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10 Implementing an Effective Technology Training Program in Higher Education Presenter: E. John Shinsky, Ph.D. Associate Professor Grand Valley State University.

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Presentation on theme: "10 Implementing an Effective Technology Training Program in Higher Education Presenter: E. John Shinsky, Ph.D. Associate Professor Grand Valley State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 10 Implementing an Effective Technology Training Program in Higher Education Presenter: E. John Shinsky, Ph.D. Associate Professor Grand Valley State University College of Education Dos Donts The 4th Annual Emerging Technologies for Online Learning Symposium - Empowering Next Generation Teaching -

2 A Liberal Arts University in Grand Rapids Michigan College of Education Information Students 24, 500 Total 3, 405 Students in the COE 719 Undergraduate Students 2,686 Graduate Students Faculty & Staff 191 Faculty and Staff 51 (26.7%) Tenured/Tenure Track Faculty 71 (37.2 %) Non-Tenured/Tenure Track Faculty (Affil &Visit) 69 (36.1 %) Adjuncts Grand Valley State University

3 1. Urgency 2. Multi-generations 3. Attitude 4. Time of Training 5. Return on Investment 6. Incentives 7. Community 8. Flexibility 9. Experimentation & Risk-Taking 10. Ongoing Training – Lifelong Learning Professional Development Considerations

4 1. Priority 2. Full Support for Faculty and Staff 3. Responsiveness 4.Use of Effective Training Model - Process Oriented Perspective (Sprague, Kopfman, & Dorsey, 1998). - Awareness of what the technology can offer - Opportunity to explore technology integration - Time to learn technology - Application of technology to teaching - Reflection on teaching 5. A Rich Learning Community 6. Experimentation and Risk-Taking 7. Ongoing Training – Lifelong Learning 8. Sensitivity and Patience Professional Development Philosophy

5 Make technology training a priority, while intentionally designing and developing a technology infrastructure that is part of the strategic plan, and complements university goals. Establish a Technology Committee that represents all faculty and staff, and provides ongoing leadership for the infusion of technology with a focus on students, faculty and staff performance. Clearly define expected technology outcomes of training based on assessment data. Provide technology training with staff who are recognized for their expertise, are credible, respectful, and patient. Identify and address the barriers to the successful integration of technology that faculty members will likely face. Dos

6 Prepare faculty members to integrate technology tools into their instruction, with a focus on solving authentic School problems, while facilitating collaboration between students. Provide professional development that allows educators to exert control over the type of training provided, the content shared, practice and follow-up support needed. Provide training opportunities that best fit with faculty preferences. Provide face-to-face instruction as the predominant training mode so faculty can get immediate feedback, establish personal contacts, obtain peer assistance and ongoing support. Arrange opportunities for faculty members to model authentic use of technology and discuss the successes and challenges faced with learning and applying the technology. Dos 10

7 Establish a technology training program without working closely with instructional technology. Provide technology training without an array of supports that can be easily accessed. Assume that everyone has the appropriate technology equipment. Provide technology training without building a sustainable learning community. Integrate technology for technologys sake as opposed to facilitating the use of technology in meeting curriculum goals. Donts

8 Assume that faculty will ask all of their technology questions when participating in training sessions. Provide technology training without the opportunity for faculty members to observe the effective use of technology in instruction. Provide technology training without establishing a routine equipment upgrade program. Provide technology training without having a balance between learning the technology and effectively integrating it into teaching. Provide technology training without incentives. Donts 10

9 1. Individual Consultation with a Staff Member from IT 2. Individual Consultation with Peer 3. Hands-on Workshops with Food 4. University-wide Training 5. Technology Mentors 6. Training Newsletters 7. Online Training/Tutorial 8. Conferences 9. Peer Mentoring 10. Focused Training Teams Professional Development Options

10 Finley, L. & Hartman, D. (2004). Institutional Change and Resistance: Teacher Preparatory Faculty and Technology Integration. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 12(3), Norfolk, VA: AACE. Retrieved from Howland, J., & Wedman, J., (2004). A Process Model for Faculty Development: Individualizing Technology Learning. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, v12 n2 p Joyce, B., & Showers, B. (1995). Student achievement through staff development: Fundamentals of school renewal (2nd ed.). New York: Longman. Sprague, D., Kopfman, K., & Dorsey, S. (1998). Faculty development in the integration of technology in teacher education courses. Journal of Computing in Teacher Education, 2(14), Vannatta, R.A. (1999). Evaluating NCATE Technology Standards Implementation in a School of Education. In J. Price et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 1999 (pp ). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. Retrieved from References

11 Vannatta, R.A. (2000). Evaluation to Planning: Technology Integration in a School of Education. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, v8 n3 p Wilson, S., & Berne, J. (1998). Teacher learning and acquisition of professional knowledge: An examination of research on contemporary professional development. Review of Research in Education, 24, Weaver, D., Robbie, D. & Borland, R. (2008). The Practitioners Model: Designing a Professional Development Program for Online Teaching. International Journal on E-Learning, 7(4), Chesapeake, VA: AACE. Retrieved from References


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