Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Welcome to the Presentation on the Model IEP Form

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Welcome to the Presentation on the Model IEP Form"— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to the Presentation on the Model IEP Form
This presentation is presented using PowerPoint with an audio component. To access the audio component, use the audio symbol on the bottom right of each slide. Slide 1: Welcome to the Presentation on the Model IEP Form This PowerPoint has an audio component, which can be accessed by using the audio symbol on the bottom right of each slide.

2 New York State Education Department (NYSED) Individualized Education Program (IEP) Module #3
12-Month Recommendation Testing Accommodations Coordinated Set of Transition Activities Participation in Assessments Participation with Students without Disabilities Special Transportation Placement Recommendation Slide 2: Introduction Welcome to this prerecorded presentation about the State’s model individualized education program (IEP). This presentation is one of three presentations about the IEP. Module 1 addressed the introduction to the State’s model IEP form and the initial components of the IEP. Module 2 addressed measurable post-secondary and annual goals and short-term instructional objectives and/or benchmarks, reporting progress to parents and special education program and service recommendations. Module 3 will address additional recommendations that are included in the IEP. It is suggested that the three modules be viewed in order.

3 Examples and Guidance The examples and information provided in this training do not impose any requirements beyond those required under applicable law and regulation. Slide 3: Examples and Guidance The examples and information provided in this training do not impose any requirements beyond those required under applicable law and regulation.

4 NYSED Release of Model IEP
January 2010 release memo and associated materials available at: Release memo Model forms Optional Student Information Summary form Individualized Education Program (IEP) form General Directions to use the State’s model IEP form IEP Questions and Answers Guide to Quality Individualized Education Program (IEP) Development and Implementation Slide 4: NYSED Release of Model IEP The model forms and related material were released in January The link on this slide will bring you to: An introductory policy memorandum; Attachment 1 - the optional Student Information Summary Form; Attachment 2 - the model IEP form; Attachment 3 - General Directions to Use the State’s Model IEP Form. This includes directions on how to use the document itself as well as general guidance and examples for specific portions of the IEP; Questions and answers related to the IEP form and IEP development; and NYSED’s Guide to Quality IEP Development and Implementation which will assist Committees in developing IEPs that are reasonably calculated to enable students to receive educational benefit. To assist you in understanding this presentation, it would be helpful if you print these materials, particularly the IEP form and Attachment 3 (General Directions) and have them in front of you as you view this presentation.

5 IEP Training Modules Module #1: Module #2: Introduction to the IEP
Optional Student Information Summary form Present Levels of Performance and Individual Needs (insert link to Module 1 here) Module #2: Measurable Post-secondary Goals Measurable Annual Goals and Short -Term Instructional Objectives and Benchmarks Reporting to Parents Special Education Programs and Services (insert link to Module 2 here) Slide 5: IEP Training Modules Thus far, Modules 1 & 2 have provided an introduction to the IEP, which included a review of the regulatory requirements for IEPs. Module 1 addressed the components of Present Levels of Performance. Module 2 addressed the sections of the IEP form relating to measurable post- secondary goals; measurable annual goals, and short-term instructional objectives and/or benchmarks; reporting to parents and special education program and service recommendations. Links to Module 1 and 2 of this presentation series are found on this slide. Module 3 will address the sections of the IEP form relating to 12-month special education programs and services; testing accommodations; transition activities; participation in assessments; participation in other activities with nondisabled peers, special transportation; and placement.

6 12-Month Service and/or Program
Same as 10-month recommendation or different If different, identify service and/or program Service delivery recommendations, frequency, duration, location, initiation/service dates Name of school/agency provider of service during July/August For a preschool student, reason student needs July/August services Slide 6: 12-Month Service and/or Program The Committee must provide a recommendation in the IEP as to whether the student needs special education programs and services during July and August in order to receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE). The State’s model IEP form provides a template for 12-month recommendations. Recommendation(s) for special education services and/or programs during July and August may differ from the recommendations made for the school year program. For this reason and because there is no requirement that the IEP include information under one component of a student’s IEP that is already contained under another component of the student’s IEP, the form provides a space for the IEP recommendations that are specific to the 12-month services. If this information has already been documented in other sections of the student’s IEP, this section could reference the component of the IEP where this information has been documented. The identity of the provider of services during the months of July and August must be indicated in the IEP. Other than for 12-month service and/or program, there is no regulatory requirement that an IEP include the name of the provider of service. In addition, placement for 12-month service and/or program may be provided in a setting or location that differs from the one the student attends during the school year. For this reason, the provider and placement recommendations for 12-month services must be clearly indicated. If a preschool child is recommended for 12-month special education programs and/or services, the IEP must include the reasons for this recommendation. There is a link to a Question and Answer document about extended school year services provided in July and August at the end of this presentation.

7 Example: 12-Month Service and/or Program
Slide 7: Example: 12-Month Service and/or Program This is an example of how a recommendation for 12-month special education service and/or program for a school-age student could be documented in an IEP.

8 Testing Accommodations
None; or Identify Accommodation(s) Type Conditions e.g., test characteristics- type, length, purpose Implementation Recommendations e.g., amount of extended time, type of setting specific to the testing accommodation Slide 8: Testing Accommodations As part of the IEP, the Committee must indicate the individual testing accommodations needed by the student, if any, to be used consistently: in his or her recommended education program, in the administration of district-wide assessments of student achievement, and consistent with Department policy, in State assessments of student achievement that are needed by the student to participate in the assessment. This section would only be completed for preschool students if there is an assessment program for nondisabled preschool students. The purpose of testing accommodations is to enable students with disabilities to participate in assessment programs on an equal basis with their nondisabled peers. Testing accommodations provide an opportunity for students with disabilities to demonstrate mastery of skills and attainment of knowledge without being limited or unfairly restricted due to the effects of a disability. Testing accommodations should not be excessive, and should alter the standard administration of the test to the least extent possible. The State’s IEP form provides testing accommodation drop-down options. However, since this list is not finite, text boxes allow the district to enter additional testing accommodation recommendations as appropriate. For each recommended testing accommodation, the Committee must, as applicable, identify: the conditions or types of tests that will require testing accommodations (such as type, length, purpose of test), as well as any implementation recommendations (such as amount of extended time, duration and interval of breaks). For additional information on testing accommodations, links to the Department’s Office of Assessment Policy, Development and Administration (APDA) and the guidance document entitled Test Access and Accommodations for Students with Disabilities —Policy and Tools to Guide Decision-Making and Implementation are provided at the end of this presentation.

9 Example: Testing Accommodations
Slide 9: Example: Testing Accommodations This is an example of how recommendations for testing accommodations could be documented in an IEP.

10 Coordinated Set of Transition Activities Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the student is age 15 (and at a younger age if appropriate) Needed activities to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities Instruction Related Services Community Experiences Development of Employment and Other Post-school Adult Living Objectives Acquisition of Daily Living Skills (if applicable) Functional Vocational Assessment (if applicable) Service/Activity School District/Agency Responsible Slide 10: Coordinated Set of Transition Activities At this point in the development of an IEP, the Committee must again consider the student’s transition from school to post-school living. Transition services focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability in order to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities. Beginning with the first IEP to be in effect when the student is age 15 (and at a younger age, if determined appropriate) and updated annually, the IEP must include a statement of needed transition services. For effective transition planning, the CSE first identifies the student’s measurable post-secondary goals and transition needs. It then recommends annual goals that prepare the student to meet those post-secondary goals. The CSE also considers the student’s transition needs in its recommendations for special education programs and/or services. In this next section of the IEP, the coordinated set of transition activities is documented in the areas of: Instruction, Related services, Community experiences, and Development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives. and, and if appropriate, address: Acquisition of daily living skills, and The need for a functional vocational assessment. This section of the IEP must also include a statement of the responsibilities of the school district and/or the participating agency(s), if applicable, for the provision of those transition activities. Districts may remove this section of the IEP for younger students (e.g., elementary-age students). However, this section must appear in IEPs for middle and secondary-age students; although the Coordinated Set of Transition Activities only needs to be completed beginning with the first IEP to be in effect when the student turns age 15 (or younger if deemed appropriate).

11 Example: Coordinated Set of Transition Activities
Slide 11: Example: Coordinated Set of Transition Activities This is an example of how the coordinated set of transition activities for a student with a disability could be documented in an IEP.

12 Participation in State and District-wide Assessments
Same State and district-wide assessments, or Alternate assessment on a particular State or district-wide assessment If so: Why the student cannot participate in the regular assessment; and Why the particular alternate assessment selected is appropriate for the student. Slide 12: Participation in State & District-Wide Assessments All students with disabilities must be included in State or district-wide assessment programs. If the Committee determines that the student will participate in an alternate assessment on a particular State or district-wide assessment of student achievement, the IEP must provide a statement of why the student cannot participate in the regular assessment, and why the particular alternate assessment selected is appropriate for the student. At the high school level, a determination that the student cannot take the regular State assessment and will participate in an alternate assessment (New York State Alternate Assessment) will mean that the student cannot graduate with a regular high school diploma. Therefore, this determination is an important one and should be reconsidered at each annual meeting to review the student’s IEP. This section of the IEP would be completed for preschool students only if there is an assessment program for nondisabled preschool students.

13 Example: Participation in State and District-wide Assessments
Slide 13: Example: Participation in State and District-Wide Assessments This is an example of how a student’s participation in State and district-wide assessments could be documented in an IEP.

14 Participation with Students Without Disabilities
Explain the extent, if any, that the student will not participate in: Regular class, extracurricular and/or other nonacademic activities (school age) Appropriate activities with age-appropriate nondisabled peers (preschool) If the student will not participate in regular physical education, extent of specially-designed physical education instruction (including adapted physical education) Exemption from language other than English Slide 14: Participation with Students Without Disabilities Removal from the general education environment occurs only when the nature or severity of the disability is such that, even with the use of supplementary aids and services, education cannot be satisfactorily achieved. The IEP must provide an explanation of the extent, if any, to which the student will not participate with nondisabled students in the general education class and extracurricular and nonacademic activities, or, for preschool students, in appropriate activities with age-appropriate nondisabled peers. This may be indicated as the percent of the school day or by identifying particular activities that the student will not participate in with his or her nondisabled peers. The IEP could, but is not required to, include a narrative explanation of the student-specific factors for recommendations to remove the student from the regular class (or for preschool students, appropriate activities with age-appropriate peers without disabilities). For school-age students, this section also addresses: the extent to which the student will participate in specially-designed instruction in physical education, including adapted physical education; and whether or not a student will be exempt from the language other than English requirement because the student's disability affects his or her ability to learn a language. It is important that the CSE, parent(s) and student carefully consider the implications that such an exemption may have on a student’s achieving his or her post-secondary goals when planning courses of study. For students seeking to go on to college, courses in a language other than English are often required for admission.

15 Example: Participation with Students without Disabilities
Slide 15: Example: Participation with Students Without Disabilities This is an example of how a student’s participation with students without disabilities could be documented in an IEP.

16 Special Transportation
None Needs special transportation as follows: Special seating Vehicle and/or equipment needs Adult supervision Type of transportation Other accommodations To and from special class or other program at another site Slide 16: Special Transportation While most students with disabilities receive the same transportation services as nondisabled students, it is the responsibility of the Committee to determine whether a student’s disability prevents him or her from getting to school in the same manner, or from using the same transportation, as nondisabled students.  Committees need to consider and make recommendations regarding any specialized transportation equipment (such as special or adapted buses, lifts, ramps, etc), needed by the student to travel: to and from school (including such school-related programs as work programs and settings other than the school where the student receives education or special education services); and as appropriate, in and around the school. The IEP must include specific transportation recommendations to address each of the student’s disability-related special transportation needs, as appropriate. It is not appropriate for the IEP to simply indicate, “special transportation needed,” without including the nature of the special transportation. The IEP provides drop-down options for documenting a student’s special transportation needs. After selecting the category of the special transportation needs, the IEP must document the specific nature of the recommendation. For example: Special seating - such as seating away from the window; Vehicle and/or equipment needs - such as a lap belt or safety vest; Adult supervision - such as specialized training for the bus driver or a one-on-one bus attendant for a designated purpose; Type of transportation - such as a small bus with few students; and Other accommodations - such as permission to use a personal electronic device. In addition, the IEP must indicate if the student needs transportation to and from special education services to be provided at another site.

17 Example: Special Transportation
Slide 17: Examples: Special Transportation This slide shows examples of how a student’s special transportation recommendations could be documented in an IEP.

18 Placement Where the student’s IEP will be implemented
Slide 18: Placement All the sections of the IEP completed by the Committee up to this point form the basis for the Committee’s placement recommendation. Placement recommendations must be made on an individual basis in consideration of the student’s unique needs. The identification of placement must specify where the student's IEP will be implemented and should indicate the type of setting where the student will receive special education services. For example: Public school district BOCES class Approved private school day program. Placement recommendations must be developed in consideration of least restrictive environment (LRE): the extent special education services are provided to a student in a setting with the student’s non-disabled peers and as close to the student’s home as possible.

19 Example: Placement Recommendation
School Age Preschool Slide 19: Example: Placement This slide shows two examples of how a student’s placement recommendations could be documented in an IEP. One for a school-age student and one for a preschool student.

20 Additional Guidance NYSED Office of Assessment Policy, Development and Administration Test Access and Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: Policy and Tools to Guide Decision-making and Implementation Policy memorandum — Special transportation Policy memorandum — IEP Diploma Extended school year questions and answers Slides 20: Additional Guidance Links to additional guidance on many of the topics addressed in this presentation are available on this slide. NYSED Office of Assessment Policy, Development and Administration Test Access and Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: Policy and Tools to Guide Decision-making and Implementation Policy memorandum — Special transportation Policy memorandum — IEP Diploma Extended school year questions and answers

21 Questions regarding the State’s model forms may be sent to:
Responses to questions will be periodically posted at: Slide 21: Questions regarding the State’s model forms may be sent to Questions regarding the State’s model IEP form may be sent to the address indicated on this slide.   NYSED will respond to questions received, as appropriate, by periodically posting Questions and Answers on our website.

22 For Additional Technical Assistance
NYSED Special Education Quality Assurance Offices NYSED Special Education Policy Office Regional Special Education Technical Assistance Support Centers Slide 22: For Additional Technical Assistance This completes the third and final module on use of the State’s IEP form. The three presentations have shown how the IEP identifies the free appropriate public education (FAPE) that is offered to a student with a disability eligible to receive individualized programming and/or related services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. For additional technical assistance, contact: a Special Education Quality Assurance Regional Office (http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/quality/regassoc.htm); the Special Education Policy Office ( ); or a specialist from the Regional Special Education Technical Assistance Support Centers (http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/techassist/rsetasc/locations.htm).


Download ppt "Welcome to the Presentation on the Model IEP Form"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google