Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 Migrant Education Comprehensive Needs Assessment Overview Preliminary Report Jorge Gaj, California Department of Education Margit Birge, California Comprehensive.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 Migrant Education Comprehensive Needs Assessment Overview Preliminary Report Jorge Gaj, California Department of Education Margit Birge, California Comprehensive."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Migrant Education Comprehensive Needs Assessment Overview Preliminary Report Jorge Gaj, California Department of Education Margit Birge, California Comprehensive Center at WestEd Armando Tafoya, California Comprehensive Center at WestEd

2 2 What Is the Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)? The Comprehensive Needs Assessment process is a national effort : – to determine the needs of migrant students, – to target those areas most likely to impact the educational success of migrant students, –to offer evidence of success for the Migrant Education Program, –to be ongoing.

3 3 CNA Cooperative effort: USDE – Office of Migrant Education Five Federal Comprehensive Centers Based on pilot conducted in four states: –Arizona –Texas –Michigan –Pennsylvania

4 4 Benefits of Conducting a Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) The process: encourages a thorough review of the entire statewide Migrant Education Program, engages Migrant Education Program staff, parents and community members, develops critical areas of focus for the Migrant Education Program.

5 5 Levels of Needs Level I: Service receiver needs (Migrant students & their families) Level II: Service provider & policy maker needs (School staff & migrant liaisons, administrators, community services staff) Level III: System needs (resources/ procedures/retrieval systems /transportation/supplies/delivery systems)

6 6 Goal Areas from NCLB School Readiness Proficiency in Math Proficiency in Reading High School Graduation

7 7 Common Areas of Concern Educational Continuity Instructional Time School Engagement English Language Development Educational Support in the Home Health Access to Services

8 8 Three Phase Process Phase I: Explore what is Phase II: Gather and analyze data Phase III: Make decisions

9 9 Phase I Started with 40 concern statements –School Readiness –Reading –Mathematics –High School –Out of School Youth (OSY) Determined which concern statements could be investigated with data –Within constraints in time –Within constraints in resources

10 10 Phase II Data Sources –Parents –Students –California Department of Education –Migrant Education Program –Schools and School Districts

11 11 Areas of Statewide Findings Age of Kindergarten Enrollment English Language Acquisition Skills Upon entering High School Academic Progress in High School High School Graduation

12 12 Age of Kindergarten Enrollment Concern : Migrant students are not enrolled in kindergarten and do not advance to first grade in a timely manner.

13 13 Age of Kindergarten Enrollment Data submitted by the Migrant Regional Offices (FY 2004-2005) Guidelines dictate that students entering kindergarten should be 5 years of age by December 2nd.

14 14 Age of Kindergarten Enrollment Age Number of Students Percent of Students 4.5 to 4.93,99814.8 5.0 to 5.916,28861.0 6.0 to 6.96,20523.2 7.0 to 7.3208< 0.1 Total26,699100.0 Findings : Only 61% of migrant students enter kindergarten at the regulated age. Nearly 24% are overage upon entering kindergarten.

15 15 English Language Acquisition Concern : English learner migrant students are not acquiring English at the expected rate of development.

16 16 English Language Acquisition Data provided by the California Department of Education for 2005 Students whose native language is not English are assessed annually to determine English proficiency using the California English Language Development Test (CELDT)

17 17 English Language Acquisition LevelMigrant StudentsNon-Migrant Students Beginner2.73.1 Early Intermediate3.4 Intermediate4.34.2 Early Advanced5.85.6 Advanced6.86.3 Findings : Despite a quicker start than non-migrants, migrant students take longer to achieve proficiency in English as measured by years in school for each level.

18 18 Academic Progress in High School - Part 1 Language Arts Concern : Migrant high school students are not completing courses that meet A-G requirements.

19 19 Academic Progress in High School - Part 1 Language Arts The CNA Management team selected a representative sample of migrant students enrolled in the 11th grade in 2005-2006 Regional Data Liaisons from 23 MEP regions collected information on course completions 404 completed forms were returned to WestEd. Logic : UC requires 4 year of English course work. At the mid-point in High School (start of 11th grade) students should have completed half of the requisite English courses to graduate eligible for UC admission.

20 20 Academic Progress in High School - Part 1 Language Arts Findings: At start of the 11th grade, only 50% of migrant students are on track to graduate UC eligible.

21 21 Academic Progress in High School- Part 2 Mathematics Concern : Migrant students scoring proficient or above on the Math CST are not completing A-G math requirements successfully.

22 22 Academic Progress in High School- Part 2 Mathematics The CNA Management team selected a representative sample of migrant students who scored proficient or above on the 9th grade Algebra I test in spring of 2005 Logic : High achieving migrants students who pass Algebra 1 should be placed in math courses that follow in sequence.

23 23 Academic Progress in High School- Part 2 Mathematics Finding : Of the sample of 260 migrant students who scored proficient or above on the Algebra I CST, 96.5% were placed in a progressive math course the following year.

24 24 Academic Progress in High School- Part 2 Mathematics Further investigation showed that despite the states goal for students to complete Algebra 1 in the 8th grade, it is not the case for many migrant students. Moreover, many migrant students are taking coursework that is at least one grade level lower.

25 25 Academic Progress in High School- Part 2 Mathematics

26 26 Academic Progress in High School- Part 2 Mathematics

27 27 Academic Progress in High School- Part 3 CAHSEE Passing Rates Concern: Migrant students are not completing requirements that lead to high school graduation.

28 28 Academic Progress in High School- Part 3 CAHSEE Passing Rates Data obtained from the California Department of Education CAHSEE is administered to all 10th, 11th and 12th grade students CAHSEE is composed of a mathematics and a language arts sections In the 11th and 12th grades, students have multiple opportunities to take and pass one or both sections of the CAHSEE

29 29 Academic Progress in High School- Part 3 CAHSEE Passing Rates

30 30 Academic Progress in High School- Part 3 CAHSEE Passing Rates

31 31 Additional Areas of Investigation Engagement to School Community Health Needs Math Supplemental Services Educational Support in the Home Out of School Youth (OSY)

32 32 California Health Kids Survey California Health Kids Survey (CHKS) asks students about: –Affinity to school –Diagnosed with asthma –Medical check-up in the last 12 months –Weight control –Dental visits –Feeling sad and hopeless –Suicidal feelings and attempts Some comparison data available from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (CDC)

33 33 Migrant-Like Construct Used to approximate migrant student responses Construct is: Focused on large migrant student population high schools Students who self-reported Latino/Hispanic, and Self-report moving more than 2 times in the last 12 months

34 34 Migrant-Like Construct Deficiencies: Lacks validation for actual migrant status –No way to determine if student is actually a migrant student Lacks reasons for reported moves –Context for moves could be other than seasonal work related

35 35 Health needs of Migrant-Like Students Using the migrant-like construct produces results that mirror state and national averages. Of concern, suicide attempts by migrant- like students are more severe compared to state and national averages.

36 36 Health needs of Migrant Students Data Collection: Parent Questionnaires 1) More than 1,900 questionnaires were administered by MEES staff during home visits in 19 MEP regions. 2) Over 430 questionnaires were completed by parents of K-12 students at meetings and trainings in 5 MEP regions.

37 37 Health needs of Migrant Students Approximately 10% of the K-12 parents and 3.5% of the MEES parents responding to the questionnaire said their children are not receiving adequate health care. The reason given most often for not receiving adequate health care was lack of financial resources.

38 38 Educational Support in the Home Some concerns about parental support: –Books in the home –Reading to children –Helping with homework

39 39 Educational Support in the Home Data Collection: Parent Questionnaires 1) More than 1,900 questionnaires were administered by MEES staff during home visits in 19 MEP regions. 2) Over 430 questionnaires were completed at meetings and trainings in 5 MEP regions.

40 40 Educational Support in the Home Highlights of findings: 76% reported having childrens books in Spanish. 56% reported having childrens books in English 88% read to their child at least once per week 46% have a library card

41 41 Educational Support in the Home Highlights of findings: (continued) 76% reported spending at least 1 hour per week to helping with homework 66% reported feeling comfortable in helping with math homework

42 42 Out-of-School Youth (OSY) Migrant students under the age of 22 who have not graduated from high school and are not in school pursuing a high school diploma. In 2004-05, California MEP identified 37,132 OSY May be under-counted due to lack of identification and lack of services

43 43 Out-of-School Youth (OSY) Two Groups: Drop-outs: Youth who have attended school in the U.S. Here to Work: Youth who have not attended school in the U.S.; educational levels range from very little formal education to completion of 8th grade or higher.

44 44 Out of School Youth We obtained data for both drop-outs and here to work youth in the following areas: Reasons for leaving school Educational goals Health & Socio-economic needs Data gathered from 541 OSY in Regions 1 & 11 between 2002 and 2005

45 45 Out-of-School Youth (OSY) Reasons for leaving school given most often: Drop-outs:: low credits or age (28%) or unmotivated (22%) Here to Work: 39% left school in order to work

46 46 Out-of-School Youth (OSY) Educational goals most often given: Drop-outs: Earning a high school diploma (53%) Here to Work: English as a Second Language (83%)

47 47 Out-of-School Youth (OSY) Health needs reported: Over half of all OSY reported a medical or dental need. Close to 2/3 of Here to Work youth reported medical, dental, and/or vision needs.

48 48 Out-of-School Youth (OSY) Socioeconomic needs cited most often by OSY: Counseling & Clothing (49%) Transportation (41%) Drug and Alcohol Intervention (40%)

49 49 Data is not collected in the same way in every region Examples: Health services, OSY, Parental Support Data is not centrally aggregated Examples: Health services, OSY, school attendance Limitations of available data

50 50 Limitations of available data Statewide data does not identify migrant students. Examples: 1) Healthy Kids Survey 2) First Five pre-school services Data is not available regarding services received from non-MEP sources Example: Math supplemental services

51 51 Next Steps for CNA Management Team Long-Term: –Flag migrant and prior migrant students in statewide databases –Ensure that all regions collect the same data in the same form –Increase aggregation of regional data at state level Statewide Data Collection

52 52 For more information on the CNA process, please contact: Jorge Gaj, Consultant (916) 322-3048 jgaj@cde.ca.gov

53 53 State Service Delivery Plan Overview Bilingual Coordinators Network November 29, 2007

54 54 Why a State Service Delivery Plan? Required by law (NCLB) Helps the SEA develop and articulate a clear vision of statewide services to migrant students for the next 5 years

55 55 State Service Delivery Plan The state plan will articulate: –The needs of migrant children based on the CNA and available data. –The Migrant Education Programs performance targets and measurable program outcomes.

56 56 State Service Delivery Plan The state plan will articulate: –The strategies and interventions used by the Migrant Education Program to achieve the performance targets and measurable objectives. –How the state will evaluate program effectiveness relative to performance targets and measurable outcomes.

57 57 State Service Delivery Plan In coordination with federal guidelines and the CNA, the MEP state plan will focus on the following areas: Reading Mathematics High School Graduation/OSY School Readiness Health

58 58 State Plan Development Process Management Team Work Groups Experts and researchers Timeline

59 59 For more information on the State Delivery Plan, please contact: Linda Rivera, Consultant (916) 319-0730 lrivera@cde.ca.gov


Download ppt "1 Migrant Education Comprehensive Needs Assessment Overview Preliminary Report Jorge Gaj, California Department of Education Margit Birge, California Comprehensive."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google