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Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 1 A Brief History of Interactivity in Performance ^ very ^ at a distance PLEASE VIEW IN SLIDE SHOW MODE TO ACTIVATE.

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Presentation on theme: "Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 1 A Brief History of Interactivity in Performance ^ very ^ at a distance PLEASE VIEW IN SLIDE SHOW MODE TO ACTIVATE."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 1 A Brief History of Interactivity in Performance ^ very ^ at a distance PLEASE VIEW IN SLIDE SHOW MODE TO ACTIVATE AUDIO PLEASE VIEW IN SLIDE SHOW MODE TO ACTIVATE AUDIO

3 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 2 Pre-Human Interactive Performance? The Oceania Project Download Video File from content/uploads/2011/05/ CCRMA_World_Opera_WhaleSong_Slide2.wmv CLICK MOUSE TO ADVANCE TO NEXT SLIDE CLICK MOUSE TO ADVANCE TO NEXT SLIDE

4 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 3 Perhaps Not Speed of sound in water ~ 0.92 miles/second Speed of sound in water ~ 0.92 miles/second Singer 100 miles away hears song 92 seconds late & response arrives another 92 seconds later, more than three minutes! Singer 100 miles away hears song 92 seconds late & response arrives another 92 seconds later, more than three minutes! Christophe Dang Ngoc Chan

5 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 4 Human Communication Frederick Remington

6 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 5 Jack Johnson v. Jim Jeffries Reno, NV, 1910 Result learned within hours by explorer Thomas Cameron Taylor in central Africa 180 miles from the nearest telegraph line drum telegraph Assam, India

7 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 6 Map of High- Speed Wireless Communications System in France

8 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 7 The Original Telegraph: (-1880 in Sweden) replacingexistinginfrastructure is difficult!

9 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 8 Telegraph-controlled puppet, 1851 Harmonic telegraph, 1874

10 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May 17 9 The New York Times, April 3, 1877

11 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May The operator in Providence plays the banjo, the Worcester operator the harmonica, and gently the others sing. Some tune will be started by the players and the other will sing. To appreciate the effect, one must have a transmitter close to his ear. The music will sound as clear as though it were in the same room. Boston Evening Record, about an 1891 concert organized by operators in Worcester, Fall River, Boston, Springfield, Providence and New York

12 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May Satellite Arts Project 1977 Kit Galloway & Sherrie Rabinowitz Kit Galloway & Sherrie Rabinowitz NASA facilities NASA facilities GEO delay ~ ¼-second GEO delay ~ ¼-second

13 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May AES ISDN Concert 1995 APT codecs APT codecs Jesse Rae, Scottish Borders Jesse Rae, Scottish Borders Dan Dean, Seattle Dan Dean, Seattle Angus Clark, New York Angus Clark, New York Audience in New York Audience in New York

14 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May An Olympic Thought The five Olympic rings represent the five continents; why not open the 1998 Games with choruses singing together on five continents?

15 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May Distributed But Not Interactive Nagano Winter Olympics 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics 1998 orchestra in concert hall fed orchestra in concert hall fed choruses in Beijing, Berlin, Cape Town, Nagano, New York, & Sydney with multi-hop satellite delays, which fed choruses in Beijing, Berlin, Cape Town, Nagano, New York, & Sydney with multi-hop satellite delays, which fed Olympics stadium after frame-rate conversion & multi-hop satellite delays, where 2000 chorus & 50,000 spectators sang with speaker delays to ms Olympics stadium after frame-rate conversion & multi-hop satellite delays, where 2000 chorus & 50,000 spectators sang with speaker delays to ms

16 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May Speeds Light Light 299,792,458 m/s in a vacuum 299,792,458 m/s in a vacuum (~186,282 MPH) (~186,282 MPH) slower in denser media slower in denser media ~ 185,000 m/s in an optical fiber ~ 185,000 m/s in an optical fiber Sound Sound 0 in a vacuum no sound in a pure vacuum faster in denser media ~ 343 m/s in dry, room-temp. air ~ 1125 ft/s ~ 1484 m/s in water ~ 5120 m/s in iron I have, by the help of a distended wire propagated the sound to a very considerable distance in an instant – Robert Hooke, Micrographia pulse dispersion

17 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May CircusMaximus,AncientRome 2037 ft. long speed of sound ~ 1125/s ~1.8 sec. one end to other

18 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May more than four US TV frames of acoustic delay about three US TV frames of acoustic delay Metropolitan Opera House

19 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May Stockholm-Palo Alto: 5379 miles direct Stockholm-Palo Alto: 5379 miles direct ~ 29 ms for light in a vacuum ~ 29 ms for light in a vacuum acoustically equivalent to about a 33-foot separation acoustically equivalent to about a 33-foot separation Metropolitan Opera proscenium is 54 feet across Metropolitan Opera proscenium is 54 feet across unfortunately, no direct vacuum pipe unfortunately, no direct vacuum pipe add fiber delay, routing delay, processing delay: ~123 ms, 138 feet add fiber delay, routing delay, processing delay: ~123 ms, 138 feet Porgy and Bess will be pretty far apart! Porgy and Bess will be pretty far apart!

20 Mark Schubin, World Opera, 2011 May Lets See! This presentation will be available soon in the Get the Download section of SchubinCafe.com This concludes this presentation.


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