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City of Atlanta Mayors Office of Sustainability Power to Change: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Update Presented to: Speaker David Ralston, Speaker of the Georgia.

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Presentation on theme: "City of Atlanta Mayors Office of Sustainability Power to Change: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Update Presented to: Speaker David Ralston, Speaker of the Georgia."— Presentation transcript:

1 City of Atlanta Mayors Office of Sustainability Power to Change: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Update Presented to: Speaker David Ralston, Speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives June 21,

2 2 Types of Electric Vehicles Electric Vehicles on the RoadDescription Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid electric vehicles use a small electric battery to supplement the standard internal combustion engine, providing increased fuel efficiency. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Plug-in hybrids can run on electric power only up to about 40 mph, at which time the internal combustion engine takes over. It is possible to use only the electric system to commute around a city and not engage the internal combustion engine. Extended Range Electric VehicleExtended range electric vehicles have a small battery that powers the drive train. The battery typically has a range of about 40 miles. After the battery is exhausted a gas engine powers a generator, which in turn charges the battery. Battery Electric Vehicles Battery electric vehicles are all electric, have no internal combustion engine and are totally dependent on plugging into the electric power grid. They accommodate a ranges of plus miles per charge. Chevy Volt Nissan LEAF Ford Focus Electric Ford Fusion Hybrid Toyota Prius Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid Wheego LiFe

3 3 Cost of Vehicle, Distance per Charge, Time to Charge? TypeRanges Toyota Prius Plug-in20 miles on battery; 300+ with gas motor GM Volt40 miles on battery; 300+ with battery and gasoline generator Nissan Leaf, Ford Focus ElectricApprox. 100 miles Charger TypeTime Level 1 (120 Volts)8-12 hours Level 2 (240 Volts)4-6 hours Direct Current Fast Charge (480 Volts)80% charge in about 30 minutes CarCost (MSRP) Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid$27,000 GM Volt$40,280 Ford Focus Electric$34,250 Nissan Leaf$32,780

4 4 PEVs Meet the Needs of Most Commuters 85% of people commute 50 miles or less roundtrip per day to work Source: US Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Omnibus Household Survey (2003) Charging at work can double the range of electric vehicles. Utilities in Georgia have developed super off peak rates to incentivize plug-in electric vehicle owners to utilize energy wells available in the evening.

5 5 Why Electric Transportation In 2008 the State of Georgia motor gasoline expenditures exceeded $14 Billion; No crude oil is produced in Georgia A $1 increase would result an extra $4 billion wealth export from Georgia residents Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Petroleum Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Energy resourceProduced in GeorgiaForeign Import Energy costs per 100 miles traveled National Average $3.40 ( at $0.10 per kWh) $13.33 ($4.00/gal at 30mpg) Energy costs per 100 miles traveled Georgia Power PEV Super Off Peak Rate $2.01 ( at $0.059 per kWh) $13.33 ($4.00/gal at 30mpg) Fuel Rate StabilityHistorically SteadyExtremely Volatile

6 Driving Mass Adoption of EVs and their Role in Economic Development Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) present an opportunity for Georgia to lead in an industry that promises to reinvigorate the State by introducing a new sector for jobs and economic growth 1.Effects of Mass Adoption Driving the mass adoption of PEVs on Georgias roads would: Slow the importation of foreign oil; Lower costs of living and retain billions in the local economy; Better utilize energy produced in Georgia to power transportation; Reduce criteria pollutants helping Atlanta maintain its designation as an attainment area. 2.Investment and Jobs Over the last 3 years the Metro Atlanta Chamber has validated project opportunities to Georgia: 20 total projects directly related to EV Production, supply chain and advanced batteries; $3.9 billion total proposed investment; and 13,070 total proposed new jobs. 6

7 State of Georgia PEV Readiness Efforts 7 The State of Georgia has been identified as one of the leaders in the country for PEV friendly policies and regulatory environment. The State of Georgias PEV readiness initiatives include: A $5,000 tax credit for the purchase of a new Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) A $2,500 tax credit for the purchase and installation of EVSE units (commercial applications only) Access to HOV lanes for Zero Emission Vehicles Source: Roland Berger Strategy Consultants, PEV Readiness Study, Electric Vehicles in America: The question is no longer whether they will come, but how fast and where first, Fall 2010 The State of Georgia has been identified as one of the leaders in the country for PEV friendly policies and regulatory environment. The State of Georgias PEV readiness initiatives include: A $5,000 tax credit for the purchase of a new Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) A $2,500 tax credit for the purchase and installation of EVSE units (commercial applications only) Access to HOV lanes for Zero Emission Vehicles Source: Roland Berger Strategy Consultants, PEV Readiness Study, Electric Vehicles in America: The question is no longer whether they will come, but how fast and where first, Fall 2010 The State of Georgia has been identified as a leader in the U.S. for PEV readiness

8 City of Atlanta Electric Vehicle Readiness Efforts Stage 1 Created a PEV readiness task force consisting of local business leaders, local and state government agencies, and academic institutions to identify and remove barriers to PEV adoption. Stage 2 Updated existing electrical permitting processes to install PEV supply equipment in single family residences, multifamily residences, and commercial areas. Stage 3 Oriented Representative Don Parsons Committee on Energy, Utilities and Telecommunications on the benefits of electric transportation at the Capitol June 13 th Stage 4 Recruited General Electrics Electric Vehicle Experience Tour to Atlanta June 14 th 2011; over 230 people were in attendance including members of the Georgia State Assembly. Stage 5 Marketing the benefits of PEVs to major Atlanta employers so that they will dedicate space for electric vehicle parking and invest in charging equipment for their employees. Stage 6 Conducting a Case Competition to develop strategies that accelerate PEV adoption in the Atlanta region. 8

9 Clean Cites Atlanta Electric Vehicle Readiness Efforts June 14 th 2011: Clean Cities Atlanta submitted a grant proposal for community readiness and planning for plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure $500,000 grant request that will prepare the region for the anticipated $250 million round of DOE funding in FY 12 Includes Alabama, South Carolina, and Middle Georgia Clean Cities Coalitions Charging corridors on I-20, I-75, I-85, I-16, I-65 and I-59 connection Atlanta, Birmingham, Chattanooga, Nashville, Mobile and Savannah June 14 th 2011: Clean Cities Atlanta submitted a grant proposal for community readiness and planning for plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure $500,000 grant request that will prepare the region for the anticipated $250 million round of DOE funding in FY 12 Includes Alabama, South Carolina, and Middle Georgia Clean Cities Coalitions Charging corridors on I-20, I-75, I-85, I-16, I-65 and I-59 connection Atlanta, Birmingham, Chattanooga, Nashville, Mobile and Savannah 9 Mission: To advance the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions to adopt practices that contribute to the reduction of petroleum consumption in the transportation sector. Senate Bill 948; Promoting Electric Vehicles Act of 2011: provides $2 billion in grants over five years for electric vehicle deployment communities. If legislation is approved pilot cities could receive up to $250 million starting in 2012.

10 10 Requests for Action for the Georgia House of Representatives Principal Requests for Action Initiate planning for electric vehicles charging corridors throughout the State of Georgia as part of Representative Parsons efforts to establish a State Energy Plan Figure out a way for extended range electric vehicles, such as the GM Volt, to qualify for Georgias ZEV tax credit Additional State Level PEV Policy and Incentives For Consideration Standardize permitting processes across the State Free parking in state-owned lots/garages for PEVs Grants for local governments to purchase PEVs for fleets Purchasing preferences/commitments for PEVs in state fleets Free charging at state-owned charging stations Reduce/waive vehicle registration fees Moratorium on vehicle miles traveled tax Reduce/waive Ad Valorem tax for PEVs Introduce manufacturing incentive Revenue / Disincentive: Create a revenue-neutral program to incentivize electric vehicles while providing a disincentive to petroleum Introduce a long-term petroleum fuel consumption transition plan

11 11 Appendix: What would the Effect of Electric Vehicles be to the Budget? Revenue Impact of 50,000 PEVs 2009 Budget2010 (estimated)2011 (estimated) Total Revenue$17,832,365,614$17,417,279,403$18,156,435,820 Motor Fuels Fund (MFF)$884,091,188$879,279,044 % of Total Budget Cost of 50,000 PEVs$5,375,000 % of Total MFF lost0.6 PEVs as Percent of Resisted Vehicles Georgia (May 2011)Atlanta MPO (2009) Number of registered Vehicles5.4 million2.8 million 50,000 PEVs as percentage of total ,000 PEVs as percentage of total If 50,000 ICE autos per year with PEVs, it would still require 100+ years to replace the existing ICE fleet!

12 12 Contact Information Contact us: City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability 55 Trinity Ave. SW Suite 2400 Atlanta, Georgia Bill Hosken, Interim Director of Sustainability (404) (o) Jules Toraya, Alternative Transportation Program Manager (404) (o) Stu Lipkin, Alternative Transportation Program Associate (404) (o)


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