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June SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum. SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-on Activity Training TeachEngineering Hands-on Activity: * Egg-cellent.

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Presentation on theme: "June SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum. SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-on Activity Training TeachEngineering Hands-on Activity: * Egg-cellent."— Presentation transcript:

1 June SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum

2 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-on Activity Training TeachEngineering Hands-on Activity: * Egg-cellent Landing TeachEngineering Digital Library: teachengineering.org teachengineering.org wNews&NewsID=1481 od/resourcesforyou/Co nsumers/ucm ht m

3 TeachEngineering Digital Library The TeachEngineering digital library provides free, teacher-tested, standards-based engineering content for K-12 teachers to use in science and math classrooms. Engineering lessons connect real-world experiences with curricular content already taught in K-12 classrooms. Mapped to educational content standards, TeachEngineering's comprehensive curricula are hands-on, inexpensive, and relevant to children's daily lives. SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training

4 General Advice Be prepared! Do each activity beforehand Make sure all materials are available Keep students on task Follow the time frame Be flexible Have Fun!! SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training

5 Egg-cellent Landing The classic egg-drop experiment with an analogy to the Mars rover landing Engineering focus: o Engineering Design Process Students engage in the full engineering design process, which includes brainstorming, designing, building, testing, analyzing results, redesigning, etc. Learning objectives: o Identify several components of a Mars lander designed by engineers. o Design and build an egg-lander within a confined budget. o Define and understand terminal velocity. o Identify similarities and differences between their model lander design and the Mars Landing Spacecraft design. SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Full Activity on TeachEngineering

6 Suggested time: 50 minutes Suggested group size: 2 students/group Estimated Cost: Approx. $2/group Materials o Each group needs: One egg One Zip-Lock (or other "zipper" brand) sandwich bag Egg-cellent Lander Order Form o For the class: Styrofoam or plastic cups Low-density foam (available at most fabric stores) Pack of balloons Tape (masking or transparent) SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training mation/eggs/ucm htm Egg-cellent Landing r/recycle-the-holidays.asp

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8 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Engineering Connection (Real World Application): Through careful design and many experimental trials, engineers have developed ways to safely stop objects moving at high speeds. They incorporate into the design of moving objects cars, airplanes, trains, amusement park rides, bicycles components and devices that mitigate the effect of abrupt slow down; for example, bumpers, crumple zones, seat belts, air bags, shock absorbers or helmets. NASA engineers have developed a way to safely land Mars rovers when approaching the great Red Planet at speeds exceeding 12,000 mph! To slow down the spacecraft that is transporting the rover, engineers have designed a craft that includes an aeroshell, which in turn in comprised of a heat shield, a parachute, airbags, rockets and lander, among other important components. Egg-cellent Landing hp?id=PIA / html#axzz32BlpCqT3

9 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Vocabulary TermsDefinitions cruise stage The configuration of the spacecraft for travel between Earth and Mars. aeroshell The remaining spacecraft after its separation with the cruise stage. It is made up of two parts: a heat shield and a backshell. heat shield The brownish half of the aeroshell made to withstand temperatures as hot as the surface of the sun (1,447 °C or 2,637 °F). backshell The white half of the aeroshell which houses the parachute, airbags, rockets, lander, and rover. bridle Rope or chord-like tethers used to connect both the parachute and lander to the backshell. lander Shell with airbags which protects the rover while bouncing along the Mars surface. rover An unmanned vehicle sent to explore an unknown area. terminal velocity The velocity at which the drag force acting on a falling object balances out the weight of the object and prevents any further acceleration. Egg-cellent Landing

10 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Introduction: o Introduce the activity by discussing the Mars rover and the challenge in creating a safe landing for the rover on Mars. (The associated lesson Six Minutes of Terror provides more background information.):Six Minutes of Terror To slow down the spacecraft that is transporting the Mars rover, engineers have designed an aeroshell, which in turn in comprised of a heat shield, a parachute, airbags, rockets and lander. Once the heat shield has done its part in effectively bringing the lander to a vertical stop 40 to 50 feet above the ground, the bridle that tethers the lander to the aeroshell's backshell is cut, and the lander surrounded with airbags and containing the rover inside free falls to the Martian surface and bounces its way to a stop. The Egg-cellent Landing activity simulates the free-falling lander and its subsequent bouncing that occurs before it finally stops. However, since the experiment will be done on Earth and not on Mars, we can take advantage of Earth's thicker atmosphere. Egg-cellent Landing

11 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Introduction (cont.): o Introduce terminal velocity: Objects accelerate as they fall. However, falling objects experience drag, which is friction caused by the atmosphere. As an object falls faster, drag increases. Eventually, the drag balances out the weight of the object and prevents any further acceleration. The object will then continue to fall at a constant speed known as its terminal velocity. A good visual example of terminal velocity is to drop an inflated balloon, which will fall at a very slow rate. Terminal velocity is affected by the aerodynamics and weight of an object. If an object is not aerodynamic, it will experience more drag than an aerodynamic object. Also, a heavier object will have a faster terminal velocity than a lighter object with the same aerodynamics. Finally, the atmosphere and gravity have a secondary affect on terminal velocity since the weight of an object will depend on the gravity, and the drag acting on the object depends on the atmosphere. Egg-cellent Landing

12 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Before the Activity: 1.Gather all necessary materials. 2.Make enough copies of the Egg-cellent Lander Order Form for each group to have one copy.Egg-cellent Lander Order Form 3.Designate a testing area with a hard landing surface (i.e., tile or concrete) to drop the student's egg-landers (a balcony, window, or even a ladder work perfectly). Egg-cellent Landing

13 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Activity Procedure: The objective of this exercise is for students to design an egg-lander within constraints to keep an egg from breaking when it hits the ground from a significant height. The landers are allowed to bounce when they hit the ground. 1.Challenge each student group to design a safe landing craft for their raw egg. 2.Explain to the students that each group only has $1 to purchase materials. 3.Pass out one Egg-cellent Lander Order Form to each group.Egg-cellent Lander Order Form 4.The groups should sketch their design on their order form before they pick up their materials. 5.Pass out one egg to each group. Have the groups immediately place their egg in a zipper bag to prevent any accidental messes. 6.Allow the groups time to build their egg-landers. 7.Test the egg-landers in the designated area. A group will have successfully completed the mission if their egg remains unbroken after the fall. 8.(optional) Allow groups to redesign their egg-landers, using up to an additional $1 worth of materials. Students should repeat steps 4-7 based on their redesign. Egg-cellent Landing

14 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Assessment: o Pre-Activity Assessment o Brainstorming: Ask students to come up with some ideas on how to safely land a delicate falling object like an egg. (Possible answers may include: padding or foam, airbags or balloons, springs, parachutes, etc.) o Question/Answer: Ask students and discuss as a class: What two types of engineers would most likely work on building a lander for a delicate and expensive falling object like a Mars rover? (Answer: aerospace and mechanical engineers) o Activity Embedded Assessment o Velocity Calculation: When falling, a balloon will immediately reach its terminal velocity. Drop a fully inflated balloon from 5 feet and record the time it takes to hit the ground. Have students calculate its terminal velocity by the simple equation, Velocity = Distance ÷ Time If it took 3.1 seconds to fall 5 feet, your answer would look like: Velocity = 5 feet / 3.1 s = 1.6 ft/s Egg-cellent Landing

15 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Assessment (cont.): o Post-Activity Assessment o Show and Tell: Have students "show and tell" to the rest of the class their egg-cellent landers. Have students explain the best part of their design and what could go wrong with it (and what could be fixed in future models). Remind students that engineers go through the deign/build/redesign process many times before they arrive at a finished product. o Velocity Evaluation: To reinforce the concept of aerodynamics and weight affecting terminal velocity, have students predict the outcome of the following two cases: If the balloon used in the Embedded Assessment was only inflated one-half the amount and still dropped from a 5 ft. height, would it hit the ground in more or less time? Would its terminal velocity be slower or faster? (Answer: The balloon would take less time to hit the ground, and its terminal velocity would be faster. Because the balloon has a smaller area when it is deflated, it will experience less drag.) If a coin were taped to the fully inflated balloon to add more weight and dropped from a 5 ft. height, would it hit the ground in more or less time than the inflated balloon without the coin? Would its terminal velocity be slower or faster? (Answer: The balloon would take less time to hit the ground and its terminal velocity would be faster. A heavier item has a faster terminal velocity than a light item of the same aerodynamics.) o Problem Solving: Have students engage in open discussion to suggest solutions to the question: We performed the egg-lander experiment on Earth rather than on Mars where the atmosphere is much thinner. What problem could this present if we tested our designs on Mars? (Answer: Because the atmosphere is so thin, the lander would not come close to reaching its terminal velocity, which is very fast. Instead, it would keep gaining speed while falling until it finally hits the ground.) Egg-cellent Landing

16 SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Teaching tips: o Emphasize the science concepts, vocabulary, and engineering connection; reinforce these throughout the activity. o (optional) Have each group determine the cost of their egg-landers and compare costs. The group with a successful egg-lander for the lowest cost could be recognized as a winning team. o Placing the raw eggs into zipper bags at the start of this activity helps minimize any nasty clean-up when the students drop their landers. o When the activity is done, dispose of the eggs into an outside receptacle or a waste bin that will be emptied shortly, since raw eggs do not smell good when left out of refrigeration for a while. o Be sure to have students wash their hands if they touch any broken egg. Egg-cellent Landing

17 Activity Takeaways Teambuilding skills o Working together on this design, build and test activity, making decisions about materials based on cost and effectiveness. Engineering skills o Engineering Design Process : brainstorming, designing, building, testing, analyzing results, redesign, retest, etc. SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Encouragement through hands-on learning o Students learn about the Mars rover and physics concepts, such as drag and terminal velocity. Motivation through having fun o Introduce the activity as a fun learning experience!

18 TeachEngineering Contact Information TeachEngineering: o over 1,300 standards-based engineering lessons and activities Carleigh Samson, TeachEngineering Editor o o SHPE Foundation SHPE Jr. Chapter Curriculum Hands-On Activity Training Questions?

19 College Prep Activity: What Type of Student Am I? (3 part lesson)

20 What type of Student Am I? This lesson will help students : Reflect on what it takes to be a successful student. Explore what resources they need to be successful and how to access them. Students will: Understand skills and resources needed to be successful in school. Learn how important it is to prioritize and manage their time Be instructed in the importance of being proactive and engaged in their education

21 What type of Student Am I? Optional Pre-Activity: What Type of Student Am I Pre-Activity Quiz June Activity: What time is it? July Activity: I Need Help! August Activity: Multiple Intelligences and Reflection Activity

22 What Type of Student Am I? (Part 1 of 3) Give students the What Time Is It? handout and discuss the concept of time management and the importance of planning. Have students come up with examples of when poor time management or planning has caused them or others problems. Talk about the importance of knowing what your resources are and how to use them to make you a better student.

23 Soft Skills Activity

24 Communication Listen Hear!! This activity is designed to get participants to think about the importance of two-way communication Students conduct an activity which evaluates their ability to follow instructions. Whats your Point? This activity will help participants to understand the importance of being specific when offering and receiving communication. Students will conduct role plays to demonstrate the value of being specific in communication to others and in what is received from others.

25 Announcements SHPE Jr. Chapter Information for Form – Brief form online to provide SHPE Foundation with SHPE Jr. Chapter contact information for upcoming academic year (please complete by May 30) SHPE Jr. Chapter Stoles – Order forms are being accepting now. Stoles must be ordered by 3 weeks in advance of the graduation date. Stoles only for official members (http://www.shpefoundation.org/shpejr/)


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