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Apply innovation Slide 1 Renishaw scanning technology Renishaws innovative approach to scanning system design compared with conventional solutions technology.

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Presentation on theme: "Apply innovation Slide 1 Renishaw scanning technology Renishaws innovative approach to scanning system design compared with conventional solutions technology."— Presentation transcript:

1 apply innovation Slide 1 Renishaw scanning technology Renishaws innovative approach to scanning system design compared with conventional solutions technology Issue 2

2 apply innovation Slide 2 Questions to ask your metrology system supplier Do my measurement applications require a scanning solution? –how many need to be scanned? –how many need discrete point measurement? If I need to scan, what is the performance of the system? –scanning accuracy at high speeds –total measurement cycle time, including stylus changes If I also need to measure discrete points, how fast can I do this?

3 apply innovation Slide 3 Questions to ask your metrology system supplier Will I benefit from the flexibility of an articulating head –access to the component –sensor and stylus changing What are the lifetime costs? –purchase price –what are the likely failure modes and what protection is provided? –repair / replacement costs and speed of service

4 apply innovation Slide 4 Probing applications - factors Manufacturers need a range of measurement solutions. Why? machining processes have different levels of stability: stable form : therefore control size and position discrete point measurement form variation significant : therefore form must be measured and controlled scanning

5 apply innovation Slide 5 Probing applications - factors Manufacturers need a range of measurement solutions. Why? Features have different functions: for clearance or location form is not important Discrete point measurement for functional fits form is critical and must be controlled Scanning Measured values Best fit circle Maximum inscribed (functional fit) circle

6 apply innovation Slide 6 Scanning Typical scanning routines to measure form Scanning provides much more information about the form of a feature than discrete point measurement Spiral scanning of a cylinder bore gathers data about feature size, position, orientation and form

7 apply innovation Slide 7 Renishaw scanning - our objectives speed and accuracy –design sensors with high dynamic response to provide high accuracy data at high speed –accurate through use of sophisticated probe calibration –match styli materials to applications for best results flexibility –probe changing –stylus changing –articulation cost effectiveness –innovative hardware and scanning techniques reduce complexity –robust designs and responsive service for lower lifetime costs

8 apply innovation Slide 8 Renishaw scanning systems Articulating heads Probe and stylus changing Renishaw scanning sensor design Active and passive scanning probe design Performance styli for scanning

9 apply innovation Slide 9 Active or passive sensors? Passive sensorsActive sensors Design –active sensors are large, heavy and complex –passive sensors are small and relatively simple Complexity 3 force generators 3 dampers LVDTs mounted on stacked axes Simplicity no motor drives no locking mechanism no tare system no electromagnets no electronic damping

10 apply innovation Slide 10 Passive sensors Simple, compact mechanism –no motor drives –no locking mechanism –no tare system –no electromagnets –no electronic damping springs generate contact force –force varies with deflection Deflection Typical scanning deflection Force

11 apply innovation Slide 11 Active sensors Complex, larger mechanism force generators in each axis force is modulated in probe –not constant at stylus tip* deflection varies as necessary –longer axis travels Axis drive force generator Displacement sensor Deflection Force Controlled force range * see next slide

12 apply innovation Slide 12 Active sensors Errors in force modulation at stylus tip force is modulated at each stacked axis mechanism & stylus mass, plus stylus stiffness connect force generator to stylus tip errors that lead to uncontrolled stylus force: –inertial acceleration of stylus mass –error in estimating probe acceleration (d 2 x p /dt 2 ) –error in estimating probe velocity (dx p /dt) –error in estimating quill acceleration (d 2 x q /dt 2 ) –force feedback error (e Fp ) Force F p controlled here What matters is force F s here Probe mechanism mass Stylus mass FpFp FsFs kpkp cpcp ksks xpxp xsxs xqxq Quill

13 apply innovation Slide 13 Method of control Passive sensorsActive sensors effectively a miniature CMM force generators control the deflection to modulate the force on the stylus 6 axes under servo control –conceived in 1970s to accommodate poor machine motion control simple device senses deflection no powered motion measurements taken using machine to control stylus deflection 3 axes under servo control –new devices take advantage of modern CMM motion control Compact passive sensor Complex active sensor

14 apply innovation Slide 14 Sensor design and calibration Passive sensorsActive sensors large probe travel needed to keep the contact force steady during scanning direction- dependent stylus bending variations minimised by controlling the contact force smaller axis travels required –at 300 mm/sec, deflections can be held within a 100 µm range* stylus bending compensated by sophisticated calibration routine Compact passive sensor Complex active sensor * using adaptive scanning

15 apply innovation Slide 15 Dynamic response Passive sensorsActive sensors motorised stylus carrier –driven on internal servo loop light weight –high natural frequency suspension system Probe suspension responds whilst scan vector is adjusted Motors adjust stylus position to modulate contact force

16 apply innovation Slide 16 Scanning probe calibration Constant force does not equal constant stylus deflection although active sensors provide modulated probe force, stylus bending varies, depending on the contact vector stylus stiffness is very different in Z direction (compression) to in the XY plane (bending) if you are scanning in 3 dimensions (not just in the plane of the stylus), this is important –e.g. valve seats –e.g. gears F F Deflection High deflection when bending Low deflection in compression

17 apply innovation Slide 17 Scanning probe calibration modulated force does not result in better accuracy –passive & active sensors must both cope with non-linear stylus bending –how the probe is calibrated is important Passive sensors passive probes have contact forces that are predictable at each {x,y,z} position scanning probe axis deflections are driven by the contact vector sensor mechanism and stylus bending calibrated together Active sensors contact force is controlled, and therefore not related to {x,y,z} position calibration must linearise output of readheads, mechanism motion and stylus bending longer styli increase bending variation

18 apply innovation Slide 18 Effective calibration for superior 3D scanning SP80 testing at Renishaw sub micron 2D and 3D scanning performance –2D:0.3 m –3D:1.0 m ISO unknown path raw data - no data filtering Test details: CMM spec L/1000 Test time 97 secs Controller UCC1 FilterNone Stylus length50 mm

19 apply innovation Slide 19 Measurement performance Passive sensorsActive sensors motorised probe mechanism enables high speed scanning slow discrete point measurement cycles due to the need to servo and static average probe data heat sources: motors and control circuits generate heat that must be measured and compensated low inertia probe holds surface at high speeds fast discrete point measurement cycles with 'extrapolate to zero' routines no heat sources for improved stability –500 mW power consumption –< 1ºC temperature change inside probe

20 apply innovation Slide 20 Minimum inspection cycle times High speed measurement High speed scanning on a large component Scanning a complex surface at high speed

21 apply innovation Slide 21 Minimum inspection cycle times High speed measurement Rapid discrete point measurement and scanning combined Video commentary scanning probe taking discrete points at high speed extrapolate to zero routines high speed scanning

22 apply innovation Slide 22 Robustness Passive sensorsActive sensors more things to go wrong –force generators –locking mechanism –tare system –electromagnets –electronic damping –control hardware for the above limited crash protection if the stylus is deflected beyond its limits more complex motion control simplicity –position feedback system is only electro-mechanical element –no moving wires kinematic stylus changing and patented Z over-travel bump stop provide robust crash protection –probe will survive most accidents simpler motion control

23 apply innovation Slide 23 Robustness Crash protection Detachable styli allow stylus overtravel without damage to the probe or component Video commentary overtravel in XY plane causes stylus module to unseat stop signal generated stylus reseats as machine backs off surface probe still operational

24 apply innovation Slide 24 Lifetime costs Passive sensorsActive sensors higher purchase costs –complex and high cost sensor higher running costs –complex sensor –limited crash protection –vendor technician needed to remove damaged sensor –more downtime –high repair charges lower purchase costs –simple and cost-effective to purchase lower running costs –crash protection for greater reliability –50,000+ hours operating life –advance replacement service at discounted price –customer-replacement on site due to simple fittings –less downtime –cost-effective repair

25 apply innovation Slide 25 Renishaw scanning systems Articulating heads Probe and stylus changing Renishaw scanning sensor design Active and passive scanning probe design Performance styli for scanning

26 apply innovation Slide 26 Renishaw scanning sensor design Renishaw design objectives: optimised for high speed measurement accurate position sensing without stacked axis errors compact and light, with excellent dynamic response models for quill mounting and use with articulating heads passive design to avoid unnecessary system complexity SP600M mounted on a PH10M indexing head

27 apply innovation Slide 27 Renishaw scanning probes - quill mounted SP600Q in-quill version of SP600 reduced impact on working volume suitable for any quill size SP80 quill-mounted digital readheads for ultra-high accuracy very long styli

28 apply innovation Slide 28 Renishaw scanning probes - for articulating heads SP600M styli up to 300 mm flexible part access robust changeable with other sensors SP25M ultra-compact design (25 mm diameter) styli up to 200 mm interchangeable with touch- trigger probing

29 apply innovation Slide 29 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Passive sensor - no force generators minimal heat source for greater stability no electro-mechanical wear reduced vibration during discrete point measurement

30 apply innovation Slide 30 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Box spring mechanism - SP600 and SP80 unique design compact mechanism - fits inside Ø50 mm (2 in) probe low inertia rapid dynamic response low spring rates single 3D ferrofluid damper Parallel acting springs

31 apply innovation Slide 31 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Pivoting probe mechanism - SP25M patented, pivoting mechanism featuring isle of Man spring ultra-compact mechanism - fits inside a Ø25 mm (1 in) probe very low inertia very low spring rates (< 60 g/mm) high natural frequency (rigid member) when in contact with the component Isle of Man spring creates XY pivot point Second spring allows translation in all direction

32 apply innovation Slide 32 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Isolated optical metrology - SP600 readheads attached to probe housing measures deflection of whole mechanism, not just one axis –eliminates inter-axis errors –picks up thermal and dynamic effects probes with stacked axes cannot measure inter-axis errors directly Inter-axis error Readheads attached to probe body Z pos Y pos X pos Illustration shows SP600 mechanism with PSDs

33 apply innovation Slide 33 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Isolated optical metrology - SP80 SP80 features digital readheads with 0.02 m resolution reading precision gratings accuracy defined by straightness of lines on each grating and calibrated squareness of gratings, not by probe mechanical design ISO test data: ISO Diff:0.6 m ISO Tij:1.0 m CMM spec L / 1000 Test time 61 secs Controller UCC1 FilterNone Stylus 50 mm, 9 mm, ceramic Note - results quoted are for unknown path scans.

34 apply innovation Slide 34 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Isolated optical metrology - SP25M IREDs in probe body reflect light off mirrors in stylus module back onto PSDs non-linear outputs compensated by sophisticated 3rd order polynomial algorithms IRED Kinematic joint between probe body and stylus module (not shown) 2 PSDs detect stylus deflection Mirror ISO test data: ISO Diff:1.3 m ISO Tij:2.6 m CMM spec L / 1000 Test time 57 secs Controller UCC1 FilterNone Stylus 50 mm, 5 mm, ceramic SP25M probe body

35 apply innovation Slide 35 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Kinematic stylus changing optimise stylus and hence repeatability for each feature: –minimum length Longer styli degrade repeatability –maximum stiffness –minimum joints –maximum ball size Maximum effective working length repeatable re-location –no need for re-qualification passive –no signal cables –easy installation Kinematic stylus changing in around 10 seconds means that you can pick the best stylus for each feature

36 apply innovation Slide 36 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Feature access - SP80 SP80 can support very long and complex styli 500 mm (19.7 in) 500 g (17.6 oz) suitable for measurement of deep features on large components no need for counter-balancing full measurement range is maintained irrespective of stylus mass and orientation

37 apply innovation Slide 37 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Feature access - SP80 SP80 scanning with a 500 mm (20 in) stylus for access to deep features Video commentary 500 mm (20 in) stylus cranked stylus no counter-balancing needed scanning deep features in F1 engine block

38 apply innovation Slide 38 Feature access - SP80 deep bore measurement - cranked / star styli Stylus length (mm) V2 m Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics VDI / VDE test data: CMM spec:0.5 + L / 1000 Test speed:5 mm/sec Controller:UCC1 Filter:50 Hz Values:Unknown path

39 apply innovation Slide 39 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Feature access - SP600 family SP600 scanning with a 200 mm (8 in) stylus for access to deep features Video commentary 200 mm (8 in) stylus scanning deep features in a cylinder block compact probe dimensions further extend the reach of the probe styli up to 280 mm (11.0 in) can be used with SP600 probes

40 apply innovation Slide 40 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Feature access - SP25M three scanning modules, each optimised for a range of stylus lengths same measuring range and accuracy in all orientations stiff carbon fibre stylus extensions provide excellent effective working length with M3 styli styli up to 200 mm (7.9 in)

41 apply innovation Slide 41 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Feature access - SP25M ISO test data accurate form measurement, even with long styli Stylus length (mm) ISO Tij m ISO test data: CMM spec:0.5 + L / 1000 Test speed:5 mm/sec Controller:UCC1 Filter:None / 60 Hz Values:Unknown path Filtered (60 Hz harmonic) No filter (raw data) 22: 3 mm, SS stem 50: 5 mm, ceramic stem 100: 6 mm, GF stem 200: 6 mm, GF stem

42 apply innovation Slide 42 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Feature access - SP25M probe is small enough to be inserted into many features total reach can be extended, with a probe extension, to nearly 400 mm (15.7 in) including length of probe body SP25M inspecting a deep counter-bore

43 apply innovation Slide 43 Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Feature access - SP25M probe can be mounted on an articulating head means that many features can be accessed with fewer styli lower stylus costs shorter cycle times

44 apply innovation Slide 44 Crash protection stylus change joint has low release force –over-travel in XY causes stylus to detach Z crash protection –outer housing provides a bump stop to prevent probe mechanism and readhead damage Stylus deforms in a severe Z crash, whilst probe mechanism is protected Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics Note - same principles apply to pivoting probes like SP25M.

45 apply innovation Slide 45 Crash protection Renishaw scanning probes are robust - even after bending or breaking the stylus, they still work! Video commentary steel stylus crushed against SP600 more severe than any Z crash since E Stop would prevent continued force bump-stop protection system saves probe mechanism probe was still functional after test completed Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics

46 apply innovation Slide 46 Compression test data Deflection (mm) Force (N) Stylus ball shatters ISO CMM spec 3 + L / 250 Test time 70 secs Controller UCC1 Filter None Stylus length 50 mm (All data in m) CircleBeforeAfter A B C D Result Circle A Circle B Circle C Circle D Renishaw scanning probes - key characteristics

47 apply innovation Slide 47 Renishaw scanning systems Articulating heads Probe and stylus changing Renishaw scanning sensor design Active and passive scanning probe design Performance styli for scanning

48 apply innovation Slide 48 Styli choice affects performance the stylus is a critical element in any scanning system affects: –feature access (stylus length and configuration, effective working length) –speed (weight affects dynamic response) –repeatability (stiffness, joints) –accuracy over time (wear, pick-up on stylus) choice of stylus configuration and materials must be driven by the application Stylus selection for scanning

49 apply innovation Slide 49 Configuration keep styli as short and as stiff as possible –avoid joints –articulating heads reduce the need for long styli where longer styli are essential, choose single-piece styli made from performance materials (e.g. M5 range for SP80): –graphite fibre stems (light and stiff) –titanium fittings Stylus selection for scanning Long graphite fibre stylus

50 apply innovation Slide 50 Three phenomena that can affect scanning accuracy in touch trigger probing, the stylus ball comes into temporary contact with the measured surface scanning results in a different and more aggressive type of surface interaction between the stylus and the workpiece testing at Renishaw has revealed three interactive phenomena: Effects of continuous scanning on stylus balls 1.Debris 2.Adhesive wear 3.Abrasive wear Sliding interaction between ball and surface

51 apply innovation Slide 51 Phenomenon 1 - debris any contamination present on the scanning path will collect on the stylus ball as it passes over the surface –metal oxide particles on the surface –air-born debris such as coolant mist or paper dust Effects of continuous scanning on stylus balls debris can be removed by wiping the ball with a dry, lint-free cloth –a periodic cleaning regime for the stylus ball is the only solution to avoid a build up of debris –debris is practically unavoidable with any contact scanning application and is independent of the stylus ball or scanned surface material Typical debris collected on a stylus ball after scanning

52 apply innovation Slide 52 Phenomenon 2 - adhesive wear adhesive wear (sometimes referred to as pick-up) involves the transfer of material from one surface to another –local welding (adhesion) at microscopic contact points –break off during sliding –minute particles from one surface are transferred to the other surface Effects of continuous scanning on stylus balls material adhesion is permanent and cannot be removed through normal cleaning techniques –as the surface material from the workpiece starts to adhere to the ball, it is the attached material which is now in contact with the surface –as like materials attract, rapid build up can occur –will eventually degrade the form of the stylus ball –compromised measuring results

53 apply innovation Slide 53 Phenomenon 2 - adhesive wear factors affecting adhesive wear: –contact force –distance scanned –hardness of surfaces (if stylus is much harder than surface being measured) –affinity between ball and surface materials … is it a similar material? –single point contact such conditions apply when scanning an aluminium surface with a relatively hard ruby (aluminium oxide) stylus ball –significant wear only occurs after long periods scanning the same part –in most real applications, the amount of material transfer is negligible on the form of the stylus ball (< 0.1 m) and cannot be quantified, even with the highest precision measuring equipment Effects of continuous scanning on stylus balls

54 apply innovation Slide 54 Phenomenon 2 - adhesive wear significant errors only occur in unrepresentative situations: Effects of continuous scanning on stylus balls Test conditions: ruby stylus on aluminium 15 g contact force, single point contact 350 m scan path over new material Results: small patch where adhesion occurs negligible impact on ball form Test conditions: ruby stylus on aluminium 15 g contact force, single point contact 350 m scan path over repeated path Results: 200 m x 500 m adhesion patch 2 m impact on ball form

55 apply innovation Slide 55 Phenomenon 3 - abrasive wear abrasive wear involves removal of material from both surfaces –small particles from both surfaces break and adhere to each surface –harder stylus particles attached to the component surface begin to act as an abrasive –where there is little atomic attraction between the two materials, wear rather than material build up occurs Effects of continuous scanning on stylus balls Test conditions: ruby on stainless steel 15 g contact force, single point contact 5,600 m scan path over new material very extreme - unrepresentative of most applications Results: flat on ball surface approx. 150 m diameter form error of 1.5 m

56 apply innovation Slide 56 Ball material - conclusions from testing at Renishaw ruby can suffer adhesive wear (pick-up) on aluminium under extreme conditions, but performs well in most applications ruby is the best material on stainless steel Stylus selection for scanning Ruby stylus used in touch- trigger mode

57 apply innovation Slide 57 Ball material - conclusions from testing at Renishaw silicon nitride is a good substitute for ruby in extreme aluminium applications, but suffers from abrasive wear on stainless steel and cast iron Stylus selection for scanning Silicon nitride stylus tip scanning an aluminium component

58 apply innovation Slide 58 Ball material - conclusions from testing at Renishaw zirconia is the optimum choice for scanning cast iron components tungsten carbide also performs well on cast iron Stylus selection for scanning Zirconia is often used where a large diameter tip is required Zirconia stylus tip and graphite fibre stem

59 apply innovation Slide 59 Renishaw scanning systems Articulating heads Probe and stylus changing Renishaw scanning sensor design Active and passive scanning probe design Performance styli for scanning

60 apply innovation Slide 60 Articulation or fixed sensors? Articulating heads are a standard feature of most computer- controlled CMMs –heads are the most cost-effective way to measure complex parts Fixed probes are best suited to small machines on which simple parts are to be measured –ideal for flat parts where a single stylus can access all features

61 apply innovation Slide 61 Renishaw articulating heads Increased flexibility… easy access to all features on the part repeatable re-orientation of the probe reduced need for stylus changing optimise stylus stiffness for better metrology Reduced costs… indexing is faster than stylus changing less expensive than active scanning systems reduced stylus costs simpler programming

62 apply innovation Slide 62 Renishaw articulating heads for scanning PH10M indexing head the industry standard PH10MQ in-quill version of PH10M reduced impact on working volume needs 80 mm quill PHS1 servo positioning head infinite range of orientations longer extension bars

63 apply innovation Slide 63 Articulating head applications Flexible probe orientation PH10M offers 7.5° increments in 2 axes - is this enough? prismatic parts –generally few features at irregular angles –use a custom stylus to suit the angle required –fixed scanning probes also need customer styli for such features Knuckle joint needed to access features at irregular angles

64 apply innovation Slide 64 Articulating head applications Flexible probe orientation PH10M offers 7.5° increments in 2 axes - is this enough? sheet metal / contoured parts –many features at different irregular angles –stylus must be perfectly aligned with surface in each case –no indexing head is suitable –fixed probes also unsuitable due to need for many stylus orientations –need continuously variable head (PHS1) Sheet metal Cylindrical stylus must be perfectly aligned with hole

65 apply innovation Slide 65 PH10M indexing head - design characteristics Head repeatability test results: Method: –50 measurements of calibration sphere at {A45,B45}, then 50 with an index of the PH10M head to {A0,B0} between each reading TP200 trigger probe with 10mm stylus Results: Comment: –indexing head repeatability has a similar effect on measurement accuracy to stylus changing repeatability ResultSpan fixedSpan index [Span] [Repeatability] X ± Y ± Z ±

66 apply innovation Slide 66 PH10M indexing head - design characteristics Indexing repeatability affects the measured position of features –Size and form are unaffected Most features relationships are measured in a plane –Feature positions are defined relative to datum features in the same plane (i.e. the same index position) Datum feature used to establish a part co-ordinate system –Therefore indexing typically has no negative impact on measurement results, but many benefits

67 apply innovation Slide 67 PH10M indexing head - design characteristics Light weight 650 g (1.4 lbs) lightest indexing head available total weight of < 1 kg including scanning probe Fast indexing typical indexing time is 2 to 3 seconds indexes can occur during positioning moves –no impact on measurement cycle time

68 apply innovation Slide 68 PH10M indexing head - design characteristics Flexible part access Rapid indexing during CMM positioning moves give flexible access with no impact on cycle times

69 apply innovation Slide 69 PH10M indexing head - design characteristics Autojoint programmable sensor changing with no manual intervention required use scanning and touch-trigger probes in the same measurement cycle Autojoint features kinematic connection for high repeatability

70 apply innovation Slide 70 PHS1 servo head - design characteristics Servo positioning for total flexibility full 360° rotation in two axes for total flexibility of part access –resolution of 0.2 arc sec –equivalent to 0.1µm at 100mm radius servo control of both axes for infinitely variable positioning and full velocity control –speeds of up to 150° per second –5-axis control required

71 apply innovation Slide 71 PHS1 servo head - design characteristics High torque for long reach extension bars of up to 750 mm (30 in) –ideal for auto body inspection –touch-trigger probes only Autojoint for use with SP600M powerful motors generate 2 Nm torque –4 times more than a PH10 –carry probes and extension bars of up to 1 kg (2.2 lbs)

72 apply innovation Slide 72 PHS1 servo head - design characteristics Infinitely variable positioning PHS1s motion can be combined with the CMM motion to generate blended 5 axis moves

73 apply innovation Slide 73 Renishaw scanning systems Articulating heads Probe and stylus changing Renishaw scanning sensor design Active and passive scanning probe design Performance styli for scanning

74 apply innovation Slide 74 ACR3 probe changer for use with PH10M 4 or 8 changer ports –store a range of sensors, extensions and stylus configurations Passive mechanism –CMM motion used to lock and unlock the Autojoint for secure and fully automatic sensor changes Compact rack with minimal footprint

75 apply innovation Slide 75 New ACR3 probe changer for use with PH10M Probe changing Quick and repeatable sensor changing for maximum flexibility Video commentary new ACR3 sensor changer no motors or separate control change is controlled by motion of the CMM

76 apply innovation Slide 76 ACR2 probe changer for use with PHS1 Probe module changing flexible storage of probes and extension bars

77 apply innovation Slide 77 FCR25 module and stylus changing for SP25M Passive rack enables both module and stylus changing modular rack system switch between scanning modules to suit application switch between scanning and touch-trigger modules Two sensors in one - switching between scanning and touch-trigger probing modules

78 apply innovation Slide 78 FCR25 module and stylus changing for SP25M Passive rack enables both module and stylus changing change styli to suit measurement task –scanning styli up to 200 mm –full range of TP20 modules combine with ACR3 for sensor changing Typical changing routine: stow TTP stylus stow TTP module pick up scan module pick up scan stylus

79 apply innovation Slide 79 SP600 stylus changing Passive rack simple design rapid stylus changes storage for up to 4 stylus modules –any number of racks can be used in a system kinematic stylus changing mechanism –highly repeatable connection between stylus and probe, –styli can be stored and re-used without the need for qualification crash protection from an overtravel mechanism in the base of the rack Rapid stylus changing with the passive SCR600 stylus change rack

80 apply innovation Slide 80 Renishaw scanning - our offering the fastest and most accurate scanning –passive scanning probes with dynamically superior mechanisms –sophisticated probe calibration –performance styli to match your application the most flexible and productive solution –probe changing –stylus changing –articulation the lowest ownership costs –innovative hardware and scanning techniques reduce complexity –robust designs and responsive service for lower lifetime costs

81 apply innovation Slide 81 Responsive service and expert support Application and product support wherever you are Renishaw has offices in over 20 countries responsive service to keep you running optional advance RBE (repair by exchange) service on many products we ship a replacement on the day you call trouble-shooting and FAQs on Service facility at Renishaw Inc, USA

82 apply innovation Slide 82 Questions? apply innovation


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