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Learning in Na Communities Tami Blumenfield University of Washington Dept. of Anthropology Lugu Lake, China Presented to Anthropology.

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Presentation on theme: "Learning in Na Communities Tami Blumenfield University of Washington Dept. of Anthropology Lugu Lake, China Presented to Anthropology."— Presentation transcript:

1 Learning in Na Communities Tami Blumenfield University of Washington Dept. of Anthropology Lugu Lake, China Presented to Anthropology 470: Minority Peoples of China March 3, 2009

2 Background: Who are the Na? 30,000 people living in Himalayan Foothills (northwest Yunnan, southwest Sichuan) Sexual visit system and extended family households Schooling since 1960s; compulsory schooling beginning in late 1990s Tourism since 1990s

3 Minority Region, but not just Na Yi, Han, and Pumi are other significant populations in the region In Yongning Township: Na (37.6%) Han (25.5%) Yi (19.3%) Pumi (9.9%) Background: Ethnic Diversity

4 Four Forms of Learning Traditional village-based learning Religious education School education Tourism and migration

5 Traditional Learning Traditional learning: –Family-based –Peer-based –Apprentice-based Knowledge transmitted: –Morals and manners –Skills –Ecological knowledge –Medicinal knowledge

6 Religious Education Daba shamans Gelugpa sect of Tibetan Buddhism and another sect Zhameisi Monastery in Yongning Temples in Zebo, Luoshui, and Latadi

7 Religious Education Funerals, ceremonies, and daily rites

8 School Education State-run Chinese-language schools Compulsory schooling through junior middle school (chuzhong)

9 Quality Accessibility Affordability School Education

10 Tourism and Migration Local and regional tourism since 1990s changing the landscape and economy Interactions between tourists and Na as a form of learning Development of museums and exhibits to educate tourists about Na culture

11 Interactions between tourists and Na as a form of learning Lige Village

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13 Strong emphasis on education by visitors Luoshui Village

14 Tourism and Migration: Creating a Tiered System

15 Yongning Lugu Lake Luoshui Satellite Image Source: Google Earth Lige Wenquan Tuozhi Yanyuan County -->

16 At the Scenic Overlook Platform with Young Vendors

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18 Educational Aid Educational NGOs, informal donations and volunteers From the Moso Education Fund to Edu-aid in YongNing (www.luguhu.org) Complications of ethnicity and education

19 Husi Chawu: Cafe and Guesthouse Luoshui Village

20 Site of an Education Fund (Since 2001) Luoshui Village

21 Bringing School Supplies to a Nuosu Village School (2002)

22 A Nuosu Village School

23 Volunteer Teachers

24 We also had the privelige of teaching English at a Muosu elementary school. The school had been destroyed the previous year by an earthquake and the children were still having to attend classes in tents. We were happy to give our time and even provided each child a pencil, a small token by our standards but not an insignificant gift in a region as poor and remote as this one. Posted from Kunming, 10/22/02 9:42:53 AM (accessed January 22, 2004) Where There Be Dragons Bulletin Board Posts

25 Employment Migration as a Form of Learning

26 No matter how poor, dont impoverish the children… No matter how bitter, dont make it bitter for the children!

27 Can the Four Forms of Learning be Complementary? Traditional village-based learning Religious education School education Tourism and migration

28 Thank you! Questions or comments?


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