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John Raynor – Business Research Services High Point Public Library Mark Sanders – Head of Reference East Carolina University.

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Presentation on theme: "John Raynor – Business Research Services High Point Public Library Mark Sanders – Head of Reference East Carolina University."— Presentation transcript:

1 John Raynor – Business Research Services High Point Public Library Mark Sanders – Head of Reference East Carolina University

2 Email was invented in 1971.

3 Before HTML, the browser, and the World-Wide Web

4 Email was invented in 1971. Before HTML, the browser, and the World-Wide Web Before the graphic user interface

5 Email was invented in 1971. Before the HTML, the browser, and the World-Wide Web Before the graphic user interface Before the personal computer An Apple I computer in its hand-made case, circa 1976

6 In September of 1971, ARPANET (the Internets precursor) had only 18 nodes

7 In September of 1971, ARPANET (the Internets precursor) had only 18 nodes The DEC PDP-10s at BBN Technologies of Cambridge, Massachusetts which sent, and received, the first ARPANET email with an @ sign (from Ray Tomlinsons personal web page)

8 In September of 1971, ARPANET (the Internets precursor) had only 18 nodes The DEC PDP-10s at BBN Technologies of Cambridge, Massachusetts which sent, and received, the first ARPANET email with an @ sign (from Ray Tomlinsons personal web page)

9 To its credit, email hasnt fallen completely behind the times, but its ability to display content is still seriously limited.

10 To its credit, email hasnt fallen completely behind the times

11 To its credit, email hasnt fallen completely behind the times, but its ability to display content is still seriously limited. Images are relegated to the end of the message, as attachments, and viewing them often involves extra steps.

12 To its credit, email hasnt fallen completely behind the times, but its ability to display content is still seriously limited. Email cant, moreover, display live content from the Internet – it can only provide links to it.

13 Traditional email is simply the electronic equivalent of the old-fashioned paper memo

14 You send an email message, and the recipient gets a copy… …which is as inert, and as immutable, as a paper memo in a filing cabinet.

15 Emails other problems: Original messages are appended to the ends of replies. Replying to one specific part of an email message involves cutting-and-pasting quoted passages, and inserting new text between them. Its hard to add new participants to an email-based conversation and bring them up to speed. Likewise, replying to some, but not all, of the people in an email-based conversation involves sending duplicate messages with edited recipient lists.

16 So what, then, is a wave?

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19 Email is like… sending memos back and forth

20 Email is like… sending memos back and forth Google Wave is like… sharing a conference room with your collaborators

21 Google Wave shares some features with other kinds of online communication/collaboration: Wikis and Google Docs: Multiple author documents with revision control

22 Google Wave shares some features with other kinds of online communication/collaboration: Wikis and Google Docs: Multiple author documents with revision control Instant Messaging: You can see whos logged in, and work together in real-time

23 Google Wave shares some features with other kinds of online communication/collaboration: Wikis and Google Docs: Multiple author documents with revision control Instant Messaging: You can see whos logged in, and work together in real-time Online Forums: Threaded conversations

24 Developed by brothers Lars and Jens Rasmussen in Sydney, Australia circa 2004-2007 Announced by Google May 2009 Preview released to 100,000 developers in September 2009 Released to the general public in May 2010 August 2010 - discontinue new standalone Wave development

25 Lets Look at a Wave

26 Running conversations both public (group) and private (individual)

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28 Embedded videos

29 Embedded web pages

30 Attached files

31 Photo slideshow

32 Gadgets – Maps

33 Gadgets – Yes/No/Maybe

34 Extensions – Polls

35 Robots

36 Extensions – Games

37 Sharing lots of information with a team and quickly making decisions

38 Communication which involves sharing images and files

39 Developing content collaboratively Writing the Declaration of Independence as a Google Wave demonstration

40 Developing content collaboratively An important caveat: Google Wave is good for working out what you want to say, but is not good for creating polished documents! Waves formatting and document-export capabilities are limited.

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42 The USF Tampa Librarys Experience with Wave Wave was used by the librarys website-redesign team Many issues converged before the site could go live Decisions had to be made quickly – it was crunch time Information had to be shared with the whole team

43 The USF Tampa Librarys Experience with Wave Unfortunately… Weekly team meetings were no longer enough Subsets of the team were sharing information by email, but not everyone was staying in the loop, all the time.

44 The USF Tampa Librarys Experience with Wave The new website went live in mid-December of 2009. The library hasnt used Google Wave since then.

45 A wave should not be regarded as a permanent product

46 A wave should not be regarded as a permanent product A waves potential for growth is naturally limited. As a wave grows, it tends to slow down.

47 A wave should not be regarded as a permanent product A wave does not, moreover, have much intrinsic structure

48 A wave should not be regarded as a permanent product A wave does not, moreover, have much intrinsic structure If a wave gets too big, finding the new content gets harder. In a busy wave, new blips may need to be re-posted

49 So how permanent is a wave? The USF-Tampa Librarys website-redesign experience: 6 project team-members used over a 6-week period 100-150 edits/day at peak use

50 So how permanent is a wave? The USF-Tampa Librarys website-redesign experience: 6 project team-members used over a 6-week period 100-150 edits/day at peak use 5 waves, roughly 1 per week

51 Keeping waves manageable Prune away digressions, empty blips, and any unneeded me-too blips. Get team-members to use Waves ability to thread replies

52 Keeping waves manageable Prune away digressions, empty blips, and any unneeded me-too blips. Get team-members to use Waves ability to thread replies Over-pruning can be reversed with the Playback function

53 Keeping waves manageable Divide your teams total traffic between two or more topic-specific waves. Each topic-specific wave gets less traffic, and thus last longer

54 Keeping waves manageable Divide your teams total traffic between two or more topic-specific waves. Each topic-specific wave gets less traffic, and thus last longer Agree, in advance, on a team policy for starting new waves.

55 Keeping waves manageable Divide your teams total traffic between two or more topic-specific waves. Each topic-specific wave gets less traffic, and thus last longer Agree, in advance, on a team policy for starting new waves.

56 Wave in a Box an application bundle including a server and web client supporting real-time collaboration using the same structured conversations as the Google Wave system a fast and fully-featured wave panel in the web client with complete support for threaded conversations a persistent wave store and search implementation for the server refinements to the client-server protocols gadget, robot and data API support support for importing wave data from wave.google.com wave.google.com the ability to federate across other Wave in a Box instances, with some additional configuration


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