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No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended.

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Presentation on theme: "No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended."— Presentation transcript:

1 No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education. Association on Higher Education & Disability (AHEAD) July 15th, 2010 Presenter: Judy L. Shanley, Ph.D. US Department of Education Office of Postsecondary Education Enhancing Access to Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

2 July 15, Reauthorized the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (enacted August 14 th, 2008) The HEOA: Includes provisions on universal design for learning, professional development, and students with intellectual disabilities Extends OPEs programs that promote access to higher education for all students with disabilities (Title VII, Part D) Permits participation of students with intellectual disabilities in Federal Student Aid programs (Title IV) No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

3 July 15, Title VII – discretionary grants – Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) TPSID A Coordinating Center B Title IV – financial aid – Federal Student Aid (FSA) No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

4 July 15, HEOA allows an eligible student with an intellectual disability attending an eligible comprehensive transition and postsecondary program (CTPP) to receive: Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant, and Federal Work-Study programs funds Implementing regulations developed through negotiated rulemaking process Title IV Programs – Financial Aid No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

5 July 15, Student has to be eligible to receive financial aid Apply for title IV eligibility with their FAFSA Student has to be an eligible student with an ID Program must be an approved CTP Program Apply to update their program through their E-app Internal review by FSA External review by professionals with expertise in CTP – offer recommendations 4-6 week process; institutions can reapply if they are not initially approved No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

6 July 15, Defined in section 760 of the HEOA (with slight modifications) Must: Be offered by a participating Title IV IHE Be designed to support students with intellectual disabilities (ID) Include an advising and curriculum structure Require students with ID to participate in courses and activities with students without disabilities Comprehensive Transition and Postsecondary Program (CTP) No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

7 July 15, For students to get title IV aid, school must update its E-App at Using these Steps: Application must include: Detailed description of the program Satisfactory academic progress policy Length/number of credit hours in the program Educational credential/identified outcomes for all students in program Evidence that institution has notified its accrediting agency of the program No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

8 July 15, Defined in section 760 of the HEOA (with slight modifications) A student: With mental retardation or significant cognitive impairment AND Who is/was eligible for FAPE under IDEA Private/home-schooled students Institution ultimately determines if student meets the definition No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

9 July 15, An eligible student: Must be enrolled in an approved CTP Must meet all of the general student eligibility requirements under section EXCEPT: Does NOT have to be enrolled for the purpose of obtaining a degree or certificate Is NOT required to have a high school diploma or have passed an ability-to-benefit test Must maintain satisfactory academic progress under schools policy for students in the CTP Documentation must demonstrate that student has an intellectual disability No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

10 July 15, J. Shanley, US Dept. of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, CONNECTIONS ACROSS PART D PROGRAMS TO PROVIDE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES WITH A HIGH QUALITY EDUCATION Existing and future program with appropriation Future program with no current appropriation Future program with appropriation - - Depicts formal and informal mechanisms across programs to develop and share knowledge National Center (no appropriations to date) Repository of Strategies and Supports for students with all disabilities, including ID Obtain knowledge from Model Demos. Obtain knowledge from TPSID grantees. Obtain knowledge from accessible materials. Provide TA regarding all disabilities Model demonstrations (84.333A) (current) contribute knowledge and data regarding strategies and supports to enhance the ability of higher ed faculty and staff to instruct all students with disabilities TPSID (84.407A) (start on 10/01) Grantees contribute knowledge and data about program components to support students with ID through evaluating models Coordinating Center (84.407B) (start on 10/01) Develop standards Support and provide TA to TPSID grantees Develop evaluate protocols. Evaluate programs Develop communication mechanisms across programs that consider knowledge contributions of all programs Provide support for developing student credentials upon completion of programs Accessible Materials Program (no appropriations to date) contribute knowledge and data about accessibility of instructional materials for all students Commission Primary Relationship Support to other comprehensive transition & postsecondary programs

11 July 15, Model Demonstrations (84.407A) Expect to fund model demonstrations $500,000 annually Five-year performance period Program to start 10/01/2010 Coordinating Center (84.407B) Expect to fund one Coordinating Center $330,000 annually Five-year performance period Program to start 10/01/2010 index.html index.html No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

12 July 15, Serves students with intellectual disabilities Provides individual supports and services Provides a focus on academic enrichment, socialization, independent living skills, including self-advocacy, and integrated work experiences and career skills that lead to gainful employment Integrates person-centered planning Participates with the coordinating center Engages in regular meetings or conference calls Partners with local educational agencies to support students under the IDEA Plans for the sustainability of the model program Creates and offers a meaningful credential Project Reach Convocation, U of Iowa, May /-1/COMM07/Students-learn-magic-of-I-can-not-I- can-t /-1/COMM07/Students-learn-magic-of-I-can-not-I- can-t No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

13 July 15, Program Characteristics Implementation of dual enrollment programs (although dually enrolled students are not eligible for Title IV) Collaboration between secondary transition professionals and disability service providers Partnerships between IHEs, community organizations, & vocational rehabilitation agencies Participation of parents and families Opportunities for student housing No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

14 July 15,

15 July 15, As with any major reform effort, change often happens slower than those fighting for that change would like, but, with continued effort and relentless optimism a new vision of higher education is emerging where all, even those who have been traditionally excluded from halls of academia, have a right to belong, succeed, and learn. Causton-Theoharis, Ashby, & DeClouette. (2009). Relentless optimism: Inclusive postsecondary opportunities for students with significant disabilities. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 22(2), No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

16 Students with Disabilities in Postsecondary Education: A Profile of Preparation, Participation, and Outcomes (June 1999). (6% of college students reported having a disability – however, survey did not collect data regarding whether student had a developmental or intellectual disability).http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid= Postsecondary Education Research Center (PERC), Transition to College. Wealth of resources regarding dual enrollment and evaluation. Condition of Education (2009).Indicator 10 – undergraduate enrollment – did not collect data regarding disability status of college enrollees (http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2009/pdf/10_2009.pdf).http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2009/pdf/10_2009.pdf Thinkcollege.net Transition Services for Students with Significant Disabilities in College and Community Settings Article in US News students-with-intellectual-disabilities.html?PageNr=2http://www.usnews.com/articles/education/2009/02/13/college-is-possible-for- students-with-intellectual-disabilities.html?PageNr=2 REACH (Realizing Educational and Career Hopes) (http://news.cofc.edu/2010/02/college-launches- realizing-educational-and-career-hopes-program/ program at the College of Charleston realizing-educational-and-career-hopes-program/ Lewis & Clark Community College Program Vanderbilt Program University of Iowa Reach (Realizing Educational and Career Hopes) Program -- Select Resources No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise referred to in this presentation is intended or should be inferred. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education.

17 July 15, Judy L. Shanley, Ph.D. Voice (business hours) – Voic –


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