Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Developing Potentials for Learning: Evidence, assessment, and progress John Hattie Visible Learning Lab University of Auckland New Zealand EARLI 2007.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Developing Potentials for Learning: Evidence, assessment, and progress John Hattie Visible Learning Lab University of Auckland New Zealand EARLI 2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing Potentials for Learning: Evidence, assessment, and progress John Hattie Visible Learning Lab University of Auckland New Zealand EARLI 2007

2 Three parts to the story 1.To identify major influences on achievement (using 700+ meta-analyses) 2.To outline an assessment model based on these influences 3.To demonstrate the power and joy of Educational Psychology

3 Influences on Achievement ? DecreasedEnhancedZero 0

4 Reducing Class Size on Achievement? DecreasedEnhancedZero 0 What is the effect of reducing class size Hundreds of evaluations of reducing class size ….

5 Effect on Achievement over time? DecreasedEnhanced Zero 0.20 Reducing Class Size 1.0 An effect-size of advancing achievement9 mths3 yrs % improving rate of learning10% 45% r variable & achievement % of students with treatment exceeding those not treated834

6 The typical influence on achievement So what is the typical effect across 750+ meta-analysis 50,000 studies, and 200+ million students

7 Effect on Achievement over time? Decreased Enhanced Zero 0.20 Typical Effect Size

8 Distribution of effects

9 Influences on Achievement REVERSE Developmental Effects Typical Teacher Effects ZONE OF DESIRED EFFECTS

10 Rank these 11 effects: Reducing disruptive behavior in the class Feedback Acceleration of gifted students Reading Recovery Integrated curriculum programs Homework Individualized instruction Ability grouping Open vs. traditional classes Retention (holding back a year) Shifting schools (from 1 = highest effect to 11 = lowest effect)

11 Rank these 11 effects: Answers Reducing disruptive behavior in the class.86 Feedback.72 Acceleration of gifted students.60 Reading Recovery.50 Integrated curriculum programs.40 Homework.30 Individualized instruction.20 Ability grouping.10 Open vs. traditional classes.00 Retention (hold back a year) -.16 Shifting schools -.34

12 Major domains of interest Curricula Home School Student Teacher Teaching

13 The Disasters... RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 100Mobility (shifting schools) Retention Television Summer vacation Open vs. traditional Multi-grade/age classes Inductive teaching Reading: Whole language Perceptual-motor programs Out of school experiences

14 The Well belows... RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 90Distance education Web based learning Ability grouping Teacher training Diet on achievement Teacher subject matter knowledge Gender (girls – boys) Multi-media methods Problem based learning Home-school programmes14.16

15 Not Worth it yet... RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 80Extra-curricula programs Family structure Co-/team teaching Learning hierarchies Aptitude/treatment interactions Individualised instruction Charter schools Religious schools Class size Teaching test taking

16 Typical average teacher territory... RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 70Finances Summer school Competitive learning Programmed instruction Within class grouping Mainstreaming Desegregation Exercise/relaxation Audio-based teaching Home visiting by teachers

17 Close to average RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 60Reducing anxiety Principals/school leaders on student achievement Ability grouping for gifted students Homework Inquiry based teaching Simulations and gaming Reading: Exposure to reading Bilingual programs Teacher positive expectations Computer assisted instruction

18 Average … RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 50Enrichment on gifted Integrated curriculum programs Adjunct aids Hypermedia instruction Behavioral organisers/adjunct questions Self-concept on achievement Frequent/effects of testing Early intervention Motivation on learning Small group learning

19 Getting there … RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 40Questioning Cooperative learning Reading: Second/third chance programs Play programs Visual based/audio-visual teaching Outdoor programs Concept mapping Peer influences Keller's mastery learning program Reading: Phonics instruction

20 Lets have them.... RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 30 Reading: Visual-perception programs Parental Involvement Peer tutoring Goals - challenging Mastery learning Social skills programs Socio-economic status Home environment Providing worked examples Reading: Comprehension programs

21 Exciting …. RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 20Direct instruction Time on task Study skills Acceleration of gifted Problem solving teaching Teacher professional development on student achievement Reading: Repeated reading programs Reading: Vocabulary programs Meta-cognition strategies Teaching students self- verbalisation

22 The Winners... RankCategoryInfluenceStudiesEffectsES 1Self-report grades Absence of disruptive students Classroom behavioural Quality of teaching Reciprocal teaching Prior achievement Teacher-student relationships Feedback Providing formative evaluation to teachers Creativity programs

23 Various Influences MetasStudiesPeopleEffectsESse Teacher 292,052.5m5, Curricula 1356,8927m29, Teaching 34424,90652m50, Student 13310,7357m37, Home 311,99810m3, School 964,0194m13, Average 76850,60282/241m*140,

24 Identifying what matters Percentage of Achievement Variance Students Teachers Home Peers Schools Principal

25 Visible teaching & Visible learning What some teachers do! In active, calculated and meaningful ways Providing multiple opportunities & alternatives Teaching learning strategies Around surface and deep learning That leads to students constructing learning

26 Visible Teaching – Visible Learning

27 Teachers Clear learning intentions Challenging success criteria Range of learning strategies Know when students are not progressing Providing feedback Visibly learns themselves

28 Students … Understand learning intentions Are challenged by success criteria Develop a range of learning strategies Know when they are not progressing Seek feedback Visibly teach themselves

29 The Contrast An active teacher, passionate for their subject and for learning, a change agent OR A facilitative, inquiry or discovery based provider of engaging activities

30 Activator or Facilitator ?

31

32 Teaching or Working Conditions?

33 An emphasis on learning strategies NSNEES Creativity Programs Teaching student self-verbalization Meta-cognition strategies Problem solving teaching Study skills Concept mapping Motivation on learning

34 Message for Learning Balance of surface, deep, & constructed knowing Teachers preach deep, students see surface! Learning strategies To reduce cognitive load To use when stuck (welcome error!) Requires deliberative practice Builds expectations of can do Thrives on challenge Requires feedback

35 Self Regulation Need surface and deep to maximize meta-cognition Involves questioning our constructions of knowledge & knowing Requires highly structured or direct teaching Is the heart of Visible learning and Visible teaching

36 Some worrying details

37 Assessment and Feedback

38 Assessment… InfluenceEffect Size Self-report grades1.44 Feedback.72 Providing formative evaluation to teachers.70 Frequent/ Effects of testing.46 Teaching test taking skills.22

39 Teaching/Teachers needs to be evidence based Whether their teaching methods have been successful or not Whether their learning intentions are worthwhile & challenging Whether students are attaining their desired success criteria Which students have learnt or not learnt Where teachers can capitalize on student strengths & minimize gaps Where students are on the learning ladder Whether they have a shared conception of progress What is optimal to teach next Whenever we test in classes it is primarily to help teachers know:

40 Priority to maximize FEEDBACK to THE TEACHER Feedback is information provided by an agent (e.g., teacher, peer, book, parent, self/experience) regarding aspects of ones performance or understanding.

41 Purpose of feedback provide alternative strategies to understand material increase effort, motivation or engagement confirm that the responses are correct or incorrect indicate that more information is available or needed point to directions that could be pursued to restructure understandings

42 Feedback is evidence about: Where am I going? How am I going? Where to next?

43 Enhancing Learning Gap How ??? Levels

44 Summary of effect-sizes relating to types of feedback (adapted from Kluger & DeNisi, 1996) ModeratorNo.ES Correct feedbackTis correct Tis incorrect197.25

45 Summary of effect-sizes relating to types of feedback (adapted from Kluger & DeNisi, 1996) ModeratorNo.ES Correct feedbackTis correct Tis incorrect FB about changes from previous trialsYes50.55 No380.28

46 Summary of effect-sizes relating to types of feedback (adapted from Kluger & DeNisi, 1996) Moderator No.ES Correct feedbackTis correct Tis incorrect FB about changes from Yes50.55 previous trials No FB designed to Yes discourage student No388.33

47 Summary of effect-sizes relating to types of feedback (adapted from Kluger & DeNisi, 1996) ModeratorNo.ES Correct feedbackTis correct Tis incorrect FB about changes from Yes50.55 previous trials No FB designed to discourage Yes the student No Praise FBYes80.09 No358.34

48 Summary of effect-sizes relating to types of feedback (adapted from Kluger & DeNisi, 1996) ModeratorNo.ES Correct feedbackTis correct Tis incorrect FT about changes from previous trials Yes50.55 No FT designed to discourage the studentYes No Praise FTYes80.09 No No. of times FT was Lots97.32 provided Little171.39

49 Summary of effect-sizes relating to types of feedback (adapted from Kluger & DeNisi, 1996) ModeratorNo.ES Correct feedbackTis correct Tis incorrect FB about changes from previous trialsYes50.55 No FB designed to discourage the studentYes No Praise FBYes80.09 No No. of times FB was providedLots97.32 Little Goal settingDifficult goals37.51 Easy, do your best goals373.30

50 Thus … Provide correct feedback.43 About previous attempts.55 Related to more difficult goals.51 That does not discourage.33 or threaten their self-esteem.47

51 Assessment and Feedback: asTTle (Assessment Tools for Teaching and Learning)

52 What is Visible Learning? Where are we going? related to both the rich ideas underlying the curricula, and to the desired levels of proficiency as expected by the National Curricula; How are we going ? current status of performance comparable to appropriate (similar sub-) groups, and to expected performance; Where to next? directions related to future teaching, learning, curriculum innovations, and system policies. Visible Learning is about Feedback

53 What is Visible Learning ? 53 Critical Infrastructure for the Knowledge Economy

54 What is Visible Learning ? A language for progression

55 What is Visible Learning ? Empowerment of Teachers in collaborative ways

56 Welcome screen for Teachers

57 Customize a test

58 Choose Curriculum Strands

59 Choose difficulty

60

61 Paper and Pencil Administered On screen Administered Computer adaptive On screen

62 Create a test

63 Welcome screen for Teachers

64

65 Individual Learning Pathways

66 Group Learning Pathway

67 Curriculum Level Report

68 Progress Report

69 What Next Report Diagnostic advancement and appropriately targeted online references

70 Student Welcome Screen

71 Student Test

72 Other research options Computer adaptive sequential testing Interactive video for assessing reading efficacy Target Setting Integrated with school student management system Evaluating teachers skill in estimating difficulty Progression maps in curricula The Human Computer Interactions – mode effects Linear programming Open-ended scoring combining technology and teachers How students read screens, effects of scrolling Available (free and voluntary) for all NZ schools Used in elementary & secondary schools If teachers talk about the technology, we have failed If teachers talk to each other about teaching, we have succeeded

73 Developing Potentials for Learning: Evidence, assessment, and progress 1.Identify major influences on achievement: Feedback, Challenge, and Learning Strategies All effects are relative to the.40 typical value 2.Outline an assessment model based on these influences: An emphasis of feedback to the teacher 3.To demonstrate the power and joy of Educational Psychology

74 Developing Potentials for Learning: Evidence, assessment, and progress John Hattie Visible Learning Lab University of Auckland New Zealand EARLI 2007


Download ppt "Developing Potentials for Learning: Evidence, assessment, and progress John Hattie Visible Learning Lab University of Auckland New Zealand EARLI 2007."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google