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1 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. 11 A UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA EXTENSION LEECH LAKE BAND OF OJIBWE PARTNERSHIP SHIRLEY.

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Presentation on theme: "1 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. 11 A UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA EXTENSION LEECH LAKE BAND OF OJIBWE PARTNERSHIP SHIRLEY."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. 11 A UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA EXTENSION LEECH LAKE BAND OF OJIBWE PARTNERSHIP SHIRLEY NORDRUM, EXTENSION EDUCATOR Helping Solve Wastewater Problems In Indian Country

2 2 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HOW THIS PARTNERSHIP CAME ABOUT U of M Extension worked with the Leech Lake Band to seek funding from USDA National Institute of Food and Agricultures Federally-Recognized Tribal Extension Program to place an Extension Educator on Leech Lake Reservation.

3 3 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RISKS TO MANOOMIN Altered hydrology Water quality Invasive species Genetic engineering Shoreland development Climate Change

4 4 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. WHY A WASTEWATER FOCUS? The Leech Lake Reservation has extensive water resources and indigenous food supplies. More than half of the Reservation is covered by surface water and wetlands including 13,000 acres of natural wild rice beds. Failing septic systems pose an eminent threat to the Reservations water resources, indigenous food supplies and public health. The Band estimates there are 1,200 failing septic systems on the Reservation resulting in 97 million gallons of untreated wastewater released, annually into the environment.

5 5 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. TYPICAL WATER USE EPA estimates Individual Use per year = 27,000 gal Home ~ 3 persons = 81,000 gal/yr

6 6 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. IMPACTS FROM UNTREATED WASTEWATER Inadequate treatment of sewage allows bacteria, viruses, and other disease causing pathogens and nutrients to enter ground and surface water. Creating both human health and environmental risks.

7 7 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.

8 8 WHY SO MANY FAILING SYSTEMS? Undersized systems, standard protocol for system design is to base the daily flow on two people per bedroom. This practice does not take into consideration the culture of extended families and lack of housing available on Reservations. Lack of Educational Opportunities for both home owner and wastewater professionals.

9 9 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. OUR APPROACH Community Education and Outreach Building Professional Capacity Development of a Tribal Small Community Wastewater Process

10 10 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND OUTREACH One on one homeowner education is offered during Leech Lake Septic assessments. A billboard posted on the Leech Lake uses humor and storytelling to help raise community awareness.

11 11 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. Stewardship Guide for Leech Lake Lands is a culturally appropriate tool to communicate information about sustainable land and water use practices.

12 12 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. DRMS Leech Lake Summer youth and Tribal College Interns shadow University of Minnesota Extension and Leech Lake staff to experience hands on learning of best management practices for natural resources.

13 13 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. BUILDING PROFESSIONAL CAPACITY Sewer Camp: Customized training for professionals for on-site sewage treatment systems 20 wastewater professionals Indian Health Service Leech Lake Red Lake

14 14 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. Tribal Wastewater Roundtable: Bringing together organizations that work in Indian Country to discuss wastewater management strategies Building Professional Capacity Fond du Lac Band Red Lake Nation Leech Lake Band Indian Health Service Mille Lacs Band White Earth Band

15 15 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. DEVELOPMENT OF A TRIBAL SMALL COMMUNITY PROCESS.

16 16 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. WHAT IS A SITE ASSESSMENT? Inspect septic system for compliance Well Water tests for Bacteria, Nitrate, Arsenic Installed water meters Check/pump septic tank Conduct soil boring/Match soils Locate potential soil treatment area(s) Identify treatment options that meet the needs of the community

17 17 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. THE COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT REPORT Formulate soil-based treatment options for the entire community – Holding tanks, – Individual systems – Cluster system Integrate preliminary and field evaluations results for each parcel in the community

18 18 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The goals of these projects is to integrate federal and tribal agencies, University of Minnesota Extension educators, and community members to co-create a tribal, small community process to address wastewater management issues unique to tribal lands with culturally driven solutions.

19 19 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, this PowerPoint is available in alternative formats upon request. Direct requests to the Extension Store at Miigwech


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