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Federal Policy Update: Afterschool and Summer Learning Erik Peterson, Afterschool Alliance Bob Seidel, National Summer Learning Association.

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Presentation on theme: "Federal Policy Update: Afterschool and Summer Learning Erik Peterson, Afterschool Alliance Bob Seidel, National Summer Learning Association."— Presentation transcript:

1 Federal Policy Update: Afterschool and Summer Learning Erik Peterson, Afterschool Alliance Bob Seidel, National Summer Learning Association

2 The Plan Group Discussion: Federal Policy Opportunities? Policy Update: – Appropriations, Budget and the Sequester – Elementary and Secondary Education Act – Flexibility Waivers – Other federal funding opportunities Advocating for Summer Learning and Afterschool Discussion: Q and A

3 Group Discussion: What are your Goals? Federal Policy Opportunities & Questions?

4 Policy Update Focus on big fiscal issues, which affect everything, including education Money is going to be very, very tight for the foreseeable future. (appropriations)

5 Policy Update: Public Policy Tools Authorizing legislation (laws) Appropriations (money) Regulations (administrative rules)

6 Policy Update: Federal Funding (FY 2013) Congress recently passed a 6 month continuing resolution (CR) last fall that funds the federal government through March 27, – The CR includes a 0.6% increase (6/10ths of a percent) above the FY 2012 levels of funding for nearly every discretionary program – including Department of Education programs. – Outlook: Final CR? Omnibus? Cuts likely

7 Policy Update: Federal Funding (FY2014) Presidents proposal to be announced this month? Senate & House expected to pass budget resolutions Appropriations hearings scheduled

8 Policy Update: 21 st CCLC Federal Funding

9 Policy Update: The Sequester Across the Board Spending Cut Non Defense Discretionary programs estimated to be cut by 5.1% Approximately 30,000 low-income children lose CCDBG $750 million cut to Title I Grants: 2,500 schools impacted serving more than 1 million disadvantaged students. 21 st CCLC: about 50,000 young people would lose afterschool and summer learning supports

10 Policy Update: Bottom Line No new federal programs Additional funding will be difficult Summer & afterschool not yet part of the core policy But… Policymakers want to see results & bang for the buck More time for learning is currently hot

11 Policy Update: ESEA New Congress, new bills to be introduced:S.326 House Education and the Workforce Committee: Used piecemeal approach last Congress Senate Health, Education, Pensions & Labor Committee: Introduced bipartisan legislation

12 Policy Update: Expanded Learning – Administration Blueprint Proposal – Senate ESEA Language – FY 11 Appropriations Language – FY12 Appropriations Language – FY13 Appropriations Language – Pending Non-Regulatory Guidance – Flexibility Waivers

13 Policy Update: ESEA Waivers The Administration has approved waivers for most states that basically end many of the central tenets of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. In addition, states have the option of requesting to allow 21 st CCLC funds to be used to support expanded learning time activities. The purpose of this optional waiver is to allow 21 st CCLC funds to be used to support expanded learning time during the school day in addition to activities provided during non-school hours. Title I SES funds made more flexible – summer learning and afterschool as potential uses

14 Policy Update: ESEA Waivers 34 states (including the District of Columbia) have been granted waivers. * These states did not select the optional 21 st CCLC program waiver. Arizona*Georgia*Michigan*New YorkSouth Dakota* Arkansas*IndianaMinnesota*North CarolinaTennessee Colorado*KansasMississippi*OhioUtah ConnecticutKentuckyMissouri*OklahomaVirginia DelawareLouisianaNevada*OregonWashington* District of Columbia*MarylandNew JerseyRhode Island*Wisconsin* FloridaMassachusettsNew MexicoSouth Carolina*

15 Policy Update: Race to the Top – District Grants The U.S. Department of Education announced in December that 16 applicantsrepresenting 55 school districts across 11 states and D.C.have won the 2012 Race to the Top-District competition. These districts will share nearly $400 million to support locally developed plans to personalize and deepen student learning, directly improve student achievement and educator effectiveness, close achievement gaps, and prepare every student to succeed in college and their careers.

16 Policy Update: Other Opportunities

17 Potential new opportunities STEM Wellness Violence Prevention

18 Policy Update: Questions?

19 Advocacy: Making the Case America After 3PM 2009 Compared to 2004 National Percentages Kids in Afterschool Programs15%11% Kids in Self Care26%25% Kids in Sibling Care14%11% Parents Satisfied with Afterschool Program 89%91% Kids Who Would Participate if a Program were Available 38%30% Kids in Summer Learning Programs 25% million kids participate in afterschool programs 15.1 million kids on their own after school 25% of students participate in summer learning programs

20 Advocacy: Making the Case

21 Do you want your newly elected federal, state and local leaders to provide MORE funding for afterschool programs? * Do you want your newly elected federal, state and local leaders to provide funding for afterschool programs? * *Asked of half the sample. 2010: 65% Yes (51% Strong Yes) Time Series: 2008: 76% Yes (59% Strong Yes) 2006: 73% Yes (58% Strong Yes)

22 Advocacy: Making the Case Afterschool & summer learning programs: Keep kids safe Support wellness – nutrition and exercise Engage kids in learning Help working families Afterschool programs at their best when they complement but dont replicate the school day Summer learning – opportunity for innovative teaching & learning Afterschool & summer learning programs are also community-school partnerships

23 Advocacy: Making an Action Plan Things to think about: What are your immediate goals? Long-term, short-term, immediate? Who are your allies? Who supports summer learning or afterschool in your community? Who are you targeting? What is the win-win? How do you plan to get the attention of each target?

24 Advocacy: Discussion Who supports afterschool and summer learning programs in your community?

25 Advocacy: Reach Out Call, write or Meet district staff Visit Congressional offices in Washington

26 Advocacy: Arrange a site visit

27 Advocacy: Invite the media Plagiarize freely! – from our websites Create a media list Identify 2-3 key messages Structure events with media in mind Appeal to the press, build relationships Issue press releases

28 Summer Learning Day is a grassroots movement to spread awareness about the issue of summer learning loss among parents and policymakers. JOIN THE MOVEMENT ON Friday, June 21, #SLD2013

29 REGISTER TODAY! summerlearning.org/conference Advancing Outcomes for Youth: Demonstrating Your Value in a Data-Driven Age."

30 Lights On Afterschool October 17, 2013

31 Discussion Questions and Answers

32 Contact Us Bob Seidel, National Summer Learning Association Erik Peterson, Afterschool Alliance


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