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Office Links - Sharing Data in Microsoft Office A Mixed Bag of Treasures Chester N. Barkan Registrar Long Island University, C.W.Post Campus.

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Presentation on theme: "Office Links - Sharing Data in Microsoft Office A Mixed Bag of Treasures Chester N. Barkan Registrar Long Island University, C.W.Post Campus."— Presentation transcript:

1 Office Links - Sharing Data in Microsoft Office A Mixed Bag of Treasures Chester N. Barkan Registrar Long Island University, C.W.Post Campus

2 Microsoft Office Microsoft Word Microsoft Word Mail Merge Feature Mail Merge Feature Hyperlinks Hyperlinks Organizational Charts Organizational Charts Microsoft Access Microsoft Access Merge & Publishing in MS Word – Office Links Merge & Publishing in MS Word – Office Links Analyzing with MS Excel – Office Links Analyzing with MS Excel – Office Links Importing Legacy Data into an Access Database Importing Legacy Data into an Access Database

3 1. OfficeLinks Merge It with MS Word (Tools menu) Starts the Microsoft Word Mail Merge Wizard, which merges Microsoft Access data with a Word document so you can create, for example, form letters or mailing labels. Starts the Microsoft Word Mail Merge Wizard, which merges Microsoft Access data with a Word document so you can create, for example, form letters or mailing labels. Demonstration of mail merge features Demonstration of mail merge features

4 Microsoft Word – Mail Merge Feature Mail Merge Feature – is one example of how we share data between resources Mail Merge Feature – is one example of how we share data between resources Primary File is the document file which is used with the merge data Primary File is the document file which is used with the merge data The data files can be developed using Excel or Access. We will use Access in this presentation The data files can be developed using Excel or Access. We will use Access in this presentation Review the handout on working with the Mail Merge Feature Review the handout on working with the Mail Merge Feature

5 2. Hyperlinks in Word Hyperlinks aren't just blue, underlined words that magically take you to another place. Behind them, in the HTML, is a URL that tells the browser where to go when you click the link. Hyperlinks aren't just blue, underlined words that magically take you to another place. Behind them, in the HTML, is a URL that tells the browser where to go when you click the link. Take a look at the example on the left. "Microsoft Web site" is an example of a hyperlink. Under it is what the HTML looks like for the link. Take a look at the example on the left. "Microsoft Web site" is an example of a hyperlink. Under it is what the HTML looks like for the link. Don't get too caught up in what the HTML means. Just pay attention to the part that's enclosed in quotation marks. That's a URL, and that's where the link takes you when you click it. Don't get too caught up in what the HTML means. Just pay attention to the part that's enclosed in quotation marks. That's a URL, and that's where the link takes you when you click it.

6 Create a hyperlink Microsoft Word creates a hyperlink for you when you type the address of an existing Web page, such as if the automatic formatting of hyperlinks has not been turned off. Microsoft Word creates a hyperlink for you when you type the address of an existing Web page, such as if the automatic formatting of hyperlinks has not been turned off.hyperlink To create more customized hyperlinks, do one of the following, depending on what you want to link to. To create more customized hyperlinks, do one of the following, depending on what you want to link to.

7 3. Organizational Charts On the Drawing toolbar, click Diagram On the Drawing toolbar, click Diagram Toolbar: A bar with buttons and options that you use to carry out commands. To display a toolbar, use the Customize dialog box (point to Toolbars on the View menu and click Customize). To see more buttons, click Toolbar Options at the end of the toolbar. Toolbar: A bar with buttons and options that you use to carry out commands. To display a toolbar, use the Customize dialog box (point to Toolbars on the View menu and click Customize). To see more buttons, click Toolbar Options at the end of the toolbar. Click the Organization Chart diagram, and then click OK. Click the Organization Chart diagram, and then click OK. Do one or more of the following: Do one or more of the following: If you want to add text to a shape, right-click the shape, click Edit Text, and type the text. If you want to add text to a shape, right-click the shape, click Edit Text, and type the text. Text cannot be added to lines or connectors in organization charts. Text cannot be added to lines or connectors in organization charts. If you want to add a shape, select the shape you want to add the new shape under or next to, click the arrow on the Insert Shape button on the Organization Chart toolbar, and then click one or more of the following: If you want to add a shape, select the shape you want to add the new shape under or next to, click the arrow on the Insert Shape button on the Organization Chart toolbar, and then click one or more of the following: Coworker to place the shape next to the selected shape and connect it to the same superior shape. Coworker to place the shape next to the selected shape and connect it to the same superior shape.superior Subordinate to place the new shape below and connect it to the selected shape. Subordinate to place the new shape below and connect it to the selected shape. Assistant to place the new shape below the selected shape with an elbow connector. Assistant to place the new shape below the selected shape with an elbow connector. If you want to add a preset design scheme, click AutoFormat on the Organization Chart toolbar, and select a style from the Organization Chart Style Gallery. If you want to add a preset design scheme, click AutoFormat on the Organization Chart toolbar, and select a style from the Organization Chart Style Gallery. Click outside the drawing when you are finished. Click outside the drawing when you are finished.

8 4. OfficeLinks Publish It with MS Word (Tools menu) Creates a rich-text format (.rtf) file of the selected object (such as a table, report, or portion of a datasheet) and loads it into Microsoft Word. By default, the file name is the name of the object, the file extension is.rtf, and the document is stored in the Microsoft Access folder. Creates a rich-text format (.rtf) file of the selected object (such as a table, report, or portion of a datasheet) and loads it into Microsoft Word. By default, the file name is the name of the object, the file extension is.rtf, and the document is stored in the Microsoft Access folder.

9 MS Access: Export data or database objects To an Access or Excel file To an Access or Excel file Export database objects to an existing Microsoft Access database or Microsoft Access project Export database objects to an existing Microsoft Access database or Microsoft Access project In the Database window click the name of the object you want to export and then on the File menu, click Export. In the Database window click the name of the object you want to export and then on the File menu, click Export.

10 To an Access or Excel file Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder where the database you want to export to is located. Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder where the database you want to export to is located. Double-click the icon for the database that you want to export to. Double-click the icon for the database that you want to export to. In the Export dialog box, enter a name for the new object (or accept the current name). If you are exporting a table, in Export dialog box, select whether you want to export both the table's definition and data or just the table's definition. In the Export dialog box, enter a name for the new object (or accept the current name). If you are exporting a table, in Export dialog box, select whether you want to export both the table's definition and data or just the table's definition.

11 Importing Data to Spreadsheet To a Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet To a Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet Save an object's output as a Microsoft Excel file Save an object's output as a Microsoft Excel fileas a Microsoft Excel fileas a Microsoft Excel file In the Database window, click the name of the object you want to save. To save part of a datasheet, open the datasheet and select a portion of the datasheet before continuing. In the Database window, click the name of the object you want to save. To save part of a datasheet, open the datasheet and select a portion of the datasheet before continuing.Database window Database window On the File menu, click Export. On the File menu, click Export. In the Save as type box, click Microsoft Excel 5-7 (*.xls) or Microsoft Excel (.xls). In the Save as type box, click Microsoft Excel 5-7 (*.xls) or Microsoft Excel (.xls). Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder to save to. Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder to save to. In the File name box, enter a name for the file (or use the suggested name). In the File name box, enter a name for the file (or use the suggested name). Select the Save formatted check box. Select the Save formatted check box.

12 Importing Data to Spreadsheet Do one of the following: Do one of the following: If you are saving a datasheet, click Export All to save the entire datasheet or Save Selection if you selected a portion of the datasheet in step 1. If you are saving a datasheet, click Export All to save the entire datasheet or Save Selection if you selected a portion of the datasheet in step 1. For all other database objects, click Export. For all other database objects, click Export. Load the output of a table, query, form, or report into Microsoft Excel Load the output of a table, query, form, or report into Microsoft Excel Load the output of a table, query, form, or report into Microsoft Excel Load the output of a table, query, form, or report into Microsoft Excel In the Database window,click the name of the datasheet, form, or report you want to save and load into Microsoft Excel. To save a selection of a datasheet, open the datasheet, and then select the portion of the datasheet before continuing. In the Database window,click the name of the datasheet, form, or report you want to save and load into Microsoft Excel. To save a selection of a datasheet, open the datasheet, and then select the portion of the datasheet before continuing.Database window Database window On the Tools menu, point to Office Links, and then click Analyze It with Microsoft Excel. On the Tools menu, point to Office Links, and then click Analyze It with Microsoft Excel.

13 Importing Data to Spreadsheet Export a spreadsheet on a data access page to a Microsoft Excel workbook Export a spreadsheet on a data access page to a Microsoft Excel workbook Export a spreadsheet on a data access page to a Microsoft Excel workbook Export a spreadsheet on a data access page to a Microsoft Excel workbook In the design window, make sure the spreadsheet is activated by double-clicking on the spreadsheet. This will open the application that created the object, which in this case is Microsoft Excel. For additional information on activating a spreadsheet, see Excel Help. In the design window, make sure the spreadsheet is activated by double-clicking on the spreadsheet. This will open the application that created the object, which in this case is Microsoft Excel. For additional information on activating a spreadsheet, see Excel Help. On the toolbar in the spreadsheet, click Export to Microsoft Excel to run or switch to Excel and display the data in a workbook. On the toolbar in the spreadsheet, click Export to Microsoft Excel to run or switch to Excel and display the data in a workbook.

14 To Microsoft Word or other text format Export a datasheet to a delimited or fixed-width text file Export a datasheet to a delimited or fixed-width text file In the Database window click the name of the table, query, view, or stored procedure you want to export, and then on the File menu, click Export. In the Database window click the name of the table, query, view, or stored procedure you want to export, and then on the File menu, click Export. In the Save as type box, click Text Files (*.txt; *.csv; *.tab; *asc). In the Save as type box, click Text Files (*.txt; *.csv; *.tab; *asc). Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder to export to. Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder to export to. In the File Name box, enter a name for the file (or use the suggested name), and then click Export. In the File Name box, enter a name for the file (or use the suggested name), and then click Export. Microsoft Access starts the Export Text Wizard. Microsoft Access starts the Export Text Wizard. Follow the directions in the dialog boxes. Click Advanced to create or use an import/export specification Save an object's output as a Rich Text Format file Follow the directions in the dialog boxes. Click Advanced to create or use an import/export specification Save an object's output as a Rich Text Format file In the Database window,click the name of the object you want to save. To save a selection of a datasheet, open the datasheet and select the portion of the datasheet before continuing. In the Database window,click the name of the object you want to save. To save a selection of a datasheet, open the datasheet and select the portion of the datasheet before continuing.

15 To Microsoft Word or other text format On the File menu, click Export. On the File menu, click Export. In the Save as type box, click Rich Text Format (*.rtf). In the Save as type box, click Rich Text Format (*.rtf). Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder to save to. Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder to save to. In the File name box, enter a name for the file (or use the suggested name). In the File name box, enter a name for the file (or use the suggested name). Do one of the following: Do one of the following: If you are saving a datasheet, click Export All to save the entire datasheet or click the arrow to the right of the Export All box, and select Save Selection if you selected a portion of the datasheet in step 1. If you are saving a datasheet, click Export All to save the entire datasheet or click the arrow to the right of the Export All box, and select Save Selection if you selected a portion of the datasheet in step 1. For all other database objects, click Export. For all other database objects, click Export. Load the output of a table, query, form, or report into Microsoft Word Load the output of a table, query, form, or report into Microsoft Word In the Database window,click the name of the datasheet, form, or report you want to save and load into Microsoft Word. To save a selection of a datasheet, open the datasheet and select the portion of the datasheet before continuing. In the Database window,click the name of the datasheet, form, or report you want to save and load into Microsoft Word. To save a selection of a datasheet, open the datasheet and select the portion of the datasheet before continuing.

16 To Microsoft Word or other text format On the Tools menu, point to Office Links, and click Publish It with Microsoft Word. On the Tools menu, point to Office Links, and click Publish It with Microsoft Word. Save a datasheet to an encoded format Save a datasheet to an encoded format On the File menu, click Export. On the File menu, click Export. In the Save as type box, click Text Files (*.txt; *.csv; *.tab; *asc). In the Save as type box, click Text Files (*.txt; *.csv; *.tab; *asc). Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder to export to. Click the arrow to the right of the Save in box, and select the drive or folder to export to. In the File name box, enter a name for the file (or use the suggested name). In the File name box, enter a name for the file (or use the suggested name). Select the Save formatted check box. Select the Save formatted check box. In the Encode As dialog box, select the method of encoding as Windows (default), MS-DOS, Unicode, or Unicode (UTF-8). In the Encode As dialog box, select the method of encoding as Windows (default), MS-DOS, Unicode, or Unicode (UTF-8).

17 Export to HTML format To a Web page To a Web page Depending on whether you need static or dynamic data, you can export, import, or link to different types of HTML data in Microsoft Access. Depending on whether you need static or dynamic data, you can export, import, or link to different types of HTML data in Microsoft Access. Export Export Export a datasheet to dynamic HTML format Export a datasheet to dynamic HTML format In the Database window click the name of the table, query, or form you want to export, and then on the File menu, click Export. In the Database window click the name of the table, query, or form you want to export, and then on the File menu, click Export. In the Save As Type box, click Microsoft IIS 1-2 (*.htx; *.idc) or Microsoft Active Server Pages (*.asp). In the Save As Type box, click Microsoft IIS 1-2 (*.htx; *.idc) or Microsoft Active Server Pages (*.asp). Click the arrow to the right of the Save In box and select the drive or folder to export to. Click the arrow to the right of the Save In box and select the drive or folder to export to. In the File Name box, enter the file name. In the File Name box, enter the file name. Click Export. Click Export.

18 Export to HTML format In the HTML Template box, enter the location of an HTML template. In the HTML Template box, enter the location of an HTML template. In the Data Source Name box, enter the name of the ODBC data source that you will connect to when the server- generated HTML files are processed on the Web server. In the Data Source Name box, enter the name of the ODBC data source that you will connect to when the server- generated HTML files are processed on the Web server. Do one of the following: Do one of the following:

19 Export to HTML format Export a datasheet to static HTML format Export a datasheet to static HTML format In the Database window click the name of the table, query, or form, you want to export, and then on the File menu, click Export. In the Database window click the name of the table, query, or form, you want to export, and then on the File menu, click Export. In the Save As Type box, click HTML Documents (*.html;*.htm). In the Save As Type box, click HTML Documents (*.html;*.htm). Click the arrow to the right of the Save In box and select the drive or folder to export to. Click the arrow to the right of the Save In box and select the drive or folder to export to. In the File Name box, enter the file name. In the File Name box, enter the file name. Select the Save Formatted check box to: Select the Save Formatted check box to: Save the table, query, or form in a format similar to its appearance in Datasheet view Save the table, query, or form in a format similar to its appearance in Datasheet view Datasheet view Datasheet view Enable the AutoStart check box Enable the AutoStart check box

20 Import or link Import or link (read-only) HTML tables and lists Import or link (read-only) HTML tables and lists Open a database, or switch to the Database window for the open database. Open a database, or switch to the Database window for the open database. To import HTML tables or lists, on the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import. To import HTML tables or lists, on the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import. To link HTML tables or lists, on the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Link Tables. To link HTML tables or lists, on the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Link Tables. In the Import or Link dialog box, in the Files of type box, click HTML Documents (*.html; *.htm). In the Import or Link dialog box, in the Files of type box, click HTML Documents (*.html; *.htm). Click the arrow to the right of the Look in box. Click the arrow to the right of the Look in box. Select the drive and folder where the HTML file you want to import or link is located, and then double-click the file name. Select the drive and folder where the HTML file you want to import or link is located, and then double-click the file name. Follow the instructions for the Import HTML Wizard or the Link HTML Wizard. Click the Advanced button if you want to edit an import/export specification (import/export specification: A specification that stores the information Access needs to import or export a fixed-width or delimited text file.) or specify different file and field formats. Follow the instructions for the Import HTML Wizard or the Link HTML Wizard. Click the Advanced button if you want to edit an import/export specification (import/export specification: A specification that stores the information Access needs to import or export a fixed-width or delimited text file.) or specify different file and field formats..)

21 OfficeLinks Analyze It with MS Excel (Tools menu) Creates a Microsoft Excel (.xls) file of the selected object (such as a table, report, or portion of a datasheet) and loads it into Microsoft Excel. By default, the file name is the name of the object, the file extension is.xls, and the document is stored in the Microsoft Access folder.

22 Importing Legacy Data into an Access Database Requirements are an open Access database and the text file- 2 Options Requirements are an open Access database and the text file- 2 Options Get External Data Import (File menu) Get External Data Import (File menu) Copies data from a text file, HTML file, spreadsheet, Microsoft Exchange folder or address book, database object, or database table into a Microsoft Access table. Also, copies objects from another database into the current database. Copies data from a text file, HTML file, spreadsheet, Microsoft Exchange folder or address book, database object, or database table into a Microsoft Access table. Also, copies objects from another database into the current database.

23 Get External Data Link Tables (File menu) Links data from a table in another database to a Microsoft Access table in the current database. Links data from a table in another database to a Microsoft Access table in the current database.

24 Legacy or Mainframe Data Referring to ASCII text (delimited or fixed width) data that is generated by most legacy mainframe systems Referring to ASCII text (delimited or fixed width) data that is generated by most legacy mainframe systems Import data wizard Import data wizard

25 Reasons to import data into a table If you know that you will use your data only in Microsoft Access, you should import it. Microsoft Access generally works faster with its own tables, and, if you need to, you can modify the imported table to meet your needs just like any other table that is created in Microsoft Access. If you know that you will use your data only in Microsoft Access, you should import it. Microsoft Access generally works faster with its own tables, and, if you need to, you can modify the imported table to meet your needs just like any other table that is created in Microsoft Access.

26 Reasons to link data from an external table You might want to link to tables from other Microsoft Access databases if, for example, you want to use a table from another Microsoft Access database that is shared on a network. This is particularly useful if you want to store all of your tables in one database on a network server, while keeping forms, reports, and other objects in a separate database that is copied among users of the shared database. You can easily split an existing database into two databases, called front-end and a back-end databases. You might want to link to tables from other Microsoft Access databases if, for example, you want to use a table from another Microsoft Access database that is shared on a network. This is particularly useful if you want to store all of your tables in one database on a network server, while keeping forms, reports, and other objects in a separate database that is copied among users of the shared database. You can easily split an existing database into two databases, called front-end and a back-end databases.

27 Demonstration of Importing Data from Text files Import Wizard Import Wizard Review the different stops. Review the different stops. Setting the field sizes – be familiar with the data you are working with. If something is 3 characters in length, you should allow fore that when creating the table Setting the field sizes – be familiar with the data you are working with. If something is 3 characters in length, you should allow fore that when creating the table Data Types – Be Alert – What constitutes text data vs. numeric that will be used in calculations Data Types – Be Alert – What constitutes text data vs. numeric that will be used in calculations

28 Demonstration & Conclusion Complete the identification of the fields Complete the identification of the fields Importing into an existing table or creating a new table Importing into an existing table or creating a new table Review data once it is imported Review data once it is imported Any questions can be referred to me c/o Any questions can be referred to me c/o


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