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…to raise new ideas and improve policy debates through quality information and analysis on issues shaping New Hampshires future. Education Funding and.

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Presentation on theme: "…to raise new ideas and improve policy debates through quality information and analysis on issues shaping New Hampshires future. Education Funding and."— Presentation transcript:

1 …to raise new ideas and improve policy debates through quality information and analysis on issues shaping New Hampshires future. Education Funding and Policy in NH Leadership Seacoast March 5, 2014 New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies Board of Directors William H. Dunlap, Chair David Alukonis Eric Herr Dianne Mercier James Putnam Todd I. Selig Michael Whitney Daniel Wolf Martin L. Gross, Chair Emeritus Directors Emeritus Sheila T. Francoeur Stuart V. Smith, Jr. Donna Sytek Brian F. Walsh Kimon S. Zachos

2 So what? Why are we even having this discussion? Why have we been talking about education funding for the past 15 years?

3 3 Before reform, NH was last in state aid for schools. Heres why…

4 4 The education decision The responsibility for ensuring the provision of an adequate public education and an adequate level of resources for all students in New Hampshire lies with the State. The tax decision To the extent that the property tax is used in the future to fund the provision of an adequate education, the tax must be administered in a manner that is equal in valuation and uniform in rate throughout the State. Claremont II Decision: 1997

5 State aid jumps after ruling

6 EQUITY

7 7

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10 10 Change in Taxpayer Equity The initial increase in taxpayer equity (although never fully realized) eroded away by Change in Pupil Equity No change in pupil equity ever occurred.

11 ADEQUACY

12 Finding a benchmark 2006 NH Supreme Court case determined that adequate education was never sufficiently defined by Legislature. New definition is for opportunity for an adequate education –Inputs = courses offered, staffing, funding, etc. –Outputs = test scores, graduation rates, attendance rates, etc.

13 Teachers = $47,267 –1 teacher/25 students (K-2) = $1,891 per pupil –1 teacher/30 students (3-12) = $1,576 per pupil Specialty teachers = $330 per pupil Principals = $202 per pupil Guidance counselors = $130 per pupil Library media specialists = $95 per pupil Custodians = $73 per pupil Facilities maintenance = $195 per pupil Technology = $75 per pupil Instructional materials = $250 per pupil Transportation = $315 per pupil The Magic Number: $3,456 per pupil

14 Differentiated Aid for at-risk populations Economically disadvantaged $1,750 per low-income student English language learners $685 per student Special education students $1,882 per student Poor performers $685 for each 3 rd grader who tests below grade level in reading

15 The current landscape

16 School revenue: Largely a local affair

17 NH below national average in state funding... New Hampshire

18 ... but we spend more per student overall New Hampshire

19 Were in a high-spending region

20 The problem is still the disparity across the state in education spending, outcomes, and property valuations (i.e., the basis for spending) Franklin $8,370 per pupil spending $460,000 per pupil valuation 60% low-income students 63% 3 rd Graders proficient in math Newington $32,029 per pupil spending $12.4 million per pupil val. 10% low-income students 100% 3rd grd proficient in math Whats the concern?

21 Regional variation is significant

22 Spending & student success

23 Impact on policy: Four big questions What do we want from our education system? How should we measure success? Who are interested parties in this discussion? What are their priorities? What outside trends are shaping education in NH?

24 What do you want your 18-year-old to be able to do when he or she graduates high school? 1. What is the desired outcome?

25 2. What do we measure? –Spending per pupil –English-language learners –Racial/ethnic breakdowns by district –Poverty rates by district –Teacher/student ratios –Teacher salaries –Teacher educational attainment –Graduation rates –Drop-out rates –College placement rates –Attendance rates –Test score, test scores, test scores

26 Students Parents Business community Higher education community Society at large 3. Interested parties

27 4. What about demographics? What does education policy mean for a state that is: –Growing older, –Raising fewer school-aged children, –Seeing a significant shift in its pattern and rates of in-migration?

28 Student trends moving in one direction

29 What kind of educational system should we be building, based on what this map tells us? 73 high schools 100 SAUs 160+ school districts

30 New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies Want to learn more? Online: nhpolicy.org Facebook: facebook.com/nhpolicy Our blog: policyblognh.org (603) Board of Directors Sheila T. Francoeur, Chair David Alukonis William H. Dunlap Eric Herr Dianne Mercier Richard Ober James Putnam Stephen J. Reno Stuart V. Smith, Jr. Donna Sytek Brian F. Walsh Michael Whitney Martin L. Gross, Chair Emeritus Todd I. Selig Kimon S. Zachos Directors Emeritus …to raise new ideas and improve policy debates through quality information and analysis on issues shaping New Hampshires future.


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