Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Theres no great mystery to satisfying your customers. Build them a quality product and treat them respect. Its that simple.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Theres no great mystery to satisfying your customers. Build them a quality product and treat them respect. Its that simple."— Presentation transcript:

1 Theres no great mystery to satisfying your customers. Build them a quality product and treat them respect. Its that simple.

2 Theres no great mystery to satisfying your students. Build them a quality product and treat them respect. Its that simple.

3 The Way It Was , Voic , FAX, pagers

4 The Way It Was Online Information: Web Catalogs Networked Databases Britannica Online Online Newspapers

5 The Way It Was track tapes and LPsCompact Disks and DAT Dorm keysPDI access Cash and money ordersATM and Flex ChalkboardsMultimedia Hand copyingPhotocopying Registration linesSIS+ TextbooksCD ROMs

6 The Way It Was Since our first years on campus, university students and their campus experiences have changed in many ways. Will their classroom and learning experiences be any different from ours? Or will we simply teach them as we were taught?

7 Undergraduate education in research universities requires renewed emphasis on a point strongly made by John Dewey almost a century ago: learning is based on discovery guided by mentoring rather than on transmission of information. Inherent in inquiry-based learning is an element of reciprocity: faculty can learn from students as students are learning from faculty. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) I. Make Research-Based Learning the Standard

8 SIGNS OF CHANGE:University Case Study Problem-based LearningUniversity of Delaware Problem-based learning was adopted in all basic science classes at the University of Delaware to promote active learning and connect concepts to applications. Students are not given all the information they need to solve the open-ended real-world problems, but are responsible for finding and using appropriate sources. They work in teams with access to an instructor; trained graduate or undergraduate students help lead some groups. I. Make Research-Based Learning the Standard Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998)

9 The first year of a university experience needs to provide new stimulation for intellectual growth and a firm grounding in inquiry-based learning and communication of information and ideas. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) II. Construct an Inquiry-Based Freshman Year

10 The freshman experience must be consolidated by extending its principles into the following years. Inquiry-based learning, collaborative experience, writing and speaking expectations need to characterize the whole of a research university education. Those students who enter the research university later than the freshman year need to be integrated smoothly into this special atmosphere. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) III. Build on the Freshman Foundation

11 Research universities must remove barriers to and create mechanisms for much more interdisciplinary undergraduate education. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) IV. Remove Barriers to Interdisciplinary Education

12 Undergraduate education must enable students to acquire strong communication skills, and thereby create graduates who are proficient in both written and oral communication. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) V. Link Communication Skill and Course Work

13 Because research universities create technological innovations, their students should have the best opportunities to learn state-of-the-art practices -- and learn to ask questions that stretch the uses of technology. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) VI. Use Information Technology Creatively

14 The final semester(s) should focus on a major project and utilize to the fullest the research and communication skills learned in the previous semesters. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) VII. Culminate with a Capstone Experience

15 Research universities must redesign graduate education to prepare students for teaching undergraduate students as well as for other professional roles. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) VIII. Educate Graduate Students as Apprentice Teachers

16 Research universities must commit themselves to the highest standards in teaching as well as research and create faculty reward structures that validate that commitment. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) IX. Change Faculty Reward Systems

17 Research universities should foster a community of learners. Large universities must find ways to create a sense of place and to help students develop small communities within the larger whole. Ten Ways to Change Undergraduate Education (Boyer Commission, 1998) X. Cultivate a Sense of Community

18 Your Own Observations? From your own experience as students or teachers, what best practices have you observed that you might use in your own classes?

19 Characteristics Needed in College Graduates High level of communication skills Ability to define problems, gather and evaluate information, develop solutions Team skills -- ability to work with others Ability to use all of the above to address problems in a complex real-world setting Quality Assurance in Undergraduate Education (1994) Wingspread Conference, ECS, Boulder, CO.

20 Cooperative Learning: What the research shows Academic Success higher achievement, including knowledge acquisition, accuracy, creativity in problem-solving, and higher reasoning level. Attitude Effects persistence towards goals, intrinsic motivation, applying learning in other situations, greater time on task Johnson, Johnson, and Smith (1998 )

21 What are the Common Features of PBL? Learning is initiated by a problem. Problems are based on complex, real-world situations. Information needed to solve problem is not initially given. Students identify, find, and use appropriate resources. Students work in permanent groups. Learning is active, integrated, cumulative, and connected.

22 Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education ITUE was created to promote reform of undergraduate education through faculty development and course design. Institute Fellows receive hands-on experience in employing active learning strategies and effective use of technology in their classrooms. In addition, Fellows are eligible for discretionary funding to support transformation of their courses.

23 Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education Fellows: 115 faculty members, 42 departments, all colleges.

24 Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education Summer Sessions: Education Reform and Active/Group Learning Effective Use of Technology Learning Objectives Experience It Yourself -- Problem-Based Learning Getting Started -- The Syllabus The Internet as a Learning Resource Incorporating Active Learning in the Classroom Getting Started with Groups Problems and Cases: Writing Material for Your Course Internet Resources for Your Course Student Assessment and Assessment Strategies Evaluation of Transformation Projects Building a Web Site for Your Course

25 Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education The Leaders: Deborah Allen Biological Sciences Harry Shipman Physics and Astronomy Valerie Hans Criminal Justice/Sociology Sue Groh Chemistry and Biochemistry Hal White Chemistry and Biochemistry Betsy Lieux Nutrition and Dietetics George Watson Physics and Astronomy Barbara Duch Math/Science Education Resource Center

26 Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education Applications: What are your objectives for students in this course? How would you like to change the way you teach? How would supplemental funding assist your development of this course?

27 Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education Dec. 17Registration due Jan 10-14Winter Session Mid-AprilApplications due June 12-16Summer Session 1999 Calendar:

28 Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education For additional information on objectives, activities, and application:

29


Download ppt "Theres no great mystery to satisfying your customers. Build them a quality product and treat them respect. Its that simple."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google