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Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 State Compensatory Education Changes to the Program 2009-2010.

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1 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 State Compensatory Education Changes to the Program

2 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Copyright and Terms of Service Copyright © Texas Education Agency, The materials found on this website are copyrighted © and trademarked as the property of the Texas Education Agency and may not be reproduced without the express written permission of the Texas Education Agency, except under the following conditions: 1.Texas public school districts, charter schools, and Education Service Centers may reproduce and use copies of the Materials and Related Materials for the districts and schools educational use without obtaining permission from the Texas Education Agency; 2.Residents of the state of Texas may reproduce and use copies of the Materials and Related Materials for individual personal use only without obtaining written permission of the Texas Education Agency; 3.Any portion reproduced must be reproduced in its entirety and remain unedited, unaltered and unchanged in any way; 4.No monetary charge can be made for the reproduced materials or any document containing them; however, a reasonable charge to cover only the cost of reproduction and distribution may be charged. Private entities or persons located in Texas that are not Texas public school districts or Texas charter schools or any entity, whether public or private, educational or non-educational, located outside the state of Texas MUST obtain written approval from the Texas Education Agency and will be required to enter into a license agreement that may involve the payment of a licensing fee or a royalty fee. Contact TEA Copyrights with any questions you may have.TEA Copyrights 2

3 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 In 2009, the 81 st Legislature made a few (2) changes to the SCE program. The 2 specific changes are to: Indirect cost Student identification Details noted on the next 4 slides 3

4 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Indirect Cost ( slide includes anticipated change to indirect cost - effective Fall Approval from State Board of Education is pending ) Indirect Cost (slide includes anticipated change to indirect cost - effective Fall Approval from State Board of Education is pending) Indirect costs include expenditures reported under the following expenditure function codes: Student Transportation; General Administration; Facilities Acquisition and Construction; and the Function 90 Function 90 series of the General Fund, as defined in the TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide (FASRG). 55 must be spent on the districts identified students at risk of dropping out of school The remaining 55 percent of the SCE allotment must be spent on the districts identified students at risk of dropping out of school. Refer to the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 105. Foundation School Program, Subchapter B - Use of State Funds and Module 9, Section for direct instruction 4

5 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Chapter 105. Foundation School Program Subchapter B. Use of State Funds § Maximum Allowable Indirect Cost. Indirect costs may be attributed to the following expenditure function codes: 34--Student Transportation; 41-- General Administration; 81--Facilities Acquisition and Construction; and the Function 90 series of the general fund, as defined in the Texas Education Agency publication [bulletin], Financial Accountability System Resource Guide No more than 45% [15%] of each school district's Foundation School Program (FSP) special allotments under the Texas Education Code, Chapter 42, Subchapter C, may be expended for indirect costs related to the compensatory education program. No more than 35% of each school district's FSP special allotments under the Texas Education Code, Chapter 42, Subchapter C, may be expended for indirect costs related to the following programs: [compensatory education,] gifted and talented education, bilingual education [and special language programs], career and technical education, and special education. [No more than 10% of each district's FSP special allotments may be expended for indirect costs related to career and technology education programs.] Indirect costs may be attributed to the following expenditure function codes: 34--Student Transportation; 41-- General Administration; 81--Facilities Acquisition and Construction; and the Function 90 series of the general fund, as defined in the Texas Education Agency publication [bulletin], Financial Accountability System Resource Guide. Text of Proposed Amendment to 19 TAC 5

6 Copyright © Texas Education Agency percent and Carry Over 55* Carry over amounts result when expenditures attributable to the FSP SCE program during a fiscal year are less than 55* percent of the FSP SCE allotment for the school year. Carry over amounts are to be budgeted in the first or second subsequent fiscal year. In calculating the carry over amount, the lower of either the preliminary or final earned allotment amount reflected in the districts summary of finances is compared to the districts expenditure amount for the respective school/fiscal year. _____________________________________________________________________________________ slide includes anticipated change to indirect cost - effective Fall Approval from State Board of Education is pending * slide includes anticipated change to indirect cost - effective Fall Approval from State Board of Education is pending 6

7 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Page 51 7

8 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 At-Risk Student Eligibility Criteria Includes each student who is under 21 years of age who: 1.Is in prekindergarten, kindergarten or grade 1, 2, or 3 and did not perform satisfactorily on a readiness test or assessment instrument administered during the current school year; NOTE: Do not use previous years score for classification. Change effective the school year only as the result of the request of the students parents. this is NOT retroactive Change effective the school year : adds a provision to § that changes the compensatory education definition of student at risk of dropping out of school by excluding a student who did not advance from PK or kindergarten to the next grade level only as the result of the request of the students parents. this is NOT retroactive TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide, version 13 (Adopted June 2008) Module 9, Section TEC, Sections and (a)(1) 8

9 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 At-Risk Student Eligibility Criteria Includes each student who is under 21 years of age who: in grade 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12did not maintain an average equivalent to 70 in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum 2.Is in grade 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12, and did not maintain an average equivalent to 70 on a scale of 100 in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum during a semester in the preceding or current school year or is not maintaining such an average in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum in the current semester; TEC, Sections and (a)(1) TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide - Module 9, Section

10 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 At-Risk Student Eligibility Criteria Includes each student who is under 21 years of age who: not advanced from one grade level to the next 3.Was not advanced from one grade level to the next for one or more school years. NOTE: Student remains at risk of dropping out of school for the remainder of his/her public school education. 4.Did not perform satisfactorily on an assessment instrument 110 percent 4.Did not perform satisfactorily on an assessment instrument administered to the student under Subchapter B, Chapter 39, and who has not in the previous or current school year subsequently performed on that instrument or another appropriate instrument at a level equal to at least 110 percent of the level of satisfactory performance on that instrument; TEC, Sections and (a)(1) TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide - Module 9, Section

11 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 At-Risk Student Eligibility Criteria Includes each student who is under 21 years of age who: pregnantparent 5.is pregnant or is a parent; 6.has been placed in an alternative education program in accordance with Section has been placed in an alternative education program in accordance with Section during the preceding or current school year; NOTE: Section describes a disciplinary education program not an in-school suspension (ISS) program or a JJAEP. (Use Function Code 95 [indirect cost] to account for JJAEP expenditures.) 7.has been expelled in accordance with Section has been expelled in accordance with Section , TEC during the preceding or current school year; TEC, Sections and (a)(1) TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide - Module 9, Section

12 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 At-Risk Student Eligibility Criteria Includes each student who is under 21 years of age who: currently on parole, probation, deferred prosecution 8.Is currently on parole, probation, deferred prosecution, or other conditional release; previously reported through PEIMS to have dropped out of school 9.Is was previously reported through PEIMS to have dropped out of school; NOTE: Student remains at risk of dropping out of school for the remainder of his/her public school education. TEC, Sections and (a)(1) TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide - Module 9, Section

13 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 At-Risk Student Eligibility Criteria Includes each student who is under 21 years of age who: limited English proficiency 10.Is a student of limited English proficiency, as defined by Section ; Note: The student no longer meets at risk status for this criteria once the student has been exited from this program. or care of the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services been referred to the department 11.Is in the custody or care of the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services or has, during the current school year, been referred to the department by a school official, officer of the juvenile court, or law enforcement official; Now - Department of Family and Protective Services TEC, Sections and (a)(1) TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide - Module 9, Section

14 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 At-Risk Student Eligibility Criteria Includes each student who is under 21 years of age who: homeless 12.Is homeless, as defined by 42 U.S.C. Sec , and its subsequent amendments; Refer to: McKinney- Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 2001, Sec For more information: The Texas Homeless Education Office offers free technical assistance service to any district that needs help in developing and/or implementing its Homeless Education Plan. Call or to speak with a consultant. Also, review and maintain information located in Appendix 17 in the NCLB Federal Application for Federal Funds. TEC, Sections and (a)(1) TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide - Module 9, Section

15 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 At-Risk Student Eligibility Criteria Includes each student who is under 21 years of age who: 13.Resided in the preceding school year or resides in the current school year in a residential placement facility in the district 13.Resided in the preceding school year or resides in the current school year in a residential placement facility in the district, including a detention facility, substance abuse treatment facility, emergency shelter, psychiatric hospital, halfway house, or foster group home. NOTE: Student cannot be counted by two districts during the same time period. TEC, Sections and (a)(1) TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide - Module 9, Section

16 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 school district may serve students who meet local eligibility criteria may not exceed 10 percent of the number of students who received services A school district may serve students who meet local eligibility criteria if the local criteria was adopted by the board of trustees. However, the number of students receiving services may not exceed 10 percent of the number of students who received services during the preceding school year. school district may not use its SCE allotment to provide the specified supplemental services or supplemental instruction to students identified as at risk pursuant to local criteria on a campus that did not have any students identified as at risk pursuant to Section (d). Keep in mind, the school district may not use its SCE allotment to provide the specified supplemental services or supplemental instruction to students identified as at risk pursuant to local criteria on a campus that did not have any students identified as at risk pursuant to Section (d). Local Student Eligibility TEC Section (d) Continued on next slide 16

17 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 school district MUST document the need for the specific supplemental services or supplemental instruction in its comprehensive needs assessment As with all other aspects of a compensatory education program, the school district MUST document the need for the specific supplemental services or supplemental instruction in its comprehensive needs assessment. Maintain information in the comprehensive needs assessment and the D/CIP Maintain information in the comprehensive needs assessment and the D/CIP. Students at risk of dropping out of school reported not reported through the PEIMS Students at risk of dropping out of school reported through the PEIMS must meet the criteria set forth in Section (d); students identified using local criteria are not reported through the PEIMS. Once a need has been identified, the school district may provide the specified supplemental services or supplemental instruction to students identified at risk of dropping out of school pursuant to local criteria. Local Student Eligibility, continued TEC Section (d) 17

18 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Module 9 is being updated! It will be available in a few weeks. Module 9 is being updated! It will be available in a few weeks. The audit risk assessment updated Plan information requirements emphasized Specific (mandated in TEC) information required $149,999 SCE requirement will be raised to $500,000 Mentoring clarified Student identification form updated Relevance of evaluation of program emphasized Audit information will now include the Full-time Equivalent Staff and Financial Resources report; located in Appendix 2 Full-time Equivalent Staff and Financial Resources 18

19 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 So What Hasnt Changed? Illiteracy rates remain high in the state and nation Intent and purpose of the program Program intent codes Required policies and procedures Use of SCE funds Student identification Supplement not supplant updated and current as regulated in state law, TEC Sections, Maintenance of updated and current district and campus improvement plans as regulated in state law, TEC Sections, Submission of plans Evaluation of the program Maintenance of appropriate documentation 19

20 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Cost of Illiteracy Remains High a lack of basic reading and language skills Illiteracy: A Hidden Health HazardAs if confusing labels and the high cost of many prescription drugs weren't enough to deter patients from taking their medication as directed, health professionals are starting to realize there's another barrier: a lack of basic reading and language skills. lived an average of nine years less than graduates A study reported in the Archives of Internal Medicine, concluded that education levels have long appeared to play a role in longevity: the study found that people who did not graduate from high school lived an average of nine years less than graduates. 20

21 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Cost of Illiteracy Remains High, continued According to the Literacy Report, released by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Literacy statistics and juvenile court 85 percent of all juveniles who interface with the juvenile court system are functionally illiterate. More than 60 percent of all prison inmates are functionally illiterate. More than 60 percent of all prison inmates are functionally illiterate. Penal institution records show that inmates have a 16% chance of returning to prison if they receive literacy help, as opposed to 70% who receive no help. This equates to taxpayer costs of $25,000 per year per inmate and nearly double that amount for juvenile offenders. Penal institution records show that inmates have a 16% chance of returning to prison if they receive literacy help, as opposed to 70% who receive no help. This equates to taxpayer costs of $25,000 per year per inmate and nearly double that amount for juvenile offenders. Illiteracy and crime are closely related. The Department of Justice states, "The link between academic failure and delinquency, violence, and crime is welded to reading failure." Over 70% of inmates in America's prisons cannot read above a fourth grade level. Illiteracy and crime are closely related. The Department of Justice states, "The link between academic failure and delinquency, violence, and crime is welded to reading failure." Over 70% of inmates in America's prisons cannot read above a fourth grade level. Many of the USA ills are directly related to illiteracy. Just a few statistics: Literacy is learned. Illiteracy is passed along by parents who cannot read or write. Many of the USA ills are directly related to illiteracy. Just a few statistics: Literacy is learned. Illiteracy is passed along by parents who cannot read or write. 21

22 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Intent and Purpose of SCE designed to supplement the regular education program (Refer to Section (a) of the Texas Education Code) State Compensatory Education (SCE) is defined in law as programs and/or services designed to supplement the regular education program for students identified as at risk of dropping out of school. (Refer to Section (a) of the Texas Education Code) goalreducedisparity in performance on assessment instruments Chapter 39 TEC dropping out of school The goal of SCE is to reduce any disparity in performance on assessment instruments administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39 TEC, or disparity in the rates of high school completion between students at risk of dropping out of school and all other LEA students. purposeincrease the academic achievement and reduce the drop out rate The purpose is to increase the academic achievement and reduce the drop out rate of these students. 22

23 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 When using SCE funds to upgrade a Title I, schoolwide program: must be part of the campus budget SCE funds are used to support the Title I, Part A schoolwide (SW) educational program must be part of the campus budget. maintains documentation that all programs and strategies are supported by scientifically based research The district/charter maintains documentation that all programs and strategies are supported by scientifically based research. Flexibilityonly for campuses at 40 percent low-income Flexibility – only for campuses at 40 percent low-income -- The flexibility does not apply to SW campuses that use the Title I, Part A feeder pattern to meet the 40 percent poverty threshold or the Title I, Part A regulation which allows a campus that has operated as a SW campus the previous year with a 40 percent poverty threshold to continue to operate as a SW campus. In addition, this flexibility does not apply to Title I, Part A SW campuses that are SW because of an Ed-Flex Waiver. Refer to Module 9, Section for additional guidance 23

24 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 When using SCE funds to upgrade a Title I, schoolwide program, continued: Program Intent Code (PIC) 30 Program Intent Code (PIC) 30 – used only for SW campuses at 40 percent using SCE funds to upgrade schoolwide program expenditures must be tracked back to the SCE PIC SCE expenditures must be tracked back to the SCE PIC, and all generally accepted accounting principles must be followed. Planfollows State and Federal guidelines Campus Improvement Plan – follows State and Federal guidelines and indicates the coordination of SCE funds activities funded through the central office DO NOT have schoolwide flexibility NOTE: Title I, Part A, districtwide program activities funded through the central office DO NOT have schoolwide flexibility, regardless of whether all campuses in a district are Title I, Part A schoolwide. 24

25 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 educational program Although activities conducted with SCE funds may be used to support the Title I educational program, the campus must continue to receive its fair share of state and local funds for conducting the regular education program, and the intent and purpose of the SCE Program must still be met. be described and evaluated The use of these funds will be described and evaluated in the schoolwide campus improvement plan. but they must be identified as at risk for reporting to PEIMS Students at risk of dropping out of school under the state at-risk criteria do not need to be identified for services on a Title I, Part A schoolwide campus, but they must be identified as at risk for reporting to PEIMS. Address how the needs of at-risk students are being met Address how the needs of at-risk students are being met. District is responsible for evaluating the SCE program District is responsible for evaluating the SCE program at the district level according to the requirements of Section (c), TEC. 25 When using SCE funds to upgrade a Title I, schoolwide program, continued:

26 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Support of a Title I, Part A Program Whats the easiest way for a campus improvement plan to indicate that SCE funds are being used to upgrade the Title I, Part A schoolwide program? amount of SCE dollars being used on the campus to upgrade the Title I, Part A schoowide educational program Indicate the amount of SCE dollars being used on the campus to upgrade the Title I, Part A schoowide educational program. effective Indicate effective strategies being implemented to meet the needs of the at risk students. howprogram is implemented Indicate how the SCE program is implemented to benefit all students in need. must Schoolwide plans must describe how other local, state and federal resources will be used in conjunction with Title I funds. 26

27 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 For additional information regarding Title I, Part A, view the following: NCLB Program Coordination USDE The USDE at also provides valuable information regarding the Title I program.http://www.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/index.html Designing Schoolwide Programs Designing Schoolwide Programs at 27

28 Copyright © Texas Education Agency NOTICE: the law states the SCE funds must be used to supplement the regular education program for at risk students, not the school budget. SCE is not a CASH COW, it is a program! Only effective strategies, programs and activities are supported by the SCE allotment. Any program activity, program personnel, or program materials required by federal law, state law or State Board of Education rule may not be funded with SCE funds. SCE funds MUST be used to provide support programs and/or services that supplement the regular education program so that students at risk of dropping out of school can succeed in school.

29 Copyright © Texas Education Agency compensatory, intensive, or accelerated instructional services (a)Each school district shall use the student performance data resulting from the basic skills assessment instruments and achievement tests administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39, to design and implement appropriate compensatory, intensive, or accelerated instructional services for students in the district's schools that enable the students to be performing at grade level at the conclusion of the next regular school term. shall provide accelerated instruction to a student at risk of dropping out of school. (b)Each district shall provide accelerated instruction to a student enrolled in the district who has taken the secondary exit-level assessment instrument and has not performed satisfactorily on each section or who is at risk of dropping out of school. shall evaluate and document the effectiveness of the accelerated instruction (c)Each school district shall evaluate and document the effectiveness of the accelerated instruction in reducing any disparity in performance on assessment instruments administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39, or disparity in the rates of high school completion between students at risk of dropping out of school and all other district students. §29.081(a), TEC Compensatory, Intensive, and Accelerated Instruction SCE is a State Mandated Program

30 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 WAIVER REQUIRED!!! Program Intent Codes – Accelerated Education 26 AEP Basic Services 26 – Nondisciplinary Alternative Education Programs – AEP Basic Services 28 DAEP Basic Services 28 – Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs DAEP Basic Services 29 DAEP Supplemental SCE Costs 29 – Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs DAEP Supplemental SCE Costs 30Title I Schoolwide Activities 40% 30 – Title I Schoolwide Activities Related to SCE & Other Costs on Campuses with 40% or More Low- Income Poverty Percentage Ensureall the attending students are identified at-risk using either state or local criteria Ensure all the attending students are identified at-risk using either state or local criteria. Module 9, Section

31 31 Required Policies and Procedures requiredwritten policies & procedures Districts, including charter schools receiving SCE funding, are required to have written policies & procedures to identify: students who are at risk students who are at risk of dropping out of school; at riskunder localcriteria10% cap students who are at risk of dropping out of school under local criteria & documentation of compliance with the 10% cap; entered how students are entered into the SCE program; exited how students are exited from the SCE program calculation of 110% satisfactory performance on the cost of the regular education program the methodologies involving calculation of 110% satisfactory performance on all assessment instruments; and the cost of the regular education program in relation to budget allocations per student and/or instructional staff per student ratio. Module 9, Section 9.2.3

32 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Maintenance of At Risk Identification Records Student At-Risk Identification Profile This two page document is located in the Module 9, in Appendix 2 – Sample Forms. must use current The LEA must use current maintain student records verifying the at-risk classification. must indicate periodic review and verification The at-risk classification records must indicate periodic review and verification. The district decides where records will be maintained. 32

33 Copyright © Texas Education Agency What does basic program mean? What does supplement the basic program mean? teacher, textbooks, and instructional materials All students have the right to receive an education paid for with unrestricted funds. This includes a teacher, textbooks, and instructional materials. support and supplement the basic instructional program SCE funds are to be used to support and supplement the basic instructional program for students at risk of dropping out of school. cannot must have SCE funds cannot be used to pay for services and materials that students must have as a part of their basic educational program.

34 Copyright © Texas Education Agency The candles represent even further additional support for the student The candles represent even further additional support for the student. Basic and Supplemental Programs Example: The candles represent even further additional support for the student The candles represent even further additional support for the student. Your basic program would represent the plain cake; every student is entitled to a regular education, in this case, an equal sized piece of cake. Regular or Basic Program Supplemental Program Supplemental Program Plus

35 Copyright © Texas Education Agency Planning Requirement SCE program must be described in the campus improvement plan or described in the district improvement plan if the state compensatory education program is implemented districtwide The SCE program must be described in the campus improvement plan if the program is implemented at the campus level or be described in the district improvement plan if the state compensatory education program is implemented districtwide. Plan – to devise or project the realization or achievement; to have the end in mind Plans are only good intentions unless they immediately degenerate into hard work. Peter F. Drucker – American Educator and Writer Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?" "That depends a good deal on where you want to get to," said the Cat. "I don't much care where –" said Alice. "Then it doesn't matter which way you go," said the Cat.

36 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 A Well Written Plan: specific, measurable, attainable, time-boundmost importantlyfocused on increasing achievement for all students in the school The plan includes objectives that are specific, measurable, attainable, time-bound and, most importantly, focused on increasing achievement for all students in the school. Examines the SCE Program evaluation By analyzing what is working and what is not working to improve student achievement, LEAs can focus resources on the strategies and goals that will most likely impact student achievement. Without written goals and specific objectives, the staff members often direct their individual efforts toward slightly different goals, thereby reducing the efficiency of the overall program. However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results. Winston Churchill 36

37 Copyright © Texas Education Agency District Improvement Plan, (DIP) evised §11.251, TEC Each school district shall have a DIP that is developed, evaluated, and revised annually, in accordance with district policy, by the superintendent with the assistance of the district-level committee established under §11.251, TEC. guide districtand campus staff in the improvement ofstudent performance for all studentgroups in order to attain state standards The purpose of the DIP is to guide district and campus staff in the improvement of student performance for all student groups in order to attain state standards in respect to the academic excellence indicators adopted under §39.051, TEC. Module 9, Section 9.2.3

38 Copyright © Texas Education Agency Campus Improvement Plan, (CIP) Law requires the D/CIP Law requires the D/CIP ; it is the primary record supporting expenditures attributed to the SCE program. SCE program must be described in the CIPcampus specific activities. SCE program must be described in the CIP to reflect campus specific activities. The DIP reflects the summary of the total SCE program for the entire district. § – , TEC Module 9, Section SCE is a state mandated program SCE is a state mandated program.

39 Copyright © Texas Education Agency District/Campus Improvement Plans ( slide includes anticipated change to indirect cost - effective Fall Approval from State Board of Education is pending ) District/Campus Improvement Plans (slide includes anticipated change to indirect cost - effective Fall Approval from State Board of Education is pending) must The district/campus improvement plan must include the following: Total amount of SCE funds allocated for resources & staff Actual dollar amounts for activities and SCE dollars that show 55% of the entitlement Cumulative summary of program and entire budget in the DIP Specific campus activities and campus budget in the CIPs §11.253, TEC

40 Copyright © Texas Education Agency District/Campus Improvement Plans ( slide includes anticipated change to indirect cost - effective Fall Approval from State Board of Education is pending ) District/Campus Improvement Plans (slide includes anticipated change to indirect cost - effective Fall Approval from State Board of Education is pending) The district/campus improvement plan must include the following: Total amount of SCE funds allocated for resources & staff Actual dollar amounts for activities and SCE dollars that show 55% of the entitlement Cumulative summary of program and entire budget in the DIP Specific campus activities and campus budget in the CIPs §11.253, TEC must be related to performance or productivity data. Financial information must be related to performance or productivity data. should answer questions regarding the achievements students and the campus Budgets and D/CIPs should answer questions regarding the achievements of both the students and the campus. must be related to performance or productivity data. Financial information must be related to performance or productivity data. should answer questions regarding the achievements students and the campus Budgets and D/CIPs should answer questions regarding the achievements of both the students and the campus. What bang did the campus get for the buck? What bang did the campus get for the buck?

41 Copyright © Texas Education Agency A written summary of data usually included in the front of the plan. The summary of data includes an analysis of patterns and trends with a discussion of probable causes of high areas of student needs. May use data from the following sources: Current state assessments, readiness tests Current state assessments, readiness tests High school completion rates High school completion rates Pass/failure rates Pass/failure rates Data from special program evaluations Data from special program evaluations PLANS MUST INCLUDE: Comprehensive Needs Assessment Driving Force Behind District/Campus Planning § – , TEC Module 9, Section 9.2.5

42 Copyright © Texas Education Agency Comprehensive needs assessment - conducted to identify the strengths and weaknesses of existing programs, practices, procedures, and activities, and ensures the use of resources is carefully planned, supplemental and cost effective. The summary should also include the following: expected and actual indicators of expected and actual outcomes for students in special programs that are typically exempt from measures used in the academic excellence indicators, and predicted needs predicted needs based on projected enrollment, demographic trends, legislative impact, and state and community political and economic events. PLANS MUST INCLUDE: Comprehensive Needs Assessment Driving Force Behind District/Campus Planning § – , TEC Module 9, Section 9.2.5

43 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) helps planners focus better on campus issues Conducting a needs assessment helps planners focus better on campus issues and link goals with hard data. centerpiece of the planning A CNA should be the centerpiece of the planning processthe database from which the planning team develops its vision of the future. school identifies its strengths and weaknesses specifies priorities for improving student achievement Through the CNA, a school identifies its strengths and weaknesses and specifies priorities for improving student achievement and meeting challenging academic standards. comprehensive evaluation plan The concept of the CNA is to build on the schools strengths and improve areas of weakness A needs assessment is a comprehensive evaluation plan of a schools strengths and weaknesses. The concept of the CNA is to build on the schools strengths and improve areas of weakness. A comprehensive needs assessment is not a simple check list where the someone (or a group) checks off probable strategies or programs that sound like they might work at a district and/or campus. §11.252(a), TEC 43

44 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Components of Campus Improvement Plan IDENTIFIED STRATEGIES SUPPLEMENTAL FINANCIAL RESOURCES SUPPLEMENTAL FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTEs)* MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES TIMELINES FOR MONITORING STRATEGIES FORMATIVE EVALUATION SUMMATIVE EVALUATION A strategy is a plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal. Planned methods or techniques for facilitating and enhancing learning Strategies are aligned with the comprehensive needs assessment. The activities/ strategies should be specific. The activities/ strategies should be evaluated (formatively) at increments during the school year. Note: August May is not an increment The formative evaluation and the time increments should be specified as well as indicating who will be responsible for monitoring the activity. Indicate the actual dollar amounts for activities and/or strategies. FTEs must be shown for SCE activities involving personnel at both the district and campus level. Measurable student performance objectivesbased on the needs assessment data. Measurable student performance objectives based on the needs assessment data. stated in terms of what the student or learner will do, rather than what the campus or instructor will do Objectives stated in terms of what the student or learner will do, rather than what the campus or instructor will do. demonstrate understand comprehend improve Measurable goals do not contain words that can't be measured such as demonstrate, understand, comprehend, improve, etc. How will you know if a child understands? Has improved? Comprehends? You will measure it by observing a behavior, thus the behavior should be stated in the goal. More information regarding measurable goals is on the next slide. Schedule for data collection during the school year Timelines should indicate when progress toward the objective will be monitored. This should be written in incremental units such as every three weeks, every month, (not August though May or ongoing) each semester, etc. Effective strategies are key. Used to control, assure or improve the quality of performance or delivery Includes periodic measures that are utilized during the actual implementation of the interventions or strategies. Example: Collecting continuous feedback from participants in a program in order to revise the program as needed – concerned with program improvement Examples: weekly check of lesson plans, weekly and/or six weeks evaluation of student projects and/or subject grades, regular inspection of attendance records, examination of semester passing rates, etc. Summative evaluations provide overall effects & program accountability These measures summarize the cumulative results for the year; is a method of judging the worth of a program at the end of the program activities. Analysis of the outcome is conducted – concerned with the final judgment of success. Examples: summaries of annual performance reports, summaries of parent surveys, summaries of staff development evaluations, pass/failure rates, attendance/drop summary reports, etc. §§ – , TEC Module 9, Section

45 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Identified Strategies Measurable Goals By establishing measurable goals, a campus clearly articulates the purposes and intended outcomes of its improvement plan. In addition, the goals provide a means of tracking the campus progress over the school year of the plan. goals are broad statements objectivesare easily measurable Course goals are broad statements indicating what the student will learn. Course objectives are easily measurable and often include specific skills that the student can demonstrate. 1. Students will learn conversational Spanish. 2. Students will write four sentences in Spanish. 3. Students will use fifty vocabulary words in a conversation with another student. 4. Students will learn Spanish grammar. 45

46 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 So whats the difference between formative and summative evaluation? purpose of formative evaluation is to validate or ensure that the goals of the instruction are being achieved and to improve the instruction The purpose of formative evaluation is to validate or ensure that the goals of the instruction are being achieved and to improve the instruction, if necessary, by means of identification and subsequent remediation of problematic aspects. Weston, Mc Alpine, and Bordonaro, (1995) conducted to provide program staff evaluative information useful in improving the program Formative evaluation is conducted to provide program staff evaluative information useful in improving the program. Worthen, Sanders, and Fitzpatrick, (1997) "When the cook tastes the soup, thats formative; when the guests taste the soup, thats summative." Robert Stakes ; it helps you know whether the product teaches what it is supposed to teach Summative evaluation is typically quantitative, using numeric scores or letter grades to assess learner achievement; it helps you know whether the product teaches what it is supposed to teach. 46

47 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Did your CIP address what helped the students learn? Answer should lie in the plan. D/CIPs are required by TEC, Section D/CIPs important fiscal documents because they: Identify needs and objectives Describe strategies and activities Place expenditures in context Successful schools don't just happen – they must be continually shaped and guided. Are your plans a true reflection of your district, campus, teacher, parent, and community expectations? 47

48 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Ensure your D/CIPs address the following: The school documents, in the plan, how it conducted the needs assessment, the results it obtained, and the conclusions it drew from those results. Goals are connected to priority needs, the needs assessment, and portray a clear and detailed analysis of multiple types of data. The goals sufficiently address the needs of the at-risk student population. Strategies are described in sufficient detail and are focused on helping at-risk students reach the states standards. Strategies are described in sufficient detail and are focused on helping at-risk students reach the states standards. The plan sufficiently addresses how the school will determine if these needs are met. 48

49 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Plan Submission – When????? last Friday of the month of July The district improvement plan, campus improvement plan(s) (for school districts) or instructional plan (for charter schools) and the local evaluations (for both school districts and charter schools) are to be submitted not later than the 150th day after the last day permissible to send data for the PEIMS data FINAL Midyear resubmission 2. The 150 th day falls late February; the due date for the submission for plans and evaluations will thus fall late July. The agency will therefore accept plans through the last Friday of the month of July. Submit your plans by the last Friday of July 2010 Submit your plans by the last Friday of July

50 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Submission of Plans in PDF only! File naming and submission instructions are outlined in the Electronic Reports Submission Standards which can be found on the Financial Audits web page: The PDF formatted plans should be uploaded using a TEA Secure Environment (TEASE) Audit account. No TEASE Audit Access – apply for it online by following the instructions at the following link: Contact Paul Moreno for additional guidance at Instructions for uploading the files can be found in the Electronic Report Submission Standards at the following link: 50 TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide Module 9, Section and 9.4

51 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Program Evaluation is Required In an era where resources for educational programs are limited, programs that can document their success in having an impact on their students and in using resources efficiently and effectively will be at an advantage for ongoing funding. How do we know if the SCE program is: Making progress and Achieving results 51

52 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 SCE Program Evaluation The SCE Program Evaluation is NOT A list of TAKS results stapled to the front of the plan; or A survey without analysis of results. The evaluation should be a thorough assessment of the districts actual supplemental program or programs implemented for at-risk students. Evaluation provides formative feedback that helps guide a program as it is being implemented. It also provides summative data that clearly demonstrates that the program is accomplishing its stated goals and objectives. 52

53 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Evaluation and Monitoring critical component The evaluation and monitoring improvement efforts are a critical component of the LEA comprehensive needs assessment. Inferences about the effectiveness of strategies and interventions can only be accurately made if it has been determined with a reasonable degree of certainty that strategies have been implemented as designed. SCE resources must be redirected SCE resources must be redirected when evaluations indicate that programs and/or services are unsuccessful in producing desired results for students at risk of dropping out of school. TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide, Module 9, Section

54 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 SCE Program Evaluation The programs evaluation measures how successful the school has been in addressing identified needs, and meeting the goals of the plan. The SCE program must be evaluated and documented by showing the effectiveness in reducing any disparity in The SCE program must be evaluated and documented by showing the effectiveness in reducing any disparity in: Performance on assessment instruments between students at risk of dropping out of school and all other district students; and Rates of high school completion between students at risk of dropping out of school and all other district students. Also, evaluate the effectiveness of the designated SCE program and include the results of this evaluation in the DIP. TEC, Section and TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide, Module 9, Section

55 Copyright © Texas Education Agency SCE Program Evaluation Be able to describe how implementation of the at-risk (at both district and campus level) program will be evaluated and adjusted as needed. Be able to ensure that an annual evaluation of progress toward reaching the district/campus goals takes place. Be able to describe how implementation of the at-risk (at both district and campus level) program will be evaluated and adjusted as needed. Be able to ensure that an annual evaluation of progress toward reaching the district/campus goals takes place.

56 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Example Independent School District Are TAKS Scores Analyzed for Every Test in Your District? GradeTest Subject Tests District At Risk State At Risk Difference 3 rd Reading85%80%5% over State 3 rd Math70%72% 2% below State 4 th Reading74%68%6% above State 4 th Writing85%83%2% above State 4 th Math61%71% 10% below State 5 th Reading66%63%4% above State 5 th Math58%69% 9% below State 5 th Science50%56% 10% below State 56

57 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 GradeTest Subject Tests District At Risk State At Risk Difference 3 rd Reading85%80%5% over State 3 rd Math70%72% 2% below State 4 th Reading74%68%6% above State 4 th Writing85%83%2% above State 4 th Math61%71% 10% below State 5 th Reading66%63%4% above State 5 th Math58%69% 9% below State 5 th Science50%56% 10% below State Example Independent School District Are TAKS Scores Analyzed for Every Test in Your District? 57 Without effective evaluation, the program staff may fail to document important impacts the program has on its participants. Program staff may also fail to recognize how different components in the program are affecting the student success. The evaluation helps focus staff efforts and project resources on the specific goals of the program. Without effective evaluation, the program staff may fail to document important impacts the program has on its participants. Program staff may also fail to recognize how different components in the program are affecting the student success. The evaluation helps focus staff efforts and project resources on the specific goals of the program. Where are the concerns?

58 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 GradeTAKS Subject Tests Gain 3 rd Reading85%89%+4 3 rd Math70% 0 4 th Reading74%80%+6 4 th Writing85%88%+3 4 th Math61%62%+1 5 th Reading66%72%+6 5 th Math58% 0 5 th Science50% 0 Where are the concerns for the campus? Have gains or losses been analyzed? Campus State Compensatory At Risk Student Performance for ABC Elementary School 58

59 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 GradeTAKS Subject Test 2007State Compensatory Education Budget 3 rd Reading85%$ 9,000 3 rd Math70%$36,000 4 th Reading74%$ 4,000 4 th Writing85%$ 9,000 4 th Math61%$45,000 5 th Reading70%$10,000 5 th Math58%$47,000 5 th Science50%$30,000 Campus State Compensatory Education Budget and At Risk Student Performance for ABC Elementary School Based on the analysis of test results and recommendations made by the planning committee, where would SCE funds be focused? 59

60 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Would your SCE evaluation be able to answer the following? doing what it is intended to do How well is the SCE program doing what it is intended to do? costing What is it costing to achieve the SCE programs purpose? effective and efficient Do independent evaluations show that the SCE strategies are effective and efficient? Is there information demonstrating the ability of the program to use resources (e.g., time, effort, money) effectively? Is there information demonstrating the ability of the program to use resources (e.g., time, effort, money) effectively? By analyzing what is working and what is not working to improve student achievement, LEAs can focus resources on the strategies and goals that will most likely impact student achievement. 60

61 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Districts Should be Able to Provide the Following Information, continued: Name and description of each major State Compensatory Education program provided. For each of the programs/services provided: Where Where each program/service is offered; funding amount each Current funding amount for each program/service; students served Number of students served and/or staff members involved; topics Professional staff development (topics) relevant to the SCE program; Coordination Coordination with other programs and funding sources; supplement Description indicating how the SCE program or service supplement the regular education program; Section (c) and (q), TEC how the SCE program or service reduced the dropout rate and/or increases the achievement of students identified as being at risk of dropping out of school Description indicating how the SCE program or service reduced the dropout rate and/or increases the achievement of students identified as being at risk of dropping out of school; Description indicating how evaluations were conducted to measure the impact of the SCE program on student performance; Sections11.252(a)(8) and (d)(7), TEC; Description indicating how evaluations were conducted to measure the impact of the SCE program on student performance; Sections11.252(a)(8) and (d)(7), TEC; Results of the effectiveness Results of the effectiveness of the listed SCE program as measured through evaluations and supporting data (results of evaluation); Section (c), TEC 61 Maintain this information for your planning committee, program staff, parents, and your auditors.

62 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 BUT WAIT! Dont forget the importance of Buy-In Before the district invests in any program it must have buy-in. Why? Analysts and educators have all noted that one of the most important ways to achieve the benefits of a well-designed program is to make sure that those who will use it--teachers and other school staff--are fully committed to the program before its implementation. Many districts have learned--often the hard way--that even the most effective programs can fail to raise student achievement if poorly implemented. Why? Because one of the most important elements for achieving this "well-founded confidence" in a program is to make sure that school staff have played a substantial role in its selection and implementation. 62

63 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Staff Development staff development designed to assist students at risk of dropping out of school. School districts MUST be able to demonstrate that school personnel have received staff development designed to assist students at risk of dropping out of school. Effective programs rely on adequate and pertinent staff development. MUST Training and training expense must be reasonable and necessary and training MUST be related and beneficial to the at-risk program. Documentation must be maintained that training was evaluated for effectiveness Ensure that training is not a one time event. Documentation must be maintained that training was evaluated for effectiveness. established thoroughly written policies regarding attendance of staff development Ensure your district has established thoroughly written policies regarding attendance of staff development. TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide, version 13 (Adopted June 2008) Module 9, Section

64 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Keep in Mind: Only effective strategies, programs and activities are supported by the SCE allotment. may not Any program activity, program personnel, or program materials required by federal law, state law or State Board of Education rule may not be funded with SCE funds. MUST SCE funds MUST be used to provide support programs and/or services that supplement the regular education program so that students at risk of dropping out of school can succeed in school. NOTICE: the law states the SCE funds must be used to supplement the regular education program, not the school budget NOTICE: the law states the SCE funds must be used to supplement the regular education program, not the school budget. 64

65 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 May SCE funds be used to fund or supplement the following? The services must be part of delivery of academic instruction supplemental to the regular program and be reflected in the comprehensive needs assessment. No. The services must be part of delivery of academic instruction supplemental to the regular program and be reflected in the comprehensive needs assessment. In contrast, programs such after school tutoring for students at risk of dropping out of school would qualify. NOTE: all costs MUST be reasonable and necessary. Banquets, ceremonies, celebrations, door prizes, proms, pep rallies or food? Drug dogs, drug testing, drug treatment, red ribbons, PA systems, security mirrors, cameras or defibrillators? Furniture, door mats, murals, banners, display cases, clinic/nurse supplies, rock climbing walls, bike racks, or custom or outdoor signs? Library equipment, library supplies or yearly campus library budget? Entertainment, recreation, social events or proms? Gifts, promotional items, memorabilia, or souvenirs (such as T-shirts, caps, tote bags, key chains, imprinted pens)? Athletics, PE teachers, PE aides, PE or gym equipment, sport uniforms or megaphones? Supplemental positions or duties not associated to intensive instruction of the foundation curriculum? Student handbooks, year books, school newspaper or campus marquee? Trips to amusement parks, swimming pools or theater? UIL, music, cheerleading or athletic events? Day Care? School Nurses or supplies for the clinic? Additional counselors or principals? The 55% 65

66 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Unallowable Costs? Field trips Professional development Flat screens for all principals and administrators Smart boards Door prizes Animals, feeding of or breeding of drug dogs Duplicating paper Filing Cabinets, Furniture Audio visual equipment for school board room School marquee Electrical rewiring of building Athletic expenses Meals Trophies and Plaques All State Choir or Band costs Prom Dresses, Prom lock-ins Hall Passes, Student IDs Washers and Dryers Break room furniture and equipment Walkie Talkies, PA systems Monitoring the districts attendance rate Trophies/plaques used for student of the month, A/B honor roll, A honor roll and all end of year events Water coolers, Ice Machines Indoor/Outdoor Paint Moonwalks, Clowns, Parade Floats Defibrillators, Drug Testing or Treatment Lawn equipment, landscaping, pest control Allowance of personnels children in LEAs PK programs Roller skates, skate boards, bicycles Special dietary expenses for special education students Floral arrangements, aquariums Staff development for administrative staffs certification requirements Costs associated to Play Off games Cultural Events Fish Fry for Community Clothing vouchers lacking paper trail Coffee and pastries for teachers lounge Religious Event-speakers Updating Local Policy and Attendance Code Maintenance of computer hardware for the district Laminating machines How can the following expenditures be used to help at-risk students pass the state assessment? Does the LEA maintain documentation? 66

67 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Lack of supporting documentation in the D/CIPs 67 Just because its listed in the plan (or on a schoolwide program) does not necessarily make the activity allowable! Always consider the following questions Always consider the following questions. reasonable and necessary Is the program, activity, or strategy reasonable and necessary to carry out the intent and purpose of the program? address a need previously identified in the campus comprehensive needs assessment Does the program, activity, or strategy address a need previously identified in the campus comprehensive needs assessment? Was the program, activity, or strategy to be funded, described in the D/CIPs or charter improvement plan before the decision of whether to pay the expenditure from SCE funds? Was the program, activity, or strategy to be funded, described in the D/CIPs or charter improvement plan before the decision of whether to pay the expenditure from SCE funds? evaluated How will the program, activity, or strategy be evaluated to measure a positive impact on student achievement? Will the program, activity, or strategy raise academic standards for the intended beneficiaries? Will the program, activity, or strategy raise academic standards for the intended beneficiaries? supplemental Is the program, activity, or strategy supplemental to other nonfederal programs or federal programs?

68 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Consider the following scenario: $7,000 – includes installation merry-go-round Campus X wants to use SCE funds ($7,000 – includes installation) to purchase a merry-go-round for their summer program for at risk students. The principal and teachers believe that this purchase will raise student attendance and student moral. reasonable and necessary Is this purchase reasonable and necessary to carry out the intent and purpose of the SCE program? merry-go-roundaddress a need a previously identified in the campus needs assessment Does the merry-go-round address a need a previously identified in the campus needs assessment? merry-go-round before Was the use of the merry-go-round, described in the D/CIPs or charter improvement plan before the decision of whether to pay the expenditure from SCE funds? merry-go-roundevaluated student achievement How will the use of the merry-go-round, be evaluated to measure a positive impact on student achievement? merry-go-roundraise academic standards Will the purchase of the merry-go-round raise academic standards for the at risk students? merry-go-roundsupplemental Is the purchase of the merry-go-round supplemental to the basic instructional program? 68

69 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Does the campus maintain auditable documentation to ensure a positive response to each of the previous questions? Is the information clearly reflected and addressed in the district and campus improvement plans? Does the campus maintain auditable documentation to ensure a positive response to each of the previous questions? Is the information clearly reflected and addressed in the district and campus improvement plans? 69

70 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 When faced with the question of whether a certain position, program or activity may possibly be funded with SCE dollars, keep the following in mind: purpose to improve student performance through direct instructional services The purpose of the SCE program is to improve student performance through direct instructional services to students at risk of dropping out of school. The more removed services are from the student, the more the resources are diluted and the more difficult it becomes for the school district to defend the use of the SCE funds and justify the effectiveness of the program in improving student performance. prohibited from using FSP SCE resource allocations to supplant resource allocations for the regular education program LEAs are prohibited from using FSP SCE resource allocations for students at risk of dropping out of school to supplant resource allocations for the regular education program. 70

71 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Common Audit Findings 55 percent Lack of documentation verifying that 55 percent of the districts SCE allotment was earmarked for the SCE program Incorrect Coding At-risk students incorrectly identified No evaluation No evaluation of the SCE program Lack of supporting documentation in the district/campus plans Incorrect use of the 55 percent portion of SCE funds Funding state mandated rules Funding state mandated rules, programs or positions (this is unallowable) not used to meet intent and purpose of SCE program Funds not used to meet intent and purpose of SCE program Expenditures not related to supplementing the basic educational program SCE funds used for questionable travel expenses and/or field trips SCE funds used for entertainment costs, door prizes, banquets, trophies, meals, athletics, UIL, and school board expenses NOT related to direct instruction SCE funds used for positions that are NOT related to direct instruction unsupported high dollar equipment or basic supplies SCE funds used for unsupported high dollar equipment or basic supplies Purchase orders lacking important documentation No indication of an AT-RISK program 71

72 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 A Florida school's spending questioned By Christopher Curry Staff writerChristopher Curry Published: Friday, January 30, 2009 at 6:01 a.m. Last Modified: Thursday, January 29, 2009 at 11:12 p.m. Debit card purchases at Victoria's Secret and Lovely Nails and credit card charges, including $200 for a dinner at Dragonfly Sushi & Sake, have school district officials investigating a "number of irregularities" in the finances of Gainesville charter school Hoggetowne Middle School. FRIDAY, MAY 16, 2008 TEARING AT THE INADEQUATE SPENDING PIE IN NEW JERSEY Calls for Accountability, Not Posturing, on School Spending Ohio auditor questions $3.7M in spending By Associated Press POSTED: 04:35 p.m. EDT, Oct 13, 2009 The questioned spending involves federal funds that lacked proper documentation, violated federal law or were determined to be unreasonable. Chippewa Valley School Spending under Review Sunday, February 1, 2009 By Mitch Hotts, Macomb Daily Staff Writer Complaints from a pair of self-described watchdogs have resulted in a state review of spending by Chippewa Valley Schools, including a $600,000 purchase of land along with gift baskets sent to employees and catered meals. Thursday, October 22, 2009 New York's School Spending Is Questioned Administrators within the central board's bureaucracy wonder why the seven board members, serving in part-time posts, need to have private cars, some chauffeured, at public expense. Four of the members have equipped their cars with cellular telephones. 72

73 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Ensure that positions funded with SCE : provide direct instruction/services to at-risk students associated with the foundation curriculum not the basic fund allotment are supplemental to the basic instructional program; not the basic fund allotment and are indentified in the D/CIP and meet a need indentified in the comprehensive needs assessment. If your schools expenses were made public, would the public understand and agree with the budget? Would some expenses appear questionable? Does the district/charter school maintain sufficient documentation (a paper trail) to justify ALL expenses? Does your district have supporting documentation to ensure program dollars were spent efficiently and effectively? Always remember the NEWSPAPER Test! 73

74 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Additional WEB Links Summary of Finances – Financial Accountability System Resource Guide Version 13.0– NCLB Program Coordination - Texas Education Code – Texas Homeless Education Office – TEA – Regional Education Service Centers (ESCs) – Chapter 37 Discipline - Law and Order - Q and A on SCE - Dropout Prevention Site - A complete list of dropout prevention and recovery programs and strategies is located on the Texas Education Agencys Web site at: 74

75 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Additional SCE Questions SCE Program, student identification and the 110 percent calculation – consult with your ESC At-Risk contact D/CIPs – contact your ESC SCE contact SCE audits – contact Alma Obregon in the Division of Financial Audits at D/CIPs submission – contact Paul Moreno in the Division of Financial Audits at SCE Funding Allocations – contact the Division of State Funding at Questions regarding Title I – consult with your ESC Title I contact or the NCLB Division at Questions regarding SCE – consult with your ESC SCE contact or the Division of Financial Audits at

76 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 Thorough Documentation is Essential! Do you know where your district maintains this required information? State at-risk criteria Local criteria and information regarding 10 percent cap Entrance and exit policies Calculation of the 110 percent satisfactory performance on all assessment instruments District and campus needs assessment District and campus improvement plans Chinese Proverb - The palest ink is better than the best memory. 76

77 Copyright © Texas Education Agency 2006 If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. Thomas Jefferson Education is Freedom 77


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