Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Report Out 29 May 2009 Celebrating 25 Years as the Voice of the Army Family 2009 USARPAC Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) Conference.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Report Out 29 May 2009 Celebrating 25 Years as the Voice of the Army Family 2009 USARPAC Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) Conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 Report Out 29 May 2009 Celebrating 25 Years as the Voice of the Army Family 2009 USARPAC Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) Conference

2 1. Issue 526 Fund shipment of second POV for PCS moves 2. Issue 596 Establish a searchable convicted Sex Offender Registry OCONUS 3. Issue 613 Develop/Implement fully funded tutoring service benefits not based on GPA 4. Issue 497 Allow Soldiers with 10+ years to transfer GI Bill benefits to dependents 5. Issue 521 Provide in state tuition rates to Military Family members 6. Issue 600 Authorize funded travel for dependents with deployments over 179 days to Family Care Plan location of Soldiers choice Six Most Critical Active HQDA AFAP Issues

3 Mobilization, Deployment, and Family Readiness Strengths 1. Army Community Service (ACS) Deployment Programs 2. Greater Awareness of Non-Visible Injuries 3. Blue Star Card/Deployment Discounts 4. Savings Deposit Program (10% interest accounts) 5. Rear Detachment Support for Family Members

4 Mobilization, Deployment, and Family Readiness Challenges 1.Dwell Time Following Deployments 2.Multiple Deployments 3.Improving Information flow between Rear Detachments, Family Readiness Groups and Family Members 4.Financial challenges for National Guard/Reserve 5.Reverse Soldier Readiness Process (SRP) and Screening

5 1.TRICARE Worldwide Network 2.Promotion Points for Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) Permanent Profiles 3.Non-dependent Caregiver Travel and Transportation 4.TRICARE Retiree Dental Premiums 5.Dependents Student Loan Repayment USARPAC AFAP Top Five Issues

6 FRTI Team Facilitator: Jessica Ford Recorder: Allen Thornton Transcriber: Dawn LaBay Issue Support: Cheri Weber Room Manager: Theresa Johnson Workgroup 1 Medical, Dental, and Youth

7 Spokesperson: Paul Mireles Delegates: Levashia Bynam Deborah Coubrough Kimberly Cullum Jackie Duncan Ben Mesa Paul Richards Kahale Richardson-Naki Ryan Robles Mark Stroessel Gail Tamaribuchi Workgroup 1 Medical, Dental, and Youth

8 Title: TRICARE Worldwide Network Scope: TRICARE does not have a worldwide network that allows regions to view and share information. TRICARE regions cannot access medical record information and resolve issues such as billing problems or referrals at the local office that occur in a different region. For example, if a Service Member stationed in one TRICARE region receives services in another region, the Service Member must physically carry their medical records to receive continuity of care resulting in difficulty in filing claims. Unpaid claims and unresolved health care issues may cause mental, physical and emotional anguish negatively impacting Service Members and their Families. Recommendation: Establish a TRICARE worldwide network to allow regions to update and review customer information regardless of region assigned. Issue 1

9 Title: Army Youth Employment Skills Program Scope: The Army does not have a youth employment skills program whereby high school students have an opportunity to bank dollar credits toward their post-secondary education/training while learning valuable work skills and having a positive impact in the community. In comparison, the Air Force has the program called Youth Employment Skills (YES). YES is an on-base volunteer program for high school students. The program, underwritten by the Air Force Aid Society (AFAS) is a joint effort between AFAS and Air Force Family Member Programs Flight. YES allows high school students to "bank" $4 in grant funding for every hour volunteered with an on-base function. Students may accumulate as many as 250 hours during 4 years of high school combined, for a potential maximum of $1,000 toward their future post-secondary education/training goals. A Youth Employment Skills program would allow Army teens to gain critical job skills while earning money for college. Recommendation: Create a Youth Employment Skills program for Army teens similar to the Air Force YES program. Issue 2

10 Title: Alternative Durable Medical Equipment and Supply Reimbursement Scope: TRICARE beneficiaries are not reimbursed for the purchase of alternative durable medical equipment and related supplies that are not available through TRICARE providers. For example, if the only Durable Medical Equipment (DME) authorized by TRICARE for a child needing glucose monitoring requires a finger prick when there are other less invasive, less painful options are available, the patient should be able to purchase the alternate DME and be reimbursed for the off set of the original unit. When a Primary Care Manager cannot justify, by medical necessity, an alternative to the TRICARE standard, patients must incur the full expense of the alternative. Reimbursement of durable medical equipment and supply alternatives enhance a patients quality of life based on convenience, comfort, size, or function. Recommendation: Authorize reimbursement for the purchase of alternative durable medical equipment and supplies. Issue 3

11 Title: OCONUS DoD Civilian and Family Member Access to Dental Care Scope: OCONUS DoD civilians and their Family members have limited access to military dental facilities. Dental care within the local off post community is typically expensive and complicated due to language barriers, cultural norms and quality of treatment options. Army Regulation 40-400 authorizes Other Than Active Duty beneficiaries dental care depending on space availability and according to statutory requirements. Health Affairs Policy 97-045 states that dental care for other than active duty personnel shall be available at a dental treatment facility only when at least 95% of active duty personnel assigned to that facility for routine care are in Dental Class 1 or 2. Increasing available slots at military dental facilities contributes to civilian oral health and dental wellness. Recommendation: Allocate dedicated slots for dental care appointments at military facilities for OCONUS DoD civilians and their Family members. Issue 4

12 Title: TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP) Premiums Scope: A disparity exists in the premiums between the TRICARE Dental Program (TDP) for active duty Family members and the TRICARE Retiree Dental Program. Both the TDP and the TRDP are based on federal legislation. TRDP premiums are based on 5 pricing regions and the enrollees zip code, monetarily penalizing retirees based on where they chose to retire. Retirees, including the growing number of medically retired Soldiers, incur greater out- of-pocket dental care premiums compared to TDP beneficiaries. Recommendation: Eliminate TRDP Premiums. Issue 5

13 Workgroup 2 Force Support FRTI Team Facilitator: Amanda Eddy Transcriber: Frederica Norman Issue Support/Recorder: Diane Broome Room Manager: Erica Silvestre

14 Workgroup 2 Force Support Spokesperson: Deirdre Spencer Delegates: Lakisha Canady-Toussaint Eddy Ford Janice Hidrovo Angel Lono Elizabeth Marose Rose Mesa Jennifer Mireles Richard Ramirez Oubrinyahn Stonewall Dewanna Thornton

15 Issue 1 Title: Non-dependent Caregiver Travel and Transportation Scope: Non-dependent caregivers are not authorized travel and transportation when traveling to a Familys duty station to care for children of Army Wounded Warrior (AW2) Families when the next- of-kin (NOK) must travel to the AW2 bedside. The burden of travel and/or transportation cost is borne on the NOK or non-dependent caregiver. The cost associated with non-dependent caregiver travel and transportation expenses can create additional financial and emotional burdens for the AW2 Family. Recommendation: Authorize travel and transportation for non- dependent caregivers when the NOK must travel to the AW2 bedside.

16 Issue 2 Title: Enlisted Leadership Position Allowance Scope : Enlisted Soldiers receive no allowance when assuming leadership positions with a command. According to the 2009 Basic Pay Chart, a Captain with 6 years of service and a First Sergeant with 16 years of service have a 17 percent difference in pay. A Lieutenant Colonel with 18 years of service and a Command Sergeant Major (CSM) with 20 years of service have a 30 percent difference in pay. A General with 38 years service and a CSM with 38 years have a pay difference of 62 percent. These disparities favor the Commissioned Officer and affect morale and retention of Enlisted Soldiers in leadership positions. Recommendation: Implement a leadership position allowance for Enlisted Soldiers in leadership positions complimentary to officer command positions.

17 Issue 3 Title: Promotion Points for Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) Permanent Profiles Scope: Soldiers on permanent profiles do not have alternate events for APFT push-ups and sit-ups. To qualify for promotion points, the Soldier must attain a minimum of 60 points on each APFT event: push-up, sit-up, and two-mile run. Soldiers with a permanent profile for the push-up and/or sit- up are granted 60 points for each waived event. For example, a Soldier on permanent profile for no push-up scores 100 points on the sit-up and two- mile run event receives 260 as their overall PT score and 26 points on their Promotion Point Worksheet. In comparison, a Soldier on permanent profile for no push-up and sit-up scores 100 points on the two-mile event receives 220 as their overall PT score and 15 points on their Promotion Point Worksheet. Soldiers with permanent profiles for the push-up and/or sit-up event cannot earn as many points as Soldiers without permanent profiles placing them at a disadvantage for promotion points and promotions. Recommendation : Implement an alternate event that awards points and evaluates the same muscle groups as sit-ups and push-ups.

18 Issue 4 Title: Dependents Student Loan Repayment Scope: Soldiers cannot transfer unused education benefits to repay dependents existing student loans. Dependents often attend college to obtain a portable career, learn new life skills or to remain proficient in their current career. Soldiers have the option to repay their existing student loans. Costly dependent student loan debt creates a financial strain on military Families when a Soldiers unused education benefits goes unused. Recommendation: Allow Soldiers to transfer unused education benefits to dependents to repay existing student loans.

19 USARPAC Commanders Steering Committee TBD... HQDA AFAP Conference Alexandria, Virginia 8 - 15 January 2010 The Way Ahead

20 Thank you for your participation and support! Celebrating 25 Years as the Voice of the Army Family 2009 USARPAC Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) Conference


Download ppt "Report Out 29 May 2009 Celebrating 25 Years as the Voice of the Army Family 2009 USARPAC Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) Conference."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google