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Sexual Violence Education In accordance with Article XX-G of the Public School Code, Sexual Violence Education at Institutions of Higher Education.

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Presentation on theme: "Sexual Violence Education In accordance with Article XX-G of the Public School Code, Sexual Violence Education at Institutions of Higher Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sexual Violence Education In accordance with Article XX-G of the Public School Code, Sexual Violence Education at Institutions of Higher Education

2 Sexual Violence Education and Awareness This PowerPoint provides the following: Definition of sexual violence. Discussion of contributing factors to sexual violence. Information relating to risk education and personal protection. Information on where and how to get assistance, the importance of medical treatment and evidence collection, and how to report sexual violence to campus authorities and local law enforcement. The possibility of pregnancy and transmission of sexual diseases. Biblical Seminarys Harassment Officers A promise of discretion and dignity. A promise of confidentiality for victims of sexual assault.

3 Sexual Violence: Definitions Sexual violence is any sexual act that is perpetrated against someone's will. Sexual violence encompasses a range of offenses, including: – a completed nonconsensual sex act (i.e., rape) – an attempted nonconsensual sex act – abusive sexual contact (i.e., unwanted touching) – non-contact sexual abuse (e.g., threatened sexual violence, exhibitionism, verbal sexual harassment).

4 Biblical Seminary is committed to a staff, faculty, and student environment free from sexual violence. Examples of conduct that could constitute sexual assault or sexual violence: Biblical Seminarys Harassment Policy and Procedures specifies that sexual assault or violence occurs when there are physical sexual acts perpetrated against the will of a student or employee when that student or employee is incapable of giving consent. Acts of rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion all constitute sexual violence.

5 Definitions of Rape and Sexual Assault According to Pennsylvania law, rape is a first-degree felony and is defined as sexual intercourse obtained: through "forcible compulsion or threat of forcible compulsion when a person is unconscious or is unaware that intercourse is occurring even though conscious when a mental disability renders a person incapable of consent when a person is less than 13 years of age even though consent is given when the offender gets the victim drunk or high for the purpose of preventing resistance without the knowledge of the victim

6 Non-Contact Sexual Abuse Non-contact sexual abuse does not include physical contact of a sexual nature between the perpetrator and the victim. It includes acts such as: voyeurism intentional exposure of an individual to exhibitionism unwanted exposure to pornography verbal or behavioral sexual harassment threats of sexual violence to accomplish some other end taking nude photographs of a sexual nature of another person without his or her consent or knowledge, or of a person who is unable to consent or refuse.

7 Providing Victim Assistance and Support, part 1 Remember to explain that the victim of sexual assault is not at fault: Assist the victim with getting to a safe place as soon as possible. Encourage the victim to preserve all physical evidence. Offer to contact the police on the victims behalf. The victim should not bathe, shower, douche (for female victims), use the toilet, or change clothing until a medical exam has been conducted. Encourage and help the victim to contact the police or offer to contact the police on the victims behalf. The emergency telephone number 911 is used in the local community. Notify your supervisor or course professor about the incident. Because victims often share with someone they trust, any staff member, regardless of training or comfort level, can be the first person a victim talks with. It is important for you to let your supervisor know that you have received information about a sexual assault or rape, so you can receive support, so the victim can be provided with whatever resources the victim might need, and so Biblical Seminary can ensure that campus safety matters have been addressed. In reporting to your supervisor or professor, you do not need to divulge the victims identity. The supervisor or professor will report the incident to one of the campus Sexual Harassment Officers: Director of MA in Counseling or VP for Student Advancement.

8 Providing Victim Assistance and Support, part 2 Offer to assist the victim to get medical attention as soon as possible. An exam will determine the presence of physical injury, sexually transmissible diseases, or pregnancy (for female victims); it is important for the victims well-being. The exam, if done within 72 hours following the rape or sexual assault, can obtain evidence to assist in criminal prosecution. Contact a close friend who can be with the victim for support. The friend can accompany the victim to the medical exam and/or police department. Encourage the victim to meet with a counselor. The victim may be feeling a variety of strong emotions: fear, anxiety, depression, guilt, powerlessness, shame, shock, disbelief, embarrassment, denial, anger. The victim may also have some physical problems, such as sleep disturbances and nausea. Therefore, seeing a counselor may be important.

9 Sexual Violence: Risk and Protective Factors Risk factors are associated with a greater likelihood of sexual violence (SV) perpetration. They are contributing factors and may or may not be direct causes. Not everyone who is identified as "at risk" becomes a perpetrator of violence. Individual and relationship factors for perpetration Community and societal factors for perpetration

10 Risk Factors for Perpetration: Individual and Relationship Factors Risk factors are associated with a greater likelihood of sexual violence (SV) perpetration. They are contributing factors and may or may not be direct causes. Not everyone who is identified as "at risk" becomes a perpetrator of violence. Individual Risk Factors Alcohol and drug use Coercive sexual fantasies Impulsive and antisocial tendencies Preference for impersonal sex Hostility towards women Hyper masculinity Childhood history of sexual and physical abuse Witnessed family violence as a child Relationship Factors Association with sexually aggressive and delinquent peers Family environment characterized by physical violence and few resources Strong patriarchal relationship or familial environment Emotionally unsupportive familial environment

11 Risk Factors for Perpetration: Community and Societal Factors Additional risk factors: Community Factors Lack of employment opportunities Lack of institutional support from police and judicial system General tolerance of sexual violence within the community Weak community sanctions against sexual violence perpetrators Societal Factors Poverty Societal norms that support sexual violence Societal norms that support male superiority and sexual entitlement Societal norms that maintain women's inferiority and sexual submissiveness Weak laws and policies related to gender equity High tolerance levels of crime and other forms of violence

12 Sexual Violence: Physical and Psychological Consequences Sexual violence can have harmful and lasting consequences for victims, families, and communities. The following list describes some of them. Physical Transmission of sexual diseases More than 32,000 pregnancies result from rape every year (Holmes et al., 1996) Some long-term consequences include chronic pelvic pain, migraines and other frequent headaches Victims of sexual violence face both immediate and chronic psychological consequences (Felitti, et. al., 1998; Yuan, Koss, Stone: 2006). Psychological Immediate psychological consequences include shock, denial, fear, confusion, anxiety, guilt, distrust of others. Chronic psychological consequences include depression, alienation, post traumatic stress disorder symptoms

13 Sexual Violence: Social and Behavioral Consequences Sexual violence also has social impacts on its victims, such as (Clements at al., 2004; Golding, Wilsnack, Cooper, 2002) Social Strained relationships with the victim's family, friends, and intimate partners Less emotional support from friends and family Less frequent contact with friends and relatives Lower likelihood of marriage Some researchers view the following health behaviors as both consequences of sexual violence and factors that increase a person's vulnerability to being victimized again in the future (Brener et al., 1999; Lang et al., 2003). Health Behaviors Engaging in high-risk sexual behavior including unprotected sex and multiple sex partners Using harmful substances (smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, taking drugs) Unhealthy diet-related behaviors (fasting, vomiting, overeating)

14 Resources Biblical Seminary has available counseling to staff, faculty, students and their families. Counseling Center at Biblical Seminary Harassment officers for Biblical Seminary: o Director of the Counseling Program Phil Monroe; o VP for Student Advancement Pamela Smith Non-seminary resource: WOAR (Women Organized Against Rape) 24-hour crisis line: Government resource:


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