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Measurement of the Knowledge-driven Economy Rachel Granger Dept. Geography, Environment & Disaster Management September 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "Measurement of the Knowledge-driven Economy Rachel Granger Dept. Geography, Environment & Disaster Management September 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Measurement of the Knowledge-driven Economy Rachel Granger Dept. Geography, Environment & Disaster Management September 2008

2 Summary •Interest in the way the KDE is recognised and measured •Associated impacts •Possible solutions ‘a collection of economic activities, which in isolation or combination are mobilised in the pursuit of knowledge development ‘

3 We recognise knowledge as… •Product of: –Incremental learning and cumulative idea development –Economic transactions –Networking and social relations •Abstractions: –K as Innovation (Evolut & Instit Economics) –Learning Economy (Constructed K) –Social Capital (Relational Geog, Actor-network)

4 What are the issues? Unprecedented debate about K and KDE  K permeating society and economy…yet •Propulsive K sectors e.g. science, technology, creative industries are evidence of KDE •K portrayed as inputs (skills, R&D) and outputs (innovation) to the K process …restricted and biased view?

5 Knowledge Process INPUTS  Information R&D Programmes Investment Skilled Workers KNOWLEDGE PROCESS Knowledge Absorption Knowledge Production Knowledge Transmission  OUTPUTS New Information Innovation Patents Products New Processes Knowledge Mobilisation

6 Issues: empirical research •Rich research on economic value KDE and some infrastructure, but weaker (empirical) insights of K Process itself •KDE conceptualised as complex process but presented empirically as a linear process and as inputs and outputs

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8 “ Recent debate has been handicapped by a high degree of abstraction coupled with a scarcity of fine-grained empirical analysis in which to support sound conceptual advancement” (Gertler, 2005) “ It remains difficult to relate abstract concepts and generalisations about social phenomena to a particular place, time and actions of individuals” (Thrift, 1996)

9 Operational issues •Interchangeable use of K and: science, innovation, technology, information •Scale – Territorial and organisational K rather than people! (K is proprietary) •Differentiation between: Codified/Tacit K, Information/Knowledge •Invisible K Flows – TK can be invisible, unconscious, undeclarative •Measurement apparatus

10 Knowledge Mobilisation •Use of social approaches e.g. relational geography to ‘unpick’ and ‘enrich’ understanding of the nuances of the K process •Focus on people as K workers, carriers, investors, brokers •Multi-dimensional model – multi K types and formats to ensure balanced but nuanced understanding

11 Knowledge Mobilisation 1.Physical competences (Attribute) 2.Episodic K (Attribute) 3.K Application (Activity) 4.Personal K Development (Activity) - learning 5.Global K Development (Activity)- creativity 6.K Brokering (Activity)

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13 Alternative Approach •K Mobilisation (activity, multi-dimensional) rather than inputs and outputs •Use of a spectrum – not as dichotomous forms •Use qualitative methodology to unpick e.g. relational geography (process, people) e.g. How do workers: –Use of information –Value of conferences –Use of skills and experience –Project teams/team working –Learning

14 Alternative Approach: KMD Case Study: •Knowledge Mobilisation Dynamic •Relational Geography •Less obvious sector: architecture with lots of TK and CK •Aimed at (i) workers i.e. architects


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