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William Glassers Choice Theory and Quality Teaching Presented by: Michelle Burton-Moyes Deanna Richard Sharon McRae.

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Presentation on theme: "William Glassers Choice Theory and Quality Teaching Presented by: Michelle Burton-Moyes Deanna Richard Sharon McRae."— Presentation transcript:

1 William Glassers Choice Theory and Quality Teaching Presented by: Michelle Burton-Moyes Deanna Richard Sharon McRae

2 William Glasser Background A psychiatrist Thought to be one of the greatest educational thinkers of our time Contends that behaviour in school will not improve until we change the way we work with students

3 Choice Theory Student behaviour is determined by student choice, not teacher control

4 Foundational Assertions for Choice Theory We cannot make students do anything, but we can influence them to do things that lead to better behaviour and increased success It is up to teachers to make school adequately interesting and otherwise satisfying to students needs

5 Major Concepts in Glassers Non-coercive Discipline All human behaviour is purposeful We are responsible for our own behaviour All of our behaviour is our best attempt to meet five basic needs Students feel pleasure when their basic needs are met and frustration when they are not At least half of todays students will not commit themselves to learning if they find their school experience boring, frustrating, or otherwise dissatisfying

6 Major Concepts in Glassers Non-coercive Discipline Few students in todays schools do their best work If todays schools are to be successful, they must create quality conditions that greatly reduce student and teacher frustration What schools require is a new commitment to quality education The school curriculum should be limited to learnings that are useful or otherwise relevant to students lives

7 Major Concepts in Glassers Non-coercive Discipline Students should be allowed to acquire in- depth information about topics they consider useful or interesting Quality learning is evident when students become able to demonstrate or explain how, why, and where their learnings are valuable Instead of scolding, coercing, or punishing, teachers should try to befriend their students, provide encouragement and stimulation, and show unending willingness to help

8 Major Concepts in Glassers Noncoercive Discipline Teachers who dictate procedures, order students to work, and berate them when they do not are increasingly ineffective with todays students Teachers who provide a stimulating learning environment, encourage students and help them as much as possible are most effective with todays learners Motivation is the key ingredient in learning

9 Major Concepts in Glassers Non-Coercive Discipline Teachers who dictate procedures, order students to work, and berate them when they do not are increasingly ineffective with todays students (Glasser calls these teachers boss teachers ) Teachers who provide a stimulating learning environment, encourage students, and help them as much as possible are most effective with todays learners (Glasser calls these teachers lead teachers ) Motivation is the key ingredient in learning

10 Any Program of Quality Education Must Meet Students Needs Survival needs are met when the school environment is kept safe and free from personal threat Students sense belonging when they receive attention from the teacher and others and participate actively in class concerns Students sense power when the teacher asks them to participate in making decisions about topics to be studied and procedure for working in class or assigns them responsibility for class duties Students experience fun when they are able to work and talk with others, engage in interesting activities and share their accomplishments Students sense freedom when the teacher allows them to make responsible choices concerning what they will study, how they will do so, and how they will demonstrate their accomplishments

11 Student Needs

12 Main things schools can do to improve student behaviour and learning are: Provide an engaging curriculum Emphasize quality Influence students non-coercively to make good choices about learning and responsible conduct

13 Quality Curriculum Schools must be places where students learn useful information and learn it well Glasser suggests that if students are old enough you may ask them to identify what they would like to explore in depthlearning a smaller number of topics in depth is preferable to covering many topics superficially Quality learning requires depth of understanding combined with a good grasp of its value Ask students to explain why the material they have learned is valuable Ask students regularly to assess the quality of their own efforts

14 Quality Teaching Provide a warm, supportive classroom climate Use lead teaching rather than boss teaching Ask students only to do work that is useful (knowledge and skills that they will make use of in their lives) Always ask students to do the best they can Ask students to evaluate work they have done and improve it Ask students to explain why they feel their work has high quality Ask students how they think they might improve their work further Progressively help students learn to use self-evaluation, improvement and repetition Help students recognize that doing quality work makes them feel good Help students see that quality work is never destructive to them, others or the environment

15 Seven Deadly Habits vs. Seven Connecting Habits Deadly Habits Criticizing Blaming Complaining Nagging Threatening Punishing Rewarding students to control them Connecting Habits Caring Listening Supporting Contributing Encouraging Trusting Befriending

16 Relation of Quality Teaching to Discipline Misbehaviour can be reduced greatly if teachers do the following: Work with students to establish standards of conduct in the classroom Discuss the importance of quality work Ask students about class behaviour they believe will help them get their work done and truly help them learn Ask for student advice on what should happen when behaviour agreements are brokenbehaviour problems are best solved by looking for ways to correct the underlying problem

17 Relation of Quality Teaching to Discipline (contd) Whenever appropriate, ask students what you the teacher could do to help Once agreements and consequences are established they should be put in writing and all students should sign the document Agreements established and dealt with in this way show that the teachers main concern is quality, not power Hold classroom meetings to explore alternatives to inappropriate behaviour

18 Gaining Benefits of Quality Classrooms Replace deadly habits with connecting habits Make plain how you will work with students Befriend your students Establish reasonable rules of class behaviour Take the energy out of impending misbehaviour

19 Gaining Benefits of Quality Classrooms Teach things that make a real difference in students lives Help students learn to strive for quality explain that you will ask students to work at any given assignment until they have achieved an acceptably high level of competence and that nobody will fail or receive a low grade Test students frequently, but productively explain that tests are for learning only and promise that no one will fail or receive a bad grade Emphasize understanding and making use of new learning Provide options for students after competence is achieved e.g. help other students or move ahead to something of higher quality

20 Implementing Glassers Ideas in the Classroom Remember that your students behaviour is internally motivated and purposeful adjust your curriculum to help students meet those needs Remember that your students will not commit themselves to class activities they find boring, frustrating or dissatisfying Hold a discussion with your class on how school could be made more interesting and enjoyable

21 Implementing Glassers Ideas in the Classroom Following the class discussion, indicate that you will try to organize activities as students suggested and that you will do all you can to help them learn and succeed Hold meetings with your class to discuss new efforts and any results you see in classwork and behaviourfocus on improving learning Befriend students and provide encouragement and stimulation

22 Implementing Glassers Ideas in the Classroom Ask students what kinds of class behaviours will help them improve class behaviour while acquiring quality learning When students misbehave, discuss their behaviour and why it was important and what they feel they could do to avoid misbehaving in the future

23 Teacher Survey Needs and their DefinitionsStrength and Satisfaction Rating Scale Love and Belonging: The need for interpersonal contact, working together with others, and the potential for developing long term relationships and friendships. To feel wanted and approved of by colleagues as well as superiors. Need Strength: Need Satisfaction: Self-Worth/Power: The need for a sense of empowerment, competence and opportunities for personal effectiveness in your place of work. A connection between ones personal sense of achievement and worthiness with similar experiences in the home, school/work, and community. Opportunities for leadership and management roles. Need Strength: Need Satisfaction: Freedom: The need for autonomy, independence and limited restriction in the work environment and at home. Opportunities for spontaneity and change in all areas of ones life. Need Strength: Need Satisfaction: Fun and Enjoyment: The need for balance between work and pleasure. Sufficient opportunities for enjoyable and fun experiences within the context of work, home and community. Need Strength: Need Satisfaction: Survival and Health: Safe physical environment in the workplace and at home. An environment that is a supportive context for ones mental and emotional health. Family income that adequately provides for enhanced educational opportunities, personal self-care, leisure activities, and vacations. Need Strength: Need Satisfaction:

24 Student Needs Survival & Health Love & Belonging PowerFreedom Fun & Enjoyment

25 Student Needs

26 Thoughts on Glasser?

27 Critical Friend Students should be allowed to acquire in-depth information about topics they consider useful or interesting. Student Choice vs. School Expectations teachers must teach what is in the curriculum Do not grade their work because grades suggest to students that the work is finished. If we do not grade student work, what do we show to administration, parents, etc.

28 Critical Friend Allow students to come up with rules. Ron Morrish Rule making should be the teachers job, and the teacher should be able to explain to students why the rules exist and what they are intended to accomplish. What happens when rules are broken? (consequences)

29 Critical Friend What about special needs students? How do these students fit in Glassers Choice Theory and Quality Education? William Glasser makes no mention of students who have special needs Choice Theory seems to be designed for older students What about elementary students?

30 References Charles, C.M. Building Classroom Discipline. 10th. Toronto, ON: Pearson, 2011, Erwin, J.C. (2003). Giving student what they need. Educational Leadership, 61, Glasser, W. (1998). Choice theory: a new psychology of personal freedom. New York: Harper Perennial. Glasser, W. (1988). Choice theory in the classroom. New York: Harper Perennial. Glasser, W. (1997). Choice theory and students success. Education Digest, 63(3), Glasser, W. (1997). A new look at school failure and school success. Phi Delta Kappan, 78(8), Palmatier, L. (1998). Crisis counseling for a quality school community: applying william glasser's choice theory. USA: Taylor and Francis. Wubbolding, R.E. (2007). Glasser quality school. Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice, 11(4),


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