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Stickler Syndrome in Schools by Peggy Green General Education Teacher Sacramento City Unified School District

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Presentation on theme: "Stickler Syndrome in Schools by Peggy Green General Education Teacher Sacramento City Unified School District"— Presentation transcript:

1 Stickler Syndrome in Schools by Peggy Green General Education Teacher Sacramento City Unified School District

2 A Little About Me… I am a classroom teacher in Sacramento, CA. I work for the Sacramento City Unified School District. I am a general education teacher – I teach Language Arts and World History at the Middle School Level.

3 A Little About Ben… Shortly after Ben was born, he was diagnosed with Stickler syndrome. He had open heart surgery as an infant and has had several other complications that set back his development. With the help of many early interventions and therapies, Ben has made great progress and is a happy, temper tantrum throwing three year old!

4 Todays Presentation… How to advocate for your child with Stickler syndrome in K-12 school system Time for Questions/Comments My contact information will also be provided; the information from this slideshow is already available on the SIP website

5 Special Education Law and Stickler Syndrome The type of accommodations/services in school that your child will require, if any, depends on your childs involvement with Stickler syndrome.

6 Special Education Law and Stickler Syndrome If your child has been diagnosed with Stickler syndrome by a health care professional, he or she is entitled to a Free and Appropriate Education (FAPE). Your child will qualify for services under the Federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and/or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

7 Special Education Law and Stickler Syndrome The IDEA is a law that addresses the educational needs of children with disabilities from ages The ADA ensures that children have equal access to education; it allows for accommodations to provide students with equal access to education services.

8 Special Education Law and Stickler Syndrome Because your child has Stickler syndrome, he or she will most likely benefit from either: –a 504 plan (associated with the ADA law) OR –an IEP (Individualized Education Plan – associated with the IDEA law).

9 What are the Differences Between IEPs and 504s? The ADA (504 plan) is a civil rights law, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, that ensures students equal access to education regardless of his or her disability. For a student to be eligible for a 504 plan, he/she must have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. It must be due to the disability that the student is unable to gain equal access and benefit from school programs and services.

10 What are the Differences Between IEPs and 504s? IDEA (IEP plan) governs access to special education and related services. It establishes safeguards for disabled students under the law. IDEA ensures that a child with a disability is given an IEP that is designed to meet the childs individual needs.

11 What are the Differences Between IEPs and 504s? The easiest way to understand whether your child needs an IEP or 504 is to answer the following: Does Stickler syndrome adversely affect your childs educational performance? –If so, your child is eligible for special education services under IDEA.

12 What are the differences between IEPs and 504s? If Stickler syndrome does not adversely affect your childs educational performance to the extent that special education services are needed, then your child will probably not be eligible for an IEP under IDEA. Your child will likely qualify for protections under a 504 plan.

13 Continued in Part II


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