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How Students Learn Science: Faculty Discussion 1 364: PRACTICES OF SCIENCE Sally Blake.

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Presentation on theme: "How Students Learn Science: Faculty Discussion 1 364: PRACTICES OF SCIENCE Sally Blake."— Presentation transcript:

1 How Students Learn Science: Faculty Discussion 1 364: PRACTICES OF SCIENCE Sally Blake

2 Class Outline How People Learn Science Teacher Preconceptions/Misconceptions About Science Principle I. Preconceptions

3 How People Learn: New Principles About Learning Principle 1: Preconceptions Understanding based on everyday experiences may reinforce misconceptions about science. Most preconceptions are reasonable.

4 A Private Universe Jot down your answers to the following questions. Question 1. What causes the seasons? Question 2. What makes day and night? This video explains some of the preconceptions students and teachers have about science. As you watch the video think about your answers to the above questions.

5 Preconceptions Based on what you learned in the video how do preconceptions develop? How do we change preconceptions in students? What are some preconceptions of teachers ?

6 Private Universe What did you learn about teaching from this video? Did the teacher have preconceptions about any of her students? What is your evidence?

7 Preconceptions about Inquiry Teachers: I do teach through inquiry. I ask questions and have students answer questions. I have students look up terms in the glossary of the adopted text. We do science fair every year and the students have to follow the scientific method. Reality Teachers have preconceptions of what it means to teach using inquiry and it may not be what research considers inquiry learning. Professional Development may give sample activities without developing understanding of the process. Professors: Inquiry takes too long to teach. I have my notes on what is important and I need to make sure these students get the content. Reality Universities rarely use appropriate teaching methods in their courses. Most professors just lecture with little or no input from students. This modeling influences teachers ideas about how to teach and what should be assessed.

8 How People Learn: New Principles About Learning Principle 1: Preconceptions/Misconceptions a.Experimentation – experimentation is not a method of testing ideas but a method of trying things out or producing a certain outcome. Examples 1. The Scientific Method does not really exist in the world of science as used in schools. 2. Experimentation is EXPLORATORY and a PROCESS, more often wrong than right. 3. Experimentation is driven by inquiry, not end products. (What might happen if….?How does this work? Why does this happen? ) WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TO YOU? Talk to your team and list three things these ideas mean for teaching children science.

9 Principle 1: Preconceptions/Misconceptions Data – inference of casual relationships from single correlations NAEP

10 How People Learn: New Principles About Learning Principle 1: Preconceptions/Misconceptions a.Data – inference of casual relationships from single correlations Examples 1. National data reflects minority students from lower socioeconomic status families have a higher percentage of dropouts, special education classifications, less participation in science courses and careers, and lower paying jobs. Does this mean poor minority students cant do science? Does this mean poor minority students are bad in school? Does this mean poor minority students are mentally challenged? WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TO YOU? Talk to your partner and list three examples you have done or observed concerning this misconception.

11 How People Learn: New Principles About Learning Principle 1: Preconceptions /Misconceptions d. Arguments – accept arguments based on inadequate data Examples 1. Science kits like FOSS dont work because last year I used them every day and most of my students played the whole time. 2. Science investigations work with children from higher socioeconomic backgrounds but shouldnt be used with poor children. They need the basics first. WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TO YOU? Talk to your partner and list three examples you have done or you have observed concerning this misconception.

12 How People Learn: New Principles About Learning Principle 1: Preconceptions /Misconceptions Students Perceptions of Scientists and What it Means to do Science When you think of science what comes to mind? Take a minute to jot down your first thought about what science means. Quickly draw a picture of a scientist. Compare your picture with a peer.

13 Is your scientist a male? Does your scientist have glasses? Does your scientist have wild hair? Does your scientists have on a lab coat? Does you scientist appear to be deranged? Are the beakers in your picture? This famous test used as a research tool with thousands of young adults indicated that perceptions of scientists were male, nerdy, and in general mad. Do you think children have pre-conceived ideas about scientists?

14 How People Learn: New Principles About Learning Principle 1: Preconceptions /Misconceptions Sample: 4,5, and 6 year-old-children: (n=40) When: May, end of kindergarten year in a public Texas School

15 Images influence career decisions and study effort

16 Class Activity Egg Drop Send your Materials manager to bring two eggs and measuring device back to your group. Measure your eggs Hold one egg in the palm of your hand and try to break it by squeezing. What happens? Drop one egg from different heights (measuring and recording, of course)

17 Class Activity Egg Drop Work with your team to design an egg protector that will keep an egg from breaking when dropped from the balcony of the Art Building. Limitations You can use 2 yards of masking tape You can select five items from the materials table only for your design. You can alter this items any way you think best. You have 20 minutes to draw your design and construct your egg protector

18 Class Activity You must be able to explain the science concepts that influence your design. You must collect some form of data from this experiment. You will need to report out to the whole group, defend your statements and inferences based on your experiment. We will take 10 minutes to go outside and drop you eggs. Lets go.

19 Class Activity After hearing each groups development plan and activity results what can you infer about characteristics of a good egg protector and why? Include what misconceptions you had about egg protection

20 Questions


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