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The Core Principles of Media Literacy Education. National Association for Media Literacy Education national membership organization mission to expand.

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Presentation on theme: "The Core Principles of Media Literacy Education. National Association for Media Literacy Education national membership organization mission to expand."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Core Principles of Media Literacy Education

2 National Association for Media Literacy Education national membership organization mission to expand and inspire the practice of media literacy education dedicated to ensuring that all people have the skills needed to critically analyze and create messages using the wide variety of communication tools now available only national organization devoted to MLE

3 National Association for Media Literacy Education

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7 From what to how The Core Principles of Media Literacy Education is a document that frames the key elements of media literacy education and provides guidelines for incorporating the Principles in educational settings. The Core Principles encompass the opportunities and possibilities of 21st century learning technologies to transform both learning and teaching.

8 From what to how The Core Principles articulate a common ground around which media literacy educators and advocates can coalesce. The Core Principles are a springboard for vibrant and ongoing dialogue, and as a first step in the development of clear, measurable outcomes and benchmarks for U.S. schools.

9 The Core Principles of Media Literacy Education 1. Media Literacy Education requires active inquiry and critical thinking about the messages we receive and create. 2. Media Literacy Education expands the concept of literacy (i.e., reading and writing) to include all forms of media. 3. Media Literacy Education builds and reinforces skills for learners of all ages. Like print literacy, those skills necessitate integrated, interactive, and repeated practice. 4. Media Literacy Education develops informed, reflective and engaged participants essential for a democratic society. 5. Media Literacy Education recognizes that media are a part of culture and function as agents of socialization. 6. Media Literacy Education affirms that people use their individual skills, beliefs and experiences to construct their own meanings from media messages.

10 1. Media Literacy Education requires active inquiry and critical thinking about the messages we receive and create. Implications for practice: (highlights) MLE…effective media analysis is based on the Key Questions MLE…is not about replacing students perspectives with someone elses MLE…trains students to ask WHAT is the bias…not IS there bias

11 2. Media Literacy Education expands the concept of literacy (i.e., reading and writing) to include all forms of media. Implications for practice: (highlights) MLE encompasses both analysis and expression MLE welcomes the use of a broad range of media texts, including popular media MLE is not a political movement, it is an educational discipline

12 3. Media Literacy Education builds and reinforces skills for learners of all ages. Like print literacy, those skills necessitate integrated, interactive, and repeated practice. Implications for practice: (highlights) MLE…uses co-learning pedagogies…teachers learn from students and students learn from teachers and classmates MLE…is not about inoculating people against presumed or actual harmful media effects MLE…helps students learn to make informed decisions about time spent using media and which media they choose to use.

13 4. Media Literacy Education develops informed, reflective and engaged participants essential for a democratic society. Implications for practice: (highlights) MLE invites and respects diverse points of view Censorship or other efforts aimed at keeping selected media beyond the access of selected audiences do not achieve the skill-building goals of MLE MLE is not a substitute for media (industry) meeting its responsibility to serve the public interest

14 5. Media Literacy Education recognizes that media are a part of culture and function as agents of socialization. Implications for practice: (highlights) MLE integrates media texts that present diverse voices, perspectives and communities MLE addresses topics like violence, gender, sexuality, racism, stereotyping, and other issues of representation MLE does not start from a premise that media are inconsequential nor that media are a problem

15 6. Media Literacy Education affirms that people use their individual skills, beliefs and experiences to construct their own meanings from media messages. Implications for practice: (highlights) MLE is not about teaching students what to think; it is about teaching them how they can arrive at informed choices that are most consistent with their own values MLE helps students become aware of and reflect on the meaning that they make of media messages

16 The Key Questions The Core Principles can also be approached as KEY QUESTIONS. Consider the following KEY QUESTIONS when bringing Media Literacy Education into your classroom.

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18 Key Questions to ask when analyzing media messages…

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20 How can you be sure your lesson is developing the habits of inquiry and skills of expression that are central to media literacy education? Consider… Are students asking their own questions about media? Are students asking questions when they are making media as well as using media? Are students using multiple means of expression? (image, sound word) Are students seeking multiple sources of information to determine which is most appropriate or reliable for the task? Are students being asked to justify opinions or interpretations with specific, document-based evidence?

21 How can you be sure your lesson is developing the habits of inquiry and skills of expression that are central to media literacy education? Consider… Are students incorporating analysis and/or examination of how media structures (e.g., ownership, sponsorship, or distribution) influence how they make meaning of media messages? Are students focusing on a media documents significance (including who benefits and who is disadvantaged) rather than trying to determine whether a particular piece of media is good or bad? Are students moving through anger and cynicism about media to skepticism, reflection, and action?

22 For more information visit: Special thanks to the authors of the Core Principles of Media Literacy Education and to the many scholars on whose work the Core Principles is based.


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