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Administering the Kindergarten WIDA-ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT™)

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1 Administering the Kindergarten WIDA-ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT™)
Participants will receive an overview of the background and purpose of the adaptive WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT) for Kindergarten, and to administer and score each component (Oral, Reading, and Writing). The training module allows for state-level customization to address how different states interpret the Kindergarten W-APT results for the purpose of ELL placement and other service decisions. Presenter Affiliation, Date © 2011 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, on behalf of the WIDA Consortium

2 DO NOT POST THESE MATERIALS TO PUBLIC WEBSITES OR FORUMS.
SECURE & CONFIDENTIAL DO NOT POST THESE MATERIALS TO PUBLIC WEBSITES OR FORUMS. Contains secure and confidential information.

3 Training Objectives To understand the purpose, organization and structure of the Kindergarten W-APT. To learn how to reliably administer and score the Kindergarten W-APT. To learn how Kindergarten W-APT scores are used in <insert state/district> to determine ELL placement and services.

4 Purposes of the Kindergarten W-APT
To identify the academic English language proficiency level of students who may be candidates for ESL and/or bilingual services. To determine the academic English language proficiency level of students new to a school or to the U.S. school system in order to determine appropriate instructional services For either purpose, the W-APT should be considered as only one element in the decision making process. Decisions to exit a student from ELL services should be supported by the student’s annual progress on the ACCESS for ELLs assessment, and on other evidence as well, such as academic content assessments, teacher recommendations, and other informative documentation.

5 Which Components should be Administered to each Student?
Listening and Speaking (combined into Oral Proficiency component) Assesses oral English proficiency For students in pre-K through mid-Grade 1 Reading and Writing tests Optional; results in diagnostic statements rather than ranking For students in mid-K through Mid-Grade 1 Pre-K 1st sem. K 2nd sem. K 1st sem. Gr. 1 Listening & Speaking Reading & Writing The oral components of the Kindergarten W-APT provide an Oral Proficiency score, which can be used to determine the level and extent of services appropriate for each student. The Reading and Writing portions are optional assessments that can be used to gain more information on a student’s reading and writing skills, but should not be used as the sole measure to determine placement in ELL services. Because even native English-speaking children at this age are not expected to have academic English in Reading and Writing, the results of the Reading and Writing components provide diagnostic information that may be used as additional criteria to guide instruction and service delivery. <Comment on your state’s policy and/or guidelines for using Kindergarten W-APT scores to determine students’ placement (or not) in ELL services.>

6 Raw Score for Listening and Speaking Oral Proficiency Score
Oral Proficiency Test Scripted Can take up to 15 minutes to administer Scoring is adaptive Student responds to prompt and TA marks score Key and rubric included on scoring sheet Convert raw score into oral proficiency score Raw Score for Listening and Speaking Oral Proficiency Score 0-10 Low 11-18 Mid 19-28 High 29-30 Exceptional The oral proficiency scores given in the chart are general groupings that are loosely correlated to the WIDA ELP Scale. Convert raw score into oral proficiency score (chart also in manual and on summary scoring sheet)

7 Diagnostic Reading and Writing Test
Optional, not for determining ELL services NOT appropriate for children in Pre-K or entering Kindergarten Intended for children in mid-K or entering 1st grade Same administration format as Listening and Speaking Convert raw score to skill description for Reading/Writing Because literacy is so developmental for students at this age, it is not recommended that the diagnostic literacy test (Reading and Writing components of the W-APT) be administered until students have had some literacy instruction, or the second semester of Kindergarten at the earliest.

8 Diagnostic Reading and Writing Test
Raw Score Skill(s) Description 0-2 No ability 3-5 Can match simple pictures to each other 6-10 Can recognize letters 11-12 Can recognize words 13 Can read simple phrases 14-15 Can read simple sentences Writing Raw Score Skill(s) Description 0-3 No ability 4-7 Can copy letters 8-11 Can complete simple words with initial letter 12-14 Can write simple words 15-16 Can write simple phrases 17-18 Can write simple sentences 8

9 Kindergarten W-APT™ Test Administration Manual
Materials Kindergarten W-APT™ Test Administration Manual Listening and Speaking Test (Oral Proficiency) Listening and Speaking Picture Cue Booklet Listening and Speaking Script Listening and Speaking Scoring Sheet Reading and Writing Test (Optional Diagnostic) Reading Picture Cue Booklet Writing Picture Cue Booklet Reading and Writing Script Reading and Writing Scoring Sheet

10 How to Access the Kindergarten W-APT
Free and downloadable from Username: <two-letter state title> + district number (e.g. ky376) Password: <state specific word> + administrators last name (e.g. bluegrassjohnson) Printing and dissemination – state dependent Hard copies can be ordered from MetriTech, Inc. Cost is $90 per master copy All W-APT materials must be accessed and downloaded from the secure site District and school assessment staff will be provided with password access to the site, and authorized individuals may access the site to download electronic files of the tests. These files are made available in PDF formats, which may be printed using the freely available Adobe Reader® software. Downloaded files must be printed by the district or school and made available to test administrators. <Add in state specific information.>

11 WIDA Home Page Login with your District-wide W-APT username and password on the WIDA home page 11

12 Scroll to the bottom of this page for a listing of the materials
Welcome Screen Scroll to the bottom of this page for a listing of the materials Note to presenter: in some states the W-APT login will take the user directly to the page on the next slide. In these cases please delete this slide in your presentation. 12

13 Welcome Screen (cont.) View the printing instructions and Scored Student Writing Sample booklet Select ‘Kindergarten’ to access: Kindergarten Manual Kindergarten specific testing materials View W-APT Kindergarten administration webinar 13

14 W-APT Printing Instructions
For proper administration of the Kindergarten W-APT, most materials should be printed single-sided. Some but not all of the W-APT materials may be printed double-sided to conserve paper. Please use this chart, available on the WIDA website (www.wida.us) to determine whether two-sided printing is allowable, and whether binding the booklets is recommended. It is important to print the test materials according to the instructions in this table so that the test can be administered properly.

15 Preparing for Test Administration
Students must be tested individually in a one-on-one interview format in a quiet, private room or carrel Post a Do Not Disturb: Testing sign on the testing room door on test days Assure that the student’s name is written on the scoring sheet and consumable test forms Administer test to the student using a rectangular (preferred) or circular table Place yourself at a right angle to the student Make sure students can see the test materials when they lie flat on the table. Provide at least two sharpened pencils This test is designed to be administered in a variety of testing environments, such as intake centers, classrooms, and other locations. Preparing an appropriate testing environment will facilitate a smooth test administration, but the details are left to the discretion of the test administrator. The following considerations should be addressed, however: It is not necessary to cover any print on the walls or on classroom materials. Unused tests and tests that are not kept for internal records should be destroyed.

16 Administering the Oral Proficiency Components (Listening and Speaking)

17 Layout Oral Proficiency component is divided into 5 parts (Parts A through E) Corresponding page numbers for the Picture Cue booklet are listed in the heading of each Part Brief orientation to the task is included If a child responds incorrectly to the first task in both Listening and Speaking sections, model the correct response, score the item 0, and move on to the next task If a child responds correctly, score the item 1, and move on to the next task The script begins with a warm-up to greet the student and make him or her comfortable with the testing situation. The script contains detailed directions on which picture prompt/page of the picture cue book corresponds to each scripted item. The script also directs you to point to various items when appropriate, and each Part concludes with criteria for advancement. For example, “If student scores at least 3 items correctly; continue to Part B; if not, end the test by saying: “(prompt provided in script)” Remember, this is an adaptive test so at each transition point you will make a determination about whether the child will continue.

18 Navigating the Oral Proficiency Components: Parts A–C
Administer and score all Listening tasks in Part A. Administer and score all Speaking tasks in Part A. Calculate the score Based on the scoring guidelines in the script, determine whether the student will advance to the next Part or wind down Repeat steps 1–3 for Parts B and C as necessary

19 Navigating the Oral Proficiency Components Parts D–E
Administer and score the first Listening task in Part D Administer and score the first Speaking task in Part D Continue alternating the Listening and Speaking tasks until Part D is complete Calculate the score Based on the scoring guidelines in the script, determine whether the student will advance to the next Part or wind down Repeat steps 1–3 for Part E as necessary Note: Follow the script for winding down at the end of Part E

20 Example Script Layout 20

21 Listening and Speaking Picture Cues
Read the prompt and point to the object(s) indicated in the script In the picture cue booklet, the corresponding script page is listed in the lower right-hand corner in a black box Some pictures are used for multiple parts Part B: 10-12 Part C: 13-18

22 Listening and Speaking: Part A
In Listening Part A, the student is asked to point to something in the picture In Speaking Part A, the Test Administrator points to various items, as scripted, to elicit the child’s answer Listening example: “Show me the house.” Speaking example: “What is this?” For Listening, follow the key. For Speaking, do not be overly strict regarding correct pronunciation. Variant or dialectal pronunciations of English are acceptable. The key offers possible correct answers and gives the TA a sample of the quality and quantity of language expected in the correct response. It does not include all possible correct responses. If a student responds by telling you the word for another object close to the one in the task, then the response can be accepted. For example, if you point to the tree and the student identifies the bird sitting in the tree and says “bird,” that response is acceptable.

23 Listening and Speaking: Part B
In Listening Part B, the student is asked to manipulate the picture cue booklet In Speaking Part B, the student is asked to describe the picture Speaking example: “What do you see in this picture?” Listening example: “Turn the page.” For Listening, follow the key. For Speaking, score the response as correct if the student responds in English telling you something about the picture. Give 1 point for each description (up to 3 points) and use the prompt in the script as needed. Once the student finishes their response, calculate the total score and follow the Criterion instructions and script for moving on.

24 Listening and Speaking: Part C
In Listening Part C, the student is asked to point to different things in the picture In Speaking Part C, the student is asked to describe something that is going on in the picture Listening example: “Point to the bird. Show me the bird’s nest.” Speaking example: “What is the bird doing?” For Listening, follow the key and if the student points to at least one of the two sequencing steps, score correct. For Speaking, score the response as correct if the student responds in English telling you something about the picture. Any reasonable response is acceptable. 24

25 Listening and Speaking: Part D
Listening example: “Point to what Maria did first, and what she did next.” In Listening Part D, the student is asked to point to two sequenced actions, based on a short story read aloud In Speaking Part D, the student is asked to retell the two actions in sequence Speaking example: “Tell me what Maria did first and what she did next.” For Listening, credit is given if the student points to the two pictures in the correct sequence. If the Listening response is incorrect, withhold scoring until you hear the student’s response for the corresponding Speaking task. If the student’s Listening response is in the wrong sequence, but the Speaking response is in the right order, then mark both Listening and Speaking correct. Note: It is not necessary for the student to use sequential language (e.g. “first," or “then”) in order to retell the story correctly. For Speaking, the response is correct if the student tells what happened in the story in the correct sequence.

26 Listening and Speaking: Part E
In Listening Part E, the student is asked to point to one of two pictures, the one that completes the short story read aloud In Speaking Part E, the student must retell the story Listening example: “Which of these pictures shows the end of the story?” For Listening, credit is given if the student points to the picture showing the correct ending of the story. If the Listening response is incorrect, withhold scoring until you hear the student’s response for the corresponding Speaking task. If the student points to the wrong picture, but the Speaking response includes the correct ending to the story, then mark both Listening and Speaking correct. Note: It is not necessary for the student to use sequential language (e.g. “first" or “then”) in order to retell the story correctly. For Speaking, the response is correct if the student tells what happened in the story in the correct sequence with an appropriate ending. Extended discourse (a series of sentences, whether each is complete or not) is expected in order to give credit. Completeness of the story the student retells is most important. The response should be more than just a one word description about each picture. Speaking example: “Now it’s your turn. Look at the pictures again. Tell me the whole story.”

27 Scoring Information Using the Oral Proficiency Scoring Sheet, mark responses as right (with a 1) or wrong (with a 0) Listening Responses Follow the scoring guidance in the key Speaking Responses Must be in English Must be understandable, even though it might require some effort on your part to comprehend Key gives the TA a sample of the quality and quantity of language expected in the correct response. It does not include all possible correct responses Use these guidelines and your best judgment to determine if a response is appropriate or not

28 Listening and Speaking Scoring Sheet
1 2 3 Provide full page handouts of sample score sheet for participants. 28

29 Provide full page handouts of sample score sheet for participants.
29

30 Administering the Reading Component

31 Layout Reading component is divided into 5 parts (Parts A–E)
Corresponding page numbers for the Picture Cue booklet are listed in the heading of each Part Brief orientation to the task is included If a child responds incorrectly to the first task, model the correct response, score the item 0, and move on to the next task If a child responds correctly, score the item 1, and move on to the next task The script contains detailed directions on which picture prompt/page of the picture cue book corresponds to each scripted item. The script also directs you to point to various items when appropriate, and each Part concludes with criteria for advancement. For example, “If student scores at least 2 items correctly; continue to Part B; if not, end the test by saying: “(prompt provided in script)” Remember, this is an adaptive test so at each transition point you will make a determination about whether the child will continue. 31

32 Navigating the Reading Component: Parts A–E
Administer and score all tasks in Part A. Calculate the score Based on the scoring guidelines in the script, determine whether the student will advance to the next Part or wind down Repeat steps 1–3 for Parts B through E as necessary Note: Follow the script for winding down at the end of Part E 32

33 Reading Script Example Script Layout
Reading script is in the same format as the Listening, Speaking, and Writing script Example Script Layout 33

34 Reading: Part A Matching Symbols
Students are directed to look at the symbol at the top of the page Next the student is asked to point to the picture below that matches Part A example: “Point to the picture that is the same.”

35 Reading: Part B Identifying Letters
Students are directed to point to various letters that are accompanied by a picture of something that starts with that letter Part B example: “Point to the letter B.”

36 Reading: Part C Reading Words
The Test Administrator will first point to the word Students are asked to find the picture that goes with the word provided Part C example: “Find the picture that goes with this word.”

37 Reading: Part D Reading Phrases
Students are asked to read the phrase on the page (that the TA points to) Students are then asked to point to the corresponding picture, as a comprehension check Part D example: “Read these words and then point to the picture that shows this.” The student is then asked to point to the corresponding picture, as a comprehension check, to make sure that in addition to decoding well, s/he really knows what the words mean. Note that the student does NOT have to read the phrase out loud.

38 Reading: Part E Reading Sentences
Students are asked to read the sentence on the page (that the TA points to) Students are then asked to point to the picture that corresponds to the sentence Part E example: “Here is a sentence. Point to the picture that shows this.” Note that the student does NOT have to read the phrase out loud.

39 Scoring Information When scoring the Reading section, the student must correctly match the prompt to the correct response in order to be scored correct. Part A: students must identify pictures Part B: students must identify letters Part C: students must identify words Part D: students must identify phrases Part E: students must identify sentences Students are allowed, but not required, to read the letters, words, etc. out loud or to sound them out in order to complete the task. Test Administrators indicate correct answers on the scoring sheet in the same way they have for Listening and Speaking.

40 Reading Scoring Sheet Criteria for advancement from part A to Part B, Part B to Part C, and so on… Although the Listening/Speaking part of the Kindergarten W-APT results in a proficiency score of low, mid, high, or exceptional, the Reading and Writing sections provide only diagnostic information. The results on the Reading and Writing sections of the test reflect the degree to which a student is able to demonstrate the literacy skills described in the chart on the following slide. Use the chart to translate the raw score for Reading (from page 2 of the Kindergarten W‑APT scoring sheet) into a skill description about a student's reading ability.

41 Reading Skills Chart Reading Raw Score Skill(s) Description 0-2
No demonstrable ability 3-5 Can match simple pictures to each other 6-10 Can recognize letters 11-12 Can recognize words 13 Can read simple phrases 14-15 Can read simple sentences Although the Listening/Speaking part of the Kindergarten W-APT results in a proficiency score of low, mid, high, or exceptional, the Reading and Writing sections provide only diagnostic information. The results on the Reading and Writing sections of the test reflect the degree to which a student is able to demonstrate the literacy skills described in this chart. Use this chart to translate the raw score for Reading (from page 2 of the Kindergarten W‑APT scoring sheet) into a skill description about a student's reading ability. 41

42 Administering the Writing Component

43 Layout Writing component is divided into 5 parts (Parts A–E)
Corresponding page numbers for the Picture Cue booklet are listed in the heading of each Part If a child responds incorrectly to the first task, model the correct response, score the item 0, and move on to the next task If a child responds correctly, score the item 1, and move on to the next task The script contains detailed directions on which picture prompt/page of the picture cue book corresponds to each scripted item. The script also directs you to point to various items when appropriate, and each Part concludes with criteria for advancement. For example, “If student scores at least 2 or more correct, go to Part B; if not, end the test by saying: “(prompt provided in script)” Remember, this is an adaptive test so at each transition point you will make a determination about whether the child will continue. 43

44 Navigating the Writing Component: Parts A–E
Administer and score all tasks in Part A. Calculate the score Based on the scoring guidelines in the script, determine whether the student will advance to the next Part or wind down Repeat steps 1–3 for Parts B through E as necessary Note: Follow the script for winding down at the end of Part E 44

45 Writing Script Example Script Layout
Writing script is in the same format as the Listening/Speaking and Reading scripts Example Script Layout

46 Writing: Part A, Task 1 The student is asked to write his or her name

47 Scoring Part A, Task 1 Sample 1 Score as CORRECT Letters are all well-formed and easily recognizable. Sample 2 Letter shapes must be recognizable and approximate the expected letter. If the student writes the incorrect letter in the space, it should be scored incorrect. Score as CORRECT The sequencing of last letters is difficult to recognize, but letter shapes are clearly identifiable.

48 Scoring Part A, Task 1 Sample 3 Score as INCORRECT
Student simply copied “My name” and did not write her own name. Letter “n” is not easily recognizable outside of context.

49 Writing: Part A, Task 2–4 Next the student must copy words onto the lines. Task #2 can be used to model the correct response if a child responds incorrectly to the task. Score the item 0, and move on to the next task.

50 Scoring Part A, Task 2–4 Sample 1 Score all tasks as CORRECT
Letters are all appropriately formed and recognizable. Letters are in correct order. Letter shapes must be recognizable and approximate the expected letter. If the student writes the incorrect letter in the space, it should be scored incorrect. Please note: Item #3 was replaced and items were renumbered after the field test from which this writing sample was taken. “Hen” has been replaced with “fox” on the operational Kindergarten W-APT.

51 Writing: Part B, Tasks 5–8 Next you will show the child familiar objects accompanied by the names of those objects The child must select and copy the first letter of each word from the Letter Box. 51

52 Scoring Part B, Tasks 5–8 Sample 1 Score tasks 4 and 7 CORRECT
Score tasks 5 and 6 as INCORRECT Letter shapes are recognizable (though “s” in “sun” is reversed). Initial letter in 5 and 6 are inappropriate. 52

53 Writing: Part C, Tasks 9–12 Next the student is asked to write the names of toys in the room pictured

54 Scoring Part C, Tasks 9–12 Score all responses in both samples as CORRECT All responses are well-formed and correct. Response 1 in sample 2 uses invented spelling (“kit” for “kite”), but this is acceptable. 54

55 Writing: Part D, Tasks 13–15 Next the student is asked to write about each picture.

56 Scoring Part D, Tasks 13–15 Sample 1 Score practice task as CORRECT
With some effort the writing can be seen to represent the phrase “help mommy” Word boundaries assist in interpreting the writing as containing multiple words Score task 1 as INCORRECT Only with considerable effort can the student’s response be interpreted to mean “They’re reading.” Misspellings or missing words are acceptable, but not if word boundaries are not indicated Writing must be a phrase or sentence of more than one word. Misspellings or missing words are acceptable as long as the response is generally comprehensible. 56

57 Writing: Part E, Tasks 16–18 Next the student is asked to write a sentence about each picture

58 Scoring Part E, Task 16–18 Score both items as CORRECT Sample 1
Word boundaries and use of punctuation facilitate comprehension. The interpretation of the first task in the sample (“My family is playing.”) is easily seen. The interpretation of the second task in the sample (“It is hot.”) is less obvious than in the first task, but still apparent. Missing the word (“it”) is acceptable. Sample 1 Writing must be a sentence of more than a single word or phrase. Misspellings or missing words are acceptable as long as the response is generally comprehensible. 58

59 Scoring Part E, Task 16–18 Score both items as CORRECT Sample 2
Word boundaries and use of punctuation facilitate comprehension The interpretation of the first task in sample 2 (“Lee’s family is on the farm.”) is evident, in spite of misspellings (“from” for “farm”) and incorrect preposition (“in” rather than “on”) The interpretation of the second task in sample 2 (“Lee’s family is looking at a book.”) is evident Misspellings (“famlie” for “family”) and missing function words (“is” and “a”) do not significantly impede meaning Sample 2 Writing must be a sentence of more than a single word or phrase. Misspellings or missing words are acceptable as long as the response is generally comprehensible. 59

60 Scoring Information When scoring the writing section, inventive spelling and reversed letters are acceptable Letters and words should be generally recognizable Scribbles do not count

61 Writing Test Scoring Guidelines
Part A and Part B Letter shapes must be recognizable and approximate the expected letter. If the student writes the incorrect letter in the space, it should be scored incorrect. Part C Writing must be a word or approximate a word, not just one letter. Words copied from the sample should be scored incorrect. Part D Writing must be a phrase or sentence of more than one word. Misspellings or missing words are acceptable as long as the response is generally comprehensible. Part E Writing must be a sentence of more than a single word or phrase. Misspellings or missing words are acceptable as long as the response is generally comprehensible. 61

62 Writing Scoring Sheet Use the chart on the next slide to translate the raw score for Writing (from page 3 of the Kindergarten W-APT scoring sheet) into a skill description about a student's writing ability.

63 Writing Skills Chart Writing Raw Score Skill(s) Description 0-3
No ability 4-7 Can copy letters 8-11 Can complete simple words with initial letter 12-14 Can write simple words 15-16 Can write simple phrases 17-18 Can write simple sentences Use the chart above to translate the raw score for Writing (from page 3 of the Kindergarten W-APT scoring sheet) into a skill description about a student's writing ability. 63

64 Summary Scoring When you have finished administering those parts of the test that are appropriate for each student, transfer his or her raw scores to the Summary Scoring Sheet Use the conversion table to fill in the Oral Proficiency Score Locate the student’s Reading and Writing Skill(s) Descriptions in the appropriate Conversion Table

65 Raw score for Listening and Speaking Reading Skills Descriptions
Summary Scoring Sheet Raw score for Reading Raw score for Listening and Speaking Raw score for Writing For Reading and Writing, it is important to note that a student provided a specific raw score can perform the corresponding skills at that level , as well as all skills associated with lower raw scores. For example, a student receiving a raw score of 11 can perform the skill indicator appropriate for that score (e.g., “Can complete simple words with initial letter”) and the skills associated with lower scores (e.g., “Can copy letters,” etc.). Oral Proficiency Score Writing Skills Descriptions Reading Skills Descriptions 65

66 Interpreting Kindergarten W-APT Scores
Qualification and program placement decisions are always subject to state and local policy, guidelines, and resources. If the W-APT is being used as a criterion to determine eligibility for and placement in ELL services, follow the established procedures in your district and state for interpreting the score for these purposes. WIDA advocates using multiple measures of student language proficiency and academic achievement to determine eligibility and placement in ELL services. For additional information see the ACCESS for ELLs® Interpretive Guide to Score Reports at

67 How to Use Kindergarten W-APT Scores in Our State
<Insert state policy here.> <Insert a visual flowchart/diagram where applicable to explain placement decision processes in your state.>

68 Questions or Comments? For more information, please contact the WIDA Help Desk: or World Class Instructional Design and Assessment, Center for Applied Linguistics, MetriTech, Inc., © 2011 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, on behalf of the WIDA Consortium


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