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Using an Activities Planning Matrix Mary Reed. …not a place. All students should have access to the general education curriculum. …the education of children.

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Presentation on theme: "Using an Activities Planning Matrix Mary Reed. …not a place. All students should have access to the general education curriculum. …the education of children."— Presentation transcript:

1 Using an Activities Planning Matrix Mary Reed

2 …not a place. All students should have access to the general education curriculum. …the education of children with disabilities can be made more effective by having high expectations for such children and ensuring their access to the general curriculum to the maximum extent possible. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 1997 Special education is a resource…. The general education classroom is the first consideration for all students.

3 serve same function as the problem behavior Instructional Priorities for Students with Autism Replacement Skills: General Skills: Coping and Tolerance Skills: broad skills that alter problem behaviors and prevent the need for additional support learning to tolerate difficult situations and cope with frustration

4 Its difficult to create an individualized, yet predictable schedule for Miguel that provides a suitable balance of participation in the community, vocational, social and academic activities. How can this be achieved? I am accountable for the learning of all my students, including Maria, though her educational goals are very different from those of the others. How can I make sure Maria has enough opportunities and support to meet her goals throughout the activities of our weekly schedule, but without compromising the learning of the other students? Reactions from Teachers There are many times I feel Nicole could learn things so much better if I could just provide more individual instruction and additional practice for her. But with so many other students in class each day, its nearly impossible to make this happen. James needs to learn so many skills that arent addressed specifically in our academic curriculum. How do I determine which of his targeted skills to focus on for each activity? What adaptations will James need to meet his academic goals?

5 What is an Activities Matrix? ….a tool that can be used to identify opportunities and plan for the instruction of students with individual educational goals within the context of typical educational activities. Targeted Individual Skills Instructional Circumstances Time/Activity Morning circle 8:00-8:30 Reading Readiness 8;30-10:15 Specials 10:15-10:45 Math 10:45-11:30 Science/ Social Studies 12:00-1:00 Lunch 11:30-12:00 Activity choice 1:00 – 1:30 Story time Afternoon circle 1:30-2:05 Instructional Outcomes Same as other students Recognizes all vocabulary words Same as other students Rote count by 10s to 100 State 3 requirements for plant growth Same as other students Responding to specific questions Asking for help or materials Sharing materials/toys with peers Speaking in full sentences Initiating social exchange with peers completing cooperative group activities

6 Emphasizes the benefits of inclusion Clarifies successful outcomes for all students Identify potential opportunities to address specific educational goals Instructional Outcomes Same as other students Recognizes all vocabulary words Same as other students Rote count by 10s to 100 State 3 requirements for plant growth Same as other students Responding to specific questions Asking for help or materials Sharing materials/toys with peers Speaking in full sentences Initiating social exchange with peers completing cooperative group activities Targeted Individual Skills Instructional Circumstances Time/Activity Morning circle 8:00-8:30 Reading Readiness 8;30-10:15 Specials 10:15-10:45 Math 10:45-11:30 Science/ Social Studies 12:00-1:00 Lunch 11:30-12:00 Activity choice 1:00 – 1:30 Story time Afternoon circle 1:30-2:05 Participate in lunch conversation

7 Plan instructional activities Develop curricular adaptations Utilize environmental supports Individualizing the activity for the learning characteristics and needs of the focus student. Because I used an activity planning matrix, I knew our seed planting activity would be a good opportunity to address Marias social goals. The activity planning matrix made it a lot easier to then think about the supports she would need in it to be successful in the activity. Environmental supports Curricular adaptations leaves stem roots

8 Identify opportunities to incorporate the students unique strengths and interests into instructional activities James JANUARY 20-25, 2008 Language arts Reading spelling Specials Math Social studies Science Working independently Record assignments in planner Gather work materials Raise hand to particpate or respond Work without disruptions

9 Academics goals Self management goals Social goals James JANUARY Insure all goals and objectives have been addressed adequately Language arts Reading spelling Specials Math Social studies Science Working independently Raise hand to particpate or respond Work without disruptions Completing work on the computer Gather work materials Record assignments in planner

10 Manage Additional Resources and Supports Nicole October Instructional Circumstances Targeted Individual Skills Instructional Outcomes Time/Activity Reading Specials Math Science/ Lunch Social studies Language arts Learning centers Responding to questions Remaining in seat or area Attending to printed materials Working quietly Raising hand for help or attention ESE teacher, MWF ESE teacher, 9:15-9:30 Tu, Th, Fr Speech pathologist 1:10 – 1:20, Mon, Wed, Fri Classroom paraprofessional, 2:00-2:10, Mon-Thurs

11 What is an Activities Matrix? ….a tool that can be used to identify opportunities and plan for the instruction of students with individual educational goals within the context of typical educational activities. Targeted Individual Skills Instructional Circumstances Time/Activity Morning circle 8:00-8:30 Reading Readiness 8;30-10:15 Specials 10:15-10:45 Math 10:45-11:30 Science/ Social Studies 12:00-1:00 Lunch 11:30-12:00 Activity choice 1:00 – 1:30 Story time Afternoon circle 1:30-2:05 Instructional Outcomes Same as other students Recognizes all vocabulary words Same as other students Rote count by 10s to 100 State 3 requirements for plant growth Same as other students Responding to specific questions Remains with peers Manipulates variety of materials Req/offers materials to peers Uses writing utensil w/ modified grip Physically navigates environment SLPOTPT

12 Develop an individualized schedule for the student Supports individualized scheduling Insures balance across instructional areas Promotes team based planning

13 Provide Accountability Consistent supervision and instruction across team members Provides a written record

14 How Do I Do It? A blank activity planning matrix The daily classroom schedule Students IEP A curriculum guide Time

15 Include any regularly occurring, non- instructional activities Specialized services Instructional activities outside the classroom Community participation activities Work experience List the sequence of daily school activities down the left hand column Activity choice 1:30-2:05 Instructional Circumstances Time Activity 8:00-8:30 Morning circle 8;30-10:15 Reading Readiness 10:15-10:45Specials 10:45-11:30Lunch 12:00-1:00 Science/ Social Studies 1:00 – 1:30 Story time Afternoon circle 2:02-2:15Dismissal

16 Address current top priorities Address others as needed Some goals and objectives will be addressed consistently across all activities Others are associated with very specific times and places List the students instructional goals and objectives across the top Instructional Circumstances Time Activity 8:00-8:30 Morning circle 8;30-10:15 Reading Readiness 10:15-10:45Specials 10:45-11:30Lunch 12:00-1:00 Science/ Social Studies 1:00 – 1:30 Story time Afternoon circle 2:02-2:15Dismissal 1:30-2:05 Activity choice Sharing materials/t Speaking in full sentences Initiating social exchange completing group activities Asking for help or materials Targeted Individual Skills

17 Decide the students level of participation in each activity Determine extent top learning priorities can be addressed within the proposed activity Not every activity will provide the right circumstances Creative solutions Alternative activity or setting Instruction at home

18 How can the students learning priorities, such a making friends or gaining better independence, be addressed through this activity? What changes either in the activity itself or the classroom environment, may be needed to meet the students instructional goal? Are there any other supports that will be necessary in order for the student to be successful? Determine the necessary accommodations, modifications and supports

19 How Do I Know If Its Working? Is the student meeting the learning outcomes youve set for them in each activity? Do you feel the accommodations, modifications and supports youve created are promoting the students learning and success? Have you gathered data that demonstrates an increase in targeted skills? Do other team members feel the student is being successful in their activities and interactions? Do you and your team members feel the Activities Planning Matrix allows you to plan in a more precise, efficient yet creative manner?

20 Doyle, M.B. (1997). The paraprofessionals guide to the inclusive classroom: working as a team. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes. Falvey, M., Coots, J., Bishop, K., & Grenot-Scheyer, M. (1989). Educational and curricular adaptations. In S. Stainback, W. Stainback & M. Forest. (Eds.). Educating all Students in the mainstream of regular education (pp ). Baltimore, MD: Brookes. Giangreco, M.F., Cloninger, C.J., & Iverson, V.S. (1993). Choosing options and accommodations for children: a guide to planning inclusive education. Baltimore, MD: Brookes. Rainforth, B., York, J., & MacDonald, C. (1992). Collaborative teams for students with severe disabilities. Baltimore, MD: Brookes. Williams, W. & Fox, T. (1989). Individual program design series. Burlington: Center for Developmental Disabilities, University of Vermont. Where Can I Learn More?

21 Blank Forms Planning matrix Completed example Planning matrix with instructional outcomes Completed example Planning matrix with support codes Completed example


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