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NNMREC Work Session: Regional Developments in Marine Energy March 23, 2011 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Brian Polagye University of.

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Presentation on theme: "NNMREC Work Session: Regional Developments in Marine Energy March 23, 2011 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Brian Polagye University of."— Presentation transcript:

1 NNMREC Work Session: Regional Developments in Marine Energy March 23, 2011 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Brian Polagye University of Washington Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center

2 NNMREC NNMREC Organization Tidal and Wave Research Technology Environment New Initiatives

3 NNMREC National Marine Renewable Energy Centers Hawaii National Marine Renewable Energy Center (HINMREC) University of Hawaii Wave, OTEC Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC) Florida Atlantic Ocean Current Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) University of Washington (tidal) Oregon State University (wave) National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL)

4 NNMREC NNMREC Objectives Develop a full range of capabilities to support wave and tidal energy development. Center activities: Facilitate technology commercialization, Inform regulatory and policy decisions, Close key gaps in understanding, and Educate the first generation of marine renewable energy engineers and scientists.

5 NNMREC Virtual Center Organization Environment Acoustics Dynamic Effects Benthic Ecosystems Sediment Transport Social Fisheries/Crabbing Outreach/Engagement Existing Ocean Users Local/State Economy Technology Testing and Demonstration Site Characterization Advanced Materials Device and Array Design/Modeling

6 NNMREC NNMREC Organization Tidal and Wave Research Technology Environment New Initiatives

7 NNMREC Need for National Test Sites Lack of at-sea test facilities for marine renewable energy is a major barrier to technology innovation. Regulatory process currently weights ad hoc testing towards environmental monitoring. A truly integrated test facility should address technology readiness, environmental effects, and cost effectiveness. Opportunity for US to show worldwide leadership –Existing worldwide facilities only partially meet requirements. –Existing worldwide facilities are at resource and geographic extremes.

8 NNMREC Wave Testing Plans (Existing) (Future) Long Wave Fume 104 m x 3.7 m x 4.6 m Columbia Power Technology 1:15 scale Tsunami Wave Basin 49 m x 26.5 m x 2.1 m 2008 Open Ocean Buoy Test – Newport, OR Model Validation at OSU Facilities 20kW Wave Energy Linear Test Bed (WESRF), 2m stroke Tank Testing in Regular and Irregular Waves (HWRL) Scale Testing 1:35-100, TRL: Small-scale Device Testing at OSU Facilities 2-D flume with regular waves: 0-1m in 3m water depth 3-D tank with irregular waves: 0-0.5m in 1.5m water depth Scale Testing 1:15-50, TRL: Field Testing (Intermediate Scale) Yaquina Bay, OR: Wind Waves: 0-0.2m in 7.6m water depth Puget Sound, WA: Wind Waves: 0-1m in 16m water depth Scale Testing 1:5-10, TRL: Open Ocean Device Testing & Demonstration 1 MW Mobile Ocean Test Berth (MOTB) Newport, Oregon: Water depth 40-50m Full Scale Testing, TRL: 7 - 9

9 NNMREC Wave Mobile Ocean Test Berth (MOTB) Developed prototype testing equipment for 2007 & 2008 tests Phase 1 (underway) Permitted open-ocean test site Intermediate-scale testing (TRL 4-6) Phase 2 Cable to shore-based infrastructure (non-grid connected) Two device berths (TRL 7-8) Phase 3 Grid interconnection Two device berths (TRL 7-9)

10 NNMREC National Tidal Energy Platform Potential Site Seattle Everett Snohomish PUD Project Energetic tidal resource, but a smoother transition from lab to field Capability to test a range of device scales and technology readiness levels Close proximity to electrical grid Close proximity to maritime operation and manufacturing capabilities Outside of vessel traffic lanes Does not conflict with pilot or commercial deployment plans

11 NNMREC Infrastructure Concept Water Depth (m) Monitoring Node Test Berth Berth B (30m) Berth C (50 m) Berth A (20 m) Intermediate to full-scale testing at a single location (TRL 7-9) Cabled to shore and grid connected Environmental and performance monitoring nodes

12 NNMREC Advanced Materials Testing Composite Aging Biofouling Foul Release Coatings Corrosion

13 NNMREC High Resolution Device Modeling Turbine-Wake Interactions Array Optimization Pressure Fluctuations

14 NNMREC High Resolution Site Modeling Departure from Bi-directional Flow Bidirectional Asymmetric Device Selection and Siting

15 NNMREC NNMREC Organization Tidal and Wave Research Technology Environment New Initiatives

16 NNMREC Environmental Monitoring Motivation Site-specific information is needed by multiple parties: Optimal siting Existing information is insufficient Approaches to close knowledge gaps are underdeveloped Site Developers Device Developers Regulatory Agencies Design loads Environmental context

17 NNMREC Monitoring Platforms Seabed Instrumentation Sea Spider Tripod Shipboard Survey R/V Jack Robertson Land Observation AIS Ship Tracks

18 NNMREC Sea Spider Instrumentation Packages Water Quality Water Sampler WA Dept. of Ecology partnership Ambient Noise Hydrophones Fish Species Tag Receiver Current Velocity Doppler profiler Harbor Porpoise Presence Specialized Hydrophones Graduate Student

19 NNMREC Snohomish PUD Partnership Instrumentation Deployments: April 09-Present Methodology Development Methodology Implementation Site Data Applied Research

20 NNMREC Establishing Context Strong Currents Overnight Lull in Shipping First Run for Passenger Ferry Recording Hydrophone Automatic Identification System Doppler Profiler

21 NNMREC Evaluating Environmental Effects Recording Hydrophone CPod Automatic Identification System Doppler Profiler Data Collection Data Synthesis and Analysis Potential for Behavioral Change Estimated Environmental Effect Species Behavior Estimated Stress

22 NNMREC Developing Capabilities Infrared Camera Southern Resident Killer Whale Detection July 5, 2010 at 0350 (Lime Kiln State Park) High Definition Camera

23 NNMREC NNMREC Organization Tidal and Wave Research Technology Environment New Initiatives

24 NNMREC Tidal Micropower Helical Turbine Generator Support Frame Oceanographic measurements are fundamentally power limited Integrated energy harvesting could provide W continuous power Modular alternative to cabled observatories

25 NNMREC Rivers and Constructed Channels Potential for power generation from in-stream turbines installed in the fast-moving waters downstream from Columbia River dams Incremental environmental impact should be very small In-stream turbines for flow control and power generation as potential alternative for energy- dissipating sluice gates

26 NNMREC Deep Water Offshore Wind WA and OR: 300 GW resource Floating platform technology required for deep water Platforms can be built and systems assembled in WA and OR PPI currently installing full-scale demo unit off Portugal Initial study on environmental impacts and permit streamlining for PPI Wind- Wave Float technology completed by UW-NNMREC UW and OSU PIs currently responding two 2 major funding announcements by US DOE

27 NNMREC Conclusions Marine energy Centers are developing capabilities to move technology from concept to commercialization. Need for broad and sustained partnerships between Centers, industry, and public stakeholders. Opportunity for universities to solve challenges and to train the first generation of marine energy engineers.


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