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Quality Education Commission Presentation to the Education Subcommittee on Education Innovation January 16, 2007 Speaking to you today… Susan MasseyCommission.

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Presentation on theme: "Quality Education Commission Presentation to the Education Subcommittee on Education Innovation January 16, 2007 Speaking to you today… Susan MasseyCommission."— Presentation transcript:

1 Quality Education Commission Presentation to the Education Subcommittee on Education Innovation January 16, 2007 Speaking to you today… Susan MasseyCommission Chair Pat BurkODE Chief Policy Officer

2 Oregons education goals Oregons education goals …the best educated citizens in the nation and the world. Access to a Quality Education must be provided for all of Oregons youth… ORS Access to a Quality Education must be provided for all of Oregons youth… ORS Quality Education Goals Quality Education Goals ORS ORS Academic excellenceAcademic excellence Rigorous academic standardsRigorous academic standards Applied learningApplied learning Lifelong academic skillsLifelong academic skills Quality Education Commission

3 What is the Quality Education Model? The model was developed by the Legislative Council on the Quality Education Model in The model was developed by the Legislative Council on the Quality Education Model in The QEM identifies 23 research-based school characteristics that contribute to increasing student achievement. It targets 90% student attainment. The QEM identifies 23 research-based school characteristics that contribute to increasing student achievement. It targets 90% student attainment. Uses statewide common definitions of these factors in district financial reporting. (Data Base Initiative) Uses statewide common definitions of these factors in district financial reporting. (Data Base Initiative) Quality Education Commission

4 What is the Quality Education Model? Data are updated every two years by QEC. Data are updated every two years by QEC. Calculates a per-student cost of these factors in 3 prototype school models, i.e. elementary, middle and high school. Calculates a per-student cost of these factors in 3 prototype school models, i.e. elementary, middle and high school. Uses this information to project statewide costs of the model. Uses this information to project statewide costs of the model. Provides analytical tool for looking at school costs. Provides analytical tool for looking at school costs. Quality Education Commission

5 12 Quality Indicators Schools Schools Leadership Leadership Parental/community involvement Parental/community involvement Organizational Adaptability Organizational Adaptability Safe and orderly learning environment Safe and orderly learning environment District policies to support learning. District policies to support learning. Teachers Teachers Teacher/teaching quality Teacher/teaching quality Professional Development Program Professional Development Program Teacher efficacy Teacher efficacy Quality Education Commission

6 12 Quality Indicators (cont) Classrooms Classrooms Effective instructional programs and methods Effective instructional programs and methods School database collection and analysis to improve instruction School database collection and analysis to improve instruction Students Students Readiness to learn Readiness to learn Connectedness to school and engagement in academics and extra curricular programs. Connectedness to school and engagement in academics and extra curricular programs. Quality Education Commission

7 Components of the Model Creates 3 prototypical school models that contain elements that would make it possible for 90% of students to reach state standards. Data are drawn from Oregon schools. Creates 3 prototypical school models that contain elements that would make it possible for 90% of students to reach state standards. Data are drawn from Oregon schools. Prototypes are based on assumptions about what these schools would look like, i.e., demographics, technology, staff quality, school size, professional growth of staff. Prototypes are based on assumptions about what these schools would look like, i.e., demographics, technology, staff quality, school size, professional growth of staff. Quality Education Commission

8 Components of the Model Each Prototype has: Each Prototype has: Adequate Staffing Adequate Staffing Added instructional time and activities for students not meeting standard Added instructional time and activities for students not meeting standard Curriculum development and technology support Curriculum development and technology support On-site instructional improvement On-site instructional improvement Professional development for teachers and administrators Professional development for teachers and administrators Adequate classroom supplies Adequate classroom supplies Adequate funds for building maintenance Adequate funds for building maintenance A per-pupil calculation is applied to projected state enrollment A per-pupil calculation is applied to projected state enrollment Quality Education Commission

9 The Prototypes Elementary340 students Elementary340 students All-day Kindergarten All-day Kindergarten Class size average of 20 in primary grades Class size average of 20 in primary grades Class size of 24 in grades 4-5 Class size of 24 in grades FTE for specialists in areas such as art, music, PE, reading, math, TAG, Library, ESL, Child Development/Counselor 4.5 FTE for specialists in areas such as art, music, PE, reading, math, TAG, Library, ESL, Child Development/Counselor Quality Education Commission

10 The Prototypes Middle School500 Students Middle School500 Students Class size average of 25 Class size average of additional teachers for math, English, science 1.5 additional teachers for math, English, science Alternative programs for special needs and at- risk students Alternative programs for special needs and at- risk students Volunteer coordinator and community outreach worker Volunteer coordinator and community outreach worker One counselor for every 250 students One counselor for every 250 students Adequate campus security Adequate campus security Quality Education Commission

11 The Prototypes High School1,000 students High School1,000 students Class size average of 24 Class size average of additional teachers for math, English, science 3.0 additional teachers for math, English, science Alternative programs for special needs and at- risk students Alternative programs for special needs and at- risk students Volunteer coordinator and communtiy outreach worker Volunteer coordinator and communtiy outreach worker One counselor for every 250 students One counselor for every 250 students Adequate campus security Adequate campus security School-to-work coordinator School-to-work coordinator Quality Education Commission

12 The Prototypes Extended day and/or year Extended day and/or year Specialized staff for library, PE, Music, Special education services, English as a Second Language Specialized staff for library, PE, Music, Special education services, English as a Second Language Support staff, clerical and instructional aides Support staff, clerical and instructional aides Professional development for staff Professional development for staff Adequate computers per student Adequate computers per student Textbooks/supplies Textbooks/supplies Quality Education Commission

13 The Prototypes Operations/maintenance Operations/maintenance Transportation Transportation Central special education support Central special education support Technology services Technology services District administrative support District administrative support Quality Education Commission

14 Essential Budget Level ($ millions) Full Funding of the QEM ($ millions) Difference Percent Difference Biennium Total District Funding $8,969.6$10,873.7$1, % Plus: ESD Expenditures $791.4$ % Plus: High-Cost Disabilities Fund $24.0$80.0$ % Equals: Total Funding Requirement $9,784.9$11,745.0$1, % Less: Revenue not in Formula $280.1$ % Less: Federal Revenue to School Districts and ESDs $901.4$ % Equals: Total Formula Funding Requirement $8,603.4$10,563.5$1, % Less: Property Taxes and Local Resources $2,797.3$2, % Equals: State School Fund Requirement $5,806.1$7,766.2$1, % Quality Education Commission The Gap: $1.96 billion

15 What is the Quality Education Commission? The QEC was established by Executive Order EO on November 5, 1999, by Governor Kitzhaber and Superintendent Bunn. The QEC was established by Executive Order EO on November 5, 1999, by Governor Kitzhaber and Superintendent Bunn. Ballot Measure 1, approved by voters in November, 2000, stated that the amount of money needed to meet the QEM goals be appropriated or the legislature must issue a report on the reasons for the deficiency. Ballot Measure 1, approved by voters in November, 2000, stated that the amount of money needed to meet the QEM goals be appropriated or the legislature must issue a report on the reasons for the deficiency. Quality Education Commission

16 What is the Quality Education Commission? The charge to the QEC was modified and placed in statute by the Oregon Legislature in the 2001 session. (ORS and ORS ) The charge to the QEC was modified and placed in statute by the Oregon Legislature in the 2001 session. (ORS and ORS ) The Commission is comprised of 11 members appointed by the Governor and is staffed by ODE. The Commission is comprised of 11 members appointed by the Governor and is staffed by ODE. Issues a report to the Governor and to the Legislature every two years. Issues a report to the Governor and to the Legislature every two years. Quality Education Commission

17 Who are the Commissioners? Susan Massey, Chair, Retired Member State Board of Education Susan Massey, Chair, Retired Member State Board of Education Vic Backlund, Salem, Retired Legislator Vic Backlund, Salem, Retired Legislator Yvonne Curtis, Eugene 4J, Director of Student Achievement Yvonne Curtis, Eugene 4J, Director of Student Achievement Ed Jensen, Wallowa, Region 18 ESD Superintendent Ed Jensen, Wallowa, Region 18 ESD Superintendent Lynn Lundquist, Prineville, President, Oregon Business Association Lynn Lundquist, Prineville, President, Oregon Business Association Frank McNamara, Portland, Willamette View, Inc., President/CEO (retired) Frank McNamara, Portland, Willamette View, Inc., President/CEO (retired) Peggy Penland, Medford, Oregon School Boards Association Peggy Penland, Medford, Oregon School Boards Association Deborah Peterson, Portland, High School Principal Deborah Peterson, Portland, High School Principal Lolenzo Poe, Multnomah County, Advisor to the Chair, Board of Commissioners Lolenzo Poe, Multnomah County, Advisor to the Chair, Board of Commissioners Keith Thomson, Beaverton, Vice President (retired), Intel, Inc. Keith Thomson, Beaverton, Vice President (retired), Intel, Inc. Duncan Wyse, Portland President, Oregon Business Council Duncan Wyse, Portland President, Oregon Business Council Larry Wolf, Tigard, President, Oregon Education Association Larry Wolf, Tigard, President, Oregon Education Association Quality Education Commission

18 Charge to the Commission (ORS ) Determine the amount of funding sufficient to ensure that the States system of K-12 public education meets the quality goals established in statute. ORS and ORS Determine the amount of funding sufficient to ensure that the States system of K-12 public education meets the quality goals established in statute. ORS and ORS Identify best practices in education that will lead to high student performance and the cost of implementing those best practices in K-12 schools. Identify best practices in education that will lead to high student performance and the cost of implementing those best practices in K-12 schools. Quality Education Commission

19 Charge to the Commission (ORS ) Issue a report to the Governor and Legislature Current K-12 practices Current K-12 practices Costs of continuing those practices Costs of continuing those practices Expected student performance Expected student performance Best practices for meeting the goals Best practices for meeting the goals Costs of those practices Costs of those practices Expected student performance using those practices Expected student performance using those practices Two alternatives for meeting the quality goals. Two alternatives for meeting the quality goals. Quality Education Commission

20 The Role of the Commission The Role of the Commission Help policymakers understand the relationship between funding and student achievementHelp policymakers understand the relationship between funding and student achievement Identify key policy issues related to accountability, efficiency, and adequacyIdentify key policy issues related to accountability, efficiency, and adequacy Enhance our understanding of Oregons education system as a whole: Pre-K to 20Enhance our understanding of Oregons education system as a whole: Pre-K to 20 Estimate the funding requirements of policy proposalsEstimate the funding requirements of policy proposals Help determine what it will take to meet the requirements of No Child Left BehindHelp determine what it will take to meet the requirements of No Child Left Behind Quality Education Commission

21 The Commissions Focus Accountability and Governance Accountability and Governance Efficiency Efficiency Adequacy Adequacy

22 Commission Goals in 2006 Provide timely and relevant data that is useful to the legislature and the public. Provide timely and relevant data that is useful to the legislature and the public. Explore the relationship between funding and student performance. Explore the relationship between funding and student performance. Provide effective, clear and helpful communication. Provide effective, clear and helpful communication. Quality Education Commission

23 Whats New? Enhanced Analysis Production Function Analysis: Does level of expenditure impact student achievement? Production Function Analysis: Does level of expenditure impact student achievement? Detailed Analysis of Spending by Object and Function across comparable states. Detailed Analysis of Spending by Object and Function across comparable states. Quality Education Commission

24 Production Function Analysis Increasing expenditures on instruction appears to be statistically related to increasing student achievement while controlling for the effects of other variables, such as, limited English proficiency, poverty, and special education categories. Increasing expenditures on instruction appears to be statistically related to increasing student achievement while controlling for the effects of other variables, such as, limited English proficiency, poverty, and special education categories. Additional expenditure is not sufficient, especially in middle and high school. Additional resources must be accompanied by effective instructional strategies. Additional expenditure is not sufficient, especially in middle and high school. Additional resources must be accompanied by effective instructional strategies. Quality Education Commission

25 Spending Analysis Growth in per-pupil expenditures declined beginning in Growth in per-pupil expenditures declined beginning in Oregons K-12 spending as a percentage of personal income dropped below the national average beginning in Oregons K-12 spending as a percentage of personal income dropped below the national average beginning in Oregons salary per staff FTE and total compensation per staff FTE are ranked 18 th and 12 th in the nation respectively. Oregons salary per staff FTE and total compensation per staff FTE are ranked 18 th and 12 th in the nation respectively. Oregons per student spending is $566 below the national average. Oregons per student spending is $566 below the national average. Oregon spends more than average on student transportation and less on non-instructional areas, such as, maintenance and capital expenditures. Oregon spends more than average on student transportation and less on non-instructional areas, such as, maintenance and capital expenditures. Quality Education Commission

26 Communication Initiative The Commission has provided high quality, independent data and analysis related to costs and outcomes. The Commission has provided high quality, independent data and analysis related to costs and outcomes. The Commission needs to improve how it shares this information and adds value to public dialog. The Commission needs to improve how it shares this information and adds value to public dialog. A new goal of the Commission is to enhance the publics understanding of the education system in Oregon. A new goal of the Commission is to enhance the publics understanding of the education system in Oregon. Quality Education Commission

27 Commission Findings Student progress in reaching the benchmark standards has slowed in most grades. Student progress in reaching the benchmark standards has slowed in most grades. Per-student funding in Oregon has dropped below the national average. Per-student funding in Oregon has dropped below the national average. Special student populations, particularly special education students and students with limited English proficiency are increasing faster than the general students population. These special populations require greater resources to meet the states academic standards. Special student populations, particularly special education students and students with limited English proficiency are increasing faster than the general students population. These special populations require greater resources to meet the states academic standards. Quality Education Commission

28 Commission Findings Class sizes continue to rise. Class sizes continue to rise. Course offerings outside of the subject-areas tested on the states standardized tests have diminished, resulting in a narrowing curriculum in many schools. Course offerings outside of the subject-areas tested on the states standardized tests have diminished, resulting in a narrowing curriculum in many schools. Oregons Pre-kindergarten, K-12 and post secondary sectors are not well aligned in either their curricular or their resource use. Oregons Pre-kindergarten, K-12 and post secondary sectors are not well aligned in either their curricular or their resource use. Quality Education Commission

29 Commission Recommendations Provide adequate and stable funding for Oregons schools. Provide adequate and stable funding for Oregons schools. Continue achievement gains by targeting additional resources to the areas where added resources have the greatest impact. Continue achievement gains by targeting additional resources to the areas where added resources have the greatest impact. Early Childhood Development Programs Early Childhood Development Programs Early Reading Initiatives Early Reading Initiatives High School Restructuring High School Restructuring Conduct more research into best practices and effective resource utilization. Conduct more research into best practices and effective resource utilization. Quality Education Commission

30 Commission Recommendations Continue efforts to build integrated data systems to foster alignment and coordination among all three education sectors. Continue efforts to build integrated data systems to foster alignment and coordination among all three education sectors. Continue efforts to improve the governance and accountability structures that promote more effective use of resources across all three sectors of Oregons educational system. Continue efforts to improve the governance and accountability structures that promote more effective use of resources across all three sectors of Oregons educational system. Develop capacity to evaluate educations role in improving Oregons economy and lowering social service costs. Develop capacity to evaluate educations role in improving Oregons economy and lowering social service costs. Quality Education Commission

31 Alternative 1: Alternative 1: Phase in the provision over a 10-year period. Phase in the provision over a 10-year period. Allow districts time to build capacity Allow districts time to build capacity Spread out additional investment over time Spread out additional investment over time Alternative 2: Alternative 2: Establish partial, most promising goals Establish partial, most promising goals Reading in the early grades and sustained into middle grades Reading in the early grades and sustained into middle grades Teacher and administrator professional development Teacher and administrator professional development High school strategies that emphasize rigorous, personalized learning for all students High school strategies that emphasize rigorous, personalized learning for all students ALTERNATIVE RECOMMENDATIONS

32 Questions and Discussion Visit our website at Quality Education Commission


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