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Developing a Professional Portfolio Sarah Macdonald, Nova Scotia Agricultural College Janice Landry, St. Francis Xavier University CAUCE Conference 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Developing a Professional Portfolio Sarah Macdonald, Nova Scotia Agricultural College Janice Landry, St. Francis Xavier University CAUCE Conference 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing a Professional Portfolio Sarah Macdonald, Nova Scotia Agricultural College Janice Landry, St. Francis Xavier University CAUCE Conference 2012 Saskatoon, SK May 29, 2012

2 2 Session Objectives 1. Participants will identify the differing aspects of leadership within university continuing education 2. Participants will reflect on their experience as practitioners to enhance their ability to develop a professional portfolio. 3. Participants will explore how practitioners can use the development of a professional portfolio as a tool to reflect on and reveal their own practice. 4. Participants will explore the professional portfolio as a means to advocate for the practice of CE at their institution.

3 3 ACTIVITY: Why prepare a Professional/Personal Portfolio?

4 4 Why a Professional/Personal Portfolio? University Continuing Education is complex and multi-layered. The description of continuing education practice provided by continuing educators is much richer and more multifarious than anything described in the literature. (Percival, 1993, p. 142) A portfolio is a presentation of artifacts that reveals the complex nature of Continuing Education One of your greatest assets as a continuing educator will be your ability to reflect on and learn from your experiences in practice. Learning is vital to your development as an adult educator. (Percival, 1993, p. 144)

5 Background Both of our journeys included graduate studies Enriched our views of our own practice Two models of Leadership re continuing education Moroney, 2007 & Landry,

6 ACTIVITY: Roles of CE LEADERSHIP

7 7 Lived Experience of University Continuing Education Leaders (Landry, 2011) – Themes & Experiences Theme 1: Administrative Leaders as Functional Leaders Funding/financial responsibilities/pressures Represents Continuing Education/University Quality assurance/best practices Theme 2: Administrative Leaders as Human Resource Leaders Valuing/Supporting Staff Developing Staff Processes Mentoring/Empowering Staff Theme 3: Rhythm of Administration Collaboration Accessibility/Responsive to needs of learners Variety/Diversity Creativity/ Innovation/Development Risk

8 Lived Experience of University Continuing Education Leaders (Landry, 2011) – 6 themes Theme 4: Historical Influence on Current Practice Attitudes and culture towards unit Restructuring of the unit Theme 5: Voice of Administrators Intra-university relationships Positioning Continuing Education Community relationships Strategic planning Continuing Education as value-added Professional development connections Theme 6: Spirit of Administration Continuing Education as a career Healthy work/life balance Sense of mission Personal/professional growth In touch with your own values 8

9 Some Elements in a Professional Portfolio Curriculum vitae (CV) Philosophy Reflections Letter to self Journalling Metaphors Paragraph about your competencies Artifacts Brochures/Flyers Certifications – Academic and Informal Learning Evidence – Letters of appreciation Personal Inspirations Performance Reviews/Course Evaluations Org Chart 9

10 ACTIVITY: What Elements are Important for Your Portfolio? 10

11 How Can This Be Organized??? Themes/Dimensions/Domains of Practice Evidence (Artifacts) Reflections

12 Continuing Education Leadership Matrix (Moroney, 2007)

13 Entrepreneur Domain

14 Entrepreneur - Reflection Element Combining business goals and academic pursuits is often an area of conflict within academic institutions... Landry (2011) speaks of the importance of balance in CE leadership. It is hard to find the balance between being entrepreneurial and leading in continuing education. My tactic for dealing with this area is always to make the pie bigger; for example, demonstrate that the more opportunities we have through good market research, development and business planning, the more that we can contribute to adult education in agriculture. 14

15 Entrepreneur – Artifact Element 15 ItemTypeSignificance Brochure of CE (general)OriginalIntended for general market Program BrochuresOriginalTargeted to a specific audience Extended Learning slidePrintExplanation to faculty of program roles Cartoon SlidePrint Reminder that enthusiasm for new projects must balance with resources available. Excerpt from SpreadsheetPrintBudget analysis and forecast preparation

16 16 Reflection Wilson & Hayes (2000) stated We also believe that adult and continuing education is also essentially a human endeavor, a social practice of human interaction that depends significantly upon its practitioners assumptions, values, and experiences to shape practical actions, action themselves that are profoundly affected by the larger socio-cultural-economic-political conditions in which they take place… Informed professional action also depends significantly on how practitioners rely upon their assumptions, values, and experiences to see and thus shape their daily work... professional practice represents a complex interaction of educator and context (p. 17).

17 Lived Experience - University Continuing Education Leaders (Landry (2011) 17

18 Further Reflections Cervero and Wilson (2006) point out, education is a struggle for knowledge and power. Educational programs matter because they create possible futures in the lives of people, organizations and communities. (p. 91) 18

19 Tables of Contents Janices Section One - Personal Thoughts and Reflections Letter to Self Personal Philosophy of adult education Reflections Metaphor Section Two – Organizational Info Organizatonal chart Relationships Section Three - Leadership Style Section Four - Assessment Instruments Section Five – Other Connections / Influences Aha moments Lessons Learned Reference List Sarahs Summary3 Introduction4 Curriculum vitae 6 Philosophy of Adult Education 10 My Adult Education Practice12 Academic13 Reflection13 Artifacts14 Entrepreneur 15 Reflection15 Artifacts16 Administrator 17 Reflection17 Artifacts18 Adult Educator 19 Reflection19 Artifacts21 Conclusion22 Citation List23 19

20 20 Sharing our Story Continuing education practice is complex and multi-layered. An opportunity to look a the taken-for-grantedness of practice An awareness of the depth and layers of practice and opportunity to share the story. Townsend (2002) revealed that sharing on the job stories can be a powerful way to gain deeper understanding of your work and reinvigorate your passion for educational leadership (p. 1). Awareness is the first step to being a good advocate!

21 Professional Portfolios The portfolio is a way of demonstrating competency and skill, commitment to ongoing professional development and informal learning/lifelong learning. It also supports reflection and realization regarding practice and praxis. With a heightened awareness of who we are as practitioners, we can develop strategies to increase our influence and advocacy within the university, for ourselves, for lifelong and distance learning, and for the learners and communities we serve. As advocates for the learners and the communities we serve, it is important for us to be in touch with our professional practice. 21

22 22 Wilson & Hayes (2000) stated We also believe that adult and continuing education is also essentially a human endeavor, a social practice of human interaction that depends significantly upon its practitioners assumptions, values, and experiences to shape practical actions, action themselves that are profoundly affected by the larger socio-cultural-economic-political conditions in which they take place… Informed professional action also depends significantly on how practitioners rely upon their assumptions, values, and experiences to see and thus shape their daily work... professional practice represents a complex interaction of educator and context (p. 17).

23 23 References Becker, C. (1992). Living and relating: An introduction to phenomenology. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. Caffarella, R. S. (2002). Planning programs for adult learners: A practical guide for educators, trainers and staff developers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Cervero, R. M., & Wilson, A. L. (2006). Working the planning table: Negotiating democratically for adult, continuing and workplace education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Crotty, M. (2003). The foundations of social research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. Fleming, J. E., & Caffarella, R. (2000). Leadership for adult and continuing education. In T. J. Sork, V. L. Chapman, & R. St. Clair (Eds.), Proceedings of the 41st Annual Adult Education Research Conference (pp ). Vancouver, Canada: The University of British Columbia. Landry, J. (2011). Lived experience of university continuing education leaders. Canadian Journal of University Continuing Education, 37(2), Moroney, P. (2007). Continuing education leadership matrix: A model for practitioners in higher education. Canadian Journal of University Continuing Education, 33(1), 61–82. Moustakas, C. (1994). Phenomenological research methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Patton, M. (2002). Qualitative research and evaluation methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Percival, A. (1993). Practicing theory: A guide to becoming an effective adult education programmer. Saskatoon, SK: University of Saskatchewan. Townsend, R. (2002). Telling stories. Leadership, 31 (4), Wilson, A. & Hayes, E. (2000). On thought and action in adult and continuing education. In A. Wilson, & E. Hayes (Eds). Handbook of adult and continuing education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

24 Questions? Thoughts? 24

25 Appendix: Domain Artifacts – Academic Administrative Adult Educator 25

26 Academic Domain - Artifacts 26 ItemTypeSignificance Title Page, 4 th Year ProjectPhotocopyUndergraduate quantitative research Factsheet published by provincial government department PhotocopyResearch and writing in a specialized topic for non-academic audience Governor Generals MedalPhotoAcademic Achievement Poster Promoting Teaching Awards PrintChaired Selection Committee Master Gardener PresentationCDPresented information about horticulture program to an academic association (CADAP) Invitation to Participate Collaboration with NSAC Researchers in a Research Proposal

27 Administrative Domain - Artifacts 27 ItemTypeSignificance Certificate in Tech Ed ProgramBrochure Demonstrates administrative leadership; innovation for business growth H1N1 PlanPrint Staff participated in working out a process for emergency plan Strategies and Actions DocumentPrint Table that articulates goals, activities, outcomes; HR and communication planning tool. Program Priority Rating ChartPrint Consensus based planning tool – is an HR management tool as well Enrollment DocumentPrint Demonstrates proficiency in data and conversion of data using pivot tables in Excel

28 Adult Educator - Artifacts 28 ItemTypeSignificance PEI Farm Tech PresentationCD Communication to Canadian Agriculture Human Resource Council (CAHRC) Our Approach to CECDPresentation to Tanzanian visitors Invitation to PEI Farm Tech CeremonyCopy Celebration with adult learners at the end of their block release program. CAUCE letterCopyAcknowledgement of liaison work from Master Gardener Local CoordinatorPrint Recognition of flexibility, support and faith in adult learners St. FX Adult Ed. CertificateCopyProgram completed in Excerpt from St. FX Research ReportPrint Completion of the Masters of Adult Education Program. This excerpt demonstrates findings of my research.


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