike Schmoker

34 Indisputable Evidence What teachers do has six to ten times as much impact on achievement as all other factors combined. Mortimer Simmons The single greatest determinant of learning is NOT socioeconomic factors or funding levels, IT IS INSTRUCTION. Mike Schmoker

35 Indisputable Evidence Two teachers working with the same socio-economic population can achieve starkly different results. Different Results In one class 27% of the students pass a state assessment. In another 72% of the students will pass a state assessment.

36 Thoughtful Education Assumptions of Thoughtful Education 1. Improved instruction is the PRIME FACTOR in producing student achievement gains. 1. Professional Learning Communities are the SUREST and FASTEST path to instructional improvement. Three years of Effective Teaching accounts for an improvement of percentile points. William Sanders

37 Thoughtful Education Assumptions of Thoughtful Education 1. Improved instruction is the PRIME FACTOR in producing student achievement gains. 1. Professional Learning Communities are the SUREST and FASTEST path to instructional improvement. The best teachers in a school,that is to say the top 1/3, have SIX TIMES more impact on student learning than the bottom 1/3. Katie Haycock

38 Thoughtful Education There can be no improvement without the teacher.

39 A successful, face to face team is more than just collectively intelligent. It makes everyone work work harder, think smarter, and reach better conclusions than they would have own their own. James Solowreck

40 Why Professional Learning Communities? Instructional Learning Teams ensure follow up and reflection on instruction and its impact on learning. Instructional Learning Teams are results driven. Instructional Learning Teams reinforce a focus on common essential instructional standards. Instructional Learning Teams create the best kind of accountabilitya commitment to people we know. Instructional Learning Teams honor and empower the intelligence of teachers.

41 Imagine you are on a Learning Walk in your school. What would be the general quality of instruction throughout the building? What would be the level of student engagement be? What would you see and hear?

42 In an extensive research study conducted by 24/7, 2005 of 1,500 classrooms here is what was observed: BehaviorsPercentage Evidence of clear learning goals/objectives4% Worksheets52% Lecture31% Monitoring with no feedback22% Use of high yield research based instructional strategies 2% Communication rich environments with writing and rubrics 2% Fewer than half the students engaged82% Bell to bell learningLess than 1%

43 What is going on in your school? How does this compare to a Thoughtful Classroom? BehaviorsPercentage Evidence of clear learning goals/objectives4% Worksheets52% Lecture31% Monitoring with no feedback22% Use of high yield research based instructional strategies 2% Communication rich environments with writing and rubrics 2% Fewer than half the students engaged82% Bell to bell learningLess than 1%

44 Moving from an Instructional Leader to a Learning Leader. Rick DuFour

45 There are particular leadership actions that show demonstrable links to improved student achievement and educational equity.

46 Inquiry: the degree to which school leaders analyze the underlying causes of deficiencies and successes in student achievement and equity. Successful inquiry attributes the causes to adults in the educational systemteachers, school leaders, and policymakers. Unsuccessful inquiry attributes causes to students. In other words, blame the victim is not only morally reprehensible but statistically untrue.

47 Implementation: the degree to which the specific elements of school improvement processes are implemented at the student and classroom levels. Effective implementation is a continuous variable in which leaders recognize that there are degrees of successful implementation that are subject to quantitative and narrative description.

48 Monitoring: the degree to which a school self assesses their own progress in reaching school goals. Plans without monitoring are little better than wishes upon stars. It is important to distinguish carefully between appropriate and insightful monitoring and monitoring that equates to a compliance drill for external authorities. Assessment and reflection is designed to improve teaching and learning, provide immediate feedback for students and teachers, and focus on specific objectives.

49 The focus on learning becomes the leverage for improved teaching.

50 What percentage of your students are academically successful?

51 Do you know the names, faces and stories of those who will not be successful at the end of the year?

52 What do Learning Profiles look like? Are you using profile data to support student learning?

53 What Matters Most… From Planning to Performance PIMPIM

54 What Matters Most… From Planning to Performance Planning Implementation Monitoring

55 Amount of Resources, Time, Focused Support Available to the New Initiative Number of Old, Continuing, Pending and New Initiatives High Low Low High Frustration Burnout Low Implementation No Implementation Enthusiasm Overload Commitment High Implementation Little Implementation

56 Weeding the Garden Every school has weeds. The gardener must continuously remove the weeds in order to ensure a healthy garden.

57 Learning Leaders must be ever vigilant for persistent weeds with deep roots in the academic garden.

58 What is Leadership? Leadership is the continuous engagement in moving individuals and organizations from their present state to an ideal state.

59 To lead learning means to model a learner-centered as opposed to authority centered approach to all problems, inside and outside the classroom.

60 Tools for Schools: A Learning SWEEP

61 . Imagine a Box….not Pandoras Box, but a box that would provide answers your school has been searching for in your quest for school improvement. What would go in the box?

62 Meet Dennis Mitchell, a Learning Leader

63 SWEEPSWEEP. Inquiry Focus: What does reading instruction look like and sound like in our school? How can we improve reading instruction and student learning? Are students learning styles addressed so as to provide equal opportunity to learn?

64 SWEEPSWEEP elect a focus and collect three consecutive days of work.. Reading Class

65 SWEEPSWEEP ork on the work, analyze the work using criteria.. Reading Class

66 Task: After reading Titanic Found draw a picture and write a summary of the text. Summarizing Recall Creating Visuals Mastery Learning Style

67 SWEEPSWEEP. xamine teaching practices and students learning. What patterns emerge? What questions need answering? What are our greatest needs? What are the implications?

68 SWEEPSWEEP.. valuate and assess what is working, what is not. What are we doing well? What do we need to do MORE of?

69 SWEEPSWEEP. lan a course of action for reaching school improvement goals. Goal Action Dates Expected Outcome Results

70 What can a school learn from a SWEEP? How might this information bring about improvement in teaching and learning? How is this data different from the type of data you presently use?


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