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Pathways to Persistence Compass Project Learning Community Meeting April 23, 2010 Thomas Brown

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Presentation on theme: "Pathways to Persistence Compass Project Learning Community Meeting April 23, 2010 Thomas Brown"— Presentation transcript:

1 Pathways to Persistence Compass Project Learning Community Meeting April 23, 2010 Thomas Brown

2 Pathways to Persistence Reflect on the missions of your campuses and their goals for student engagement, learning and success. Why does student success matter? Review the status of student persistencetrends, theories, myths, realities. Test some theories through a simulation exercise: Pathways to Persistence

3 If you dont know where you are going, you might end up somewhere else…. Lewis Carroll

4 Universities are doing far more these days than educating students. In fact, the education function is becoming less dominant at many institutions, almost like an auxiliary enterprise…. Louis Paradise Chronicle of Higher Education January 6, 2004

5 Colleges and universities are businesses… students are a cost item, while research is a profit center. Marty Nemko, Chronicle of Higher Education, 2008

6 Colleges are in the dream business…. Bridgewater provides students with the finest possible educational experience and boundless opportunities to achieve…

7 Eastern Connecticut State University affords students the opportunity to acquire knowledge, values and skills necessary to pursue meaningful careers and advanced study, become productive members of their communities, and embrace lifelong learning.

8 Most of todays LSC students come to Lyndon for the opportunity to improve their social mobility….

9 The students who are least likely to attend college gain the strongest economic benefits from holding a college degree… Disadvantaged Students May Benefit Most from Attending College Chronicle of Higher Education April 1, 2010

10 You gotta be careful if you dont know where youre going, because you might not get there. Yogi Berra

11 Flagship public universities have become less accessible to low-income and students of color. Education Trust, 2007

12 Mission Answers the question: Why does this college exist?

13 Statement of Commitment As a member of the University, I pledge to help members of the community to realize their potential…. UMPI

14 BSC is strongly committed to serving the regions needs and is most committed to students who lack the educational and cultural opportunities available to their wealthier counterparts. The Mission of BSC About the College

15 Lyndon State College prepares every student for personal and professional success…. Lyndon State College Mission Statement Lyndon State College prepares every student for personal and professional success

16 Colleges are in the future business…. Teachers touch eternity. They never know where their influence stops. Henry Adams

17 Although faculty are formally designated as teachers, there are circumstances where others in the campus community are also teachers…. Professor Burns Crookston, University of Connecticut

18 It takes a campus community to support student achievement and success….

19 Increasing student persistence is a source of increasing concern in higher education…

20 Higher retention rates matter to policy makers, including federal and state legislators, who have a concern about low college graduation rates. USA Today, 10/12/05 (page 6D)

21 The University of Maine- Presque Isle has been committed to retention issues for many years through a wide variety of strategies….

22 Eastern Connecticut State University has recently implemented its new Strategic Plan, which has a primary objective of strengthening retention and graduation for all Eastern students…. About The College

23 Less than 60% of students earn a degree from their first institution of enrollment. One Step From the Finish Line The Education Trust, January 2005

24 77% of high income students 54% of low income students graduate in six years. The Education Trust, January 2005

25 National Collegiate Dropout and Graduation Rates ACT Institutional Data Questionnaire, since two-year and four-year institutions Institutional Data File

26 National Graduation Rates* Overall46.2% MA Public38.8 Traditional ( SAT) 37.8 Liberal ( ) 35.0 * Graduation in 5 years for BA/BS Source: ACT Institutional Data File. 2008

27 Graduation Rates* MA Public38.8 Traditional ( SAT) 37.8 Liberal ( ) 35.0 ECSU (mean SAT 1005) 45.7 BSC (mean SAT 1015) 42.2 LSC (mean SAT 915) 37.8 UMPI (n/a) 28.2 * 5 year graduation rate Source: Education Trust College Results On-line

28 The New American University measures its academic quality by the education its graduates received rather than by the academic credentials of the incoming freshman class…. ASU: A New American University

29 We want to be known more for the students we include than for those we exclude…. Dr. Michael Crow, President Arizona State University

30 Three types of attrition Expected and justified Stopping out Unnecessary and preventable by institutional interventions

31 Three types of attrition Expected and justified Stopping out Unnecessary and preventable by institutional interventions

32 Three terms used interchangeably RETENTION ATTRITION PERSISTENCE

33 RETENTION The process of holding or keeping in ones possession.

34 The process or state of being gradually worn down. ATTRITION Migrant Mother, Dorothea Lange Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division [ reproduction number LC-USF C]

35 PERSISTENCE To continue to exist or prevail, especially where others have not

36 Why students leave college Psychological factors Environmental factors Societal factors Institutional experiences What about us? What about me?

37 Public colleges and universities are far more likely to attribute attrition to student characteristics than to institutional characteristics. What Works in Student Retention, 2004

38 4We build beautiful campuses, 4 We hire distinguished faculty, We develop a challenging curriculum… … … then the wrong students show up! Dr. Betty Siegel, Past President Kennesaw State University (GA)

39 Why do students leave college? Incongruence What they encounter is not what they expected….

40 Often there is a Grand Canyon of difference between reality and what higher education institutions, especially research ones, tout in their viewbooks and on their websites…. Nemko, 2008

41 Bridgewater State College Expect More Achieve More EXPECT students to access exceptional growth opportunities defined by intensive engagement with a devoted faculty. EXPECT a rigorous and innovative academic environment that enriches the learning experience.

42 What do students expect? UMPI affirms, as central to its mission: Close student, faculty and staff interaction in support of intellectual growth and personal development

43 Why do students leave college? Isolation Inability to connect with significant members of the campus community….

44 A sense of belongingness can really make a difference. BSC student

45 Myths about Attrition Drop outs are flunk outs

46 Less than 25% of students leave college because they are academically ineligible to continue. Tinto, 1987, 1993

47 Myths about Attrition Drop outs are flunk outs Pre-college attributes are primary determinants of persistence or withdrawal

48 What happens to students after they enroll frequently has a more powerful impact on whether they stay and achieve their goals or leave. Astin; Tinto; Pascarelli & Terenzini

49 Talking About Leaving 40% leave engineering 50% leave biological sciences 60% leave mathematics Why undergraduates leave the sciences E. Seymour & N. Hewitt, 1997

50 Talking About Leaving Students with 650+ Math SATs 40% leave engineering 50% leave biological sciences 60% leave mathematics Why undergraduates leave the sciences E. Seymour & N. Hewitt, 1997

51 Transforming Students Through Validation Success appears to be contingent on whether [faculty and staff] can validate students in an academic or interpersonal way. Dr. Laura Rendon, 1994

52 Myths about Attrition Drop outs are flunk outs Pre-college attributes are primary determinants of persistence or withdrawal Financial issues are the major cause of departure

53 When students cite financial reasons for leaving, it is another way of stating their view that the benefits of attendance do not outweigh the costs. Conversely, when students are satisfied with their educational experiences, they often are willing to accept considerable hardship in order to attend.

54 Myths about Attrition Drop outs are flunk outs Pre-college attributes are primary determinants of persistence or withdrawal Financial issues are the major cause of departure Retention is a student affairs responsibility.

55 ALL aspects of campus life can have an impact on persistence or attrition decisions and behaviors. Promoting student persistence requires an institution-wide commitment.

56 TRIAD FOR STUDENT SUCCESS High Quality Teaching Comprehensive Support Programs Developmental Advising Program

57 I assumed the that the most important and memorable academic learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true. When we asked students to think of a specific critical incident or moment that had changed them profoundly, four-fifths of them chose a situation or event outside the classroom. Making the Most of College Richard Light, Harvard University, 2001

58 2009 National Student Satisfaction Report Conducted by Noel-Levitz, Inc. 84,638 public university students responded What do students expect from their colleges? 7= Very Important1= not important

59 National Student Satisfaction Report Four-year Public Institutions Academic advising (6.35) Instructional effectiveness (6.33) Safety and security (6.32) Registration effectiveness (6.21) Recruitment and financial aid (6.16) Concern for the individual (6.13) Campus climate (6.12) Student centeredness (6.11) Campus support services (6.07)

60 Experience is the hallmark of a Lyndon education, linking theory and practice, both inside and outside the classroom.

61 Effective enrollment management is necessary to manage enrollment pressures and employ effective retention strategies. Universities will need to augment tuition with other [revenue] sources…. Leading The Way: Pennsylvania State System Strategic Plan, (pg.3)

62 Financial Costs of Attrition at Compass U Assumptions · FTE First-year class 745 · Annual Tuition & Fees$8900 ·State Appropriation per FTE$5200 · First to second year attrition rate 30% · Second to third year attrition rate 20% Attrition Rate Lost Years Lost Students RemainingRevenue First to Second 30% 224 4$12,633,600 Year Second to Third 20% 104 3$4,399,200 Year Total Lost Revenue$17,032,800

63 A conservative estimate of loss-- Does not include lost revenue from: Room, board, books, and other expenditures Recruitment and re-recruitment costs ($500 +/- per student) Adverse impact of students leaving on future enrollments of family, friends, and others

64 THREE PERCENT (3%) INCREASE IN RETENTION Assumptions · FTE First-year class 745 · Annual Tuition & Fees$8900 · State Appropriation per FTE$5200 · First to second year attrition rate 27% · Second to third year attrition rate 17% Attrition Rate Lost Years Lost Additional Students RemainingRevenue Revenue First to Second 27%201 (+23) 4$11,336,400 1,297,200 Year Second to Third 17% 93 (+11) 3$3,933, ,300 Year Additional Revenue$1,762,500

65 FIVE PERCENT (5%) INCREASE IN RETENTION Assumptions · FTE First-year class 745 · Annual Tuition & Fees$8900 · State Appropriation per FTE$5200 · First to second year attrition rate 25% · Second to third year attrition rate 15% Attrition Rate Lost Years Lost Additional Students RemainingRevenue Revenue First to Second 25% 186 (+38) 4 $10,490,400 2,143,200 Year Second to Third 15% 85 (+19) 3 $3,595, ,700 Year Additional Revenue$2,956,900

66 The loss of potential graduates adds up to a problem of central importance to our education system, economy, and society- at-large. We cannot afford to waste the aspirations of countless young Americans. One Step From the Finish Line The Education Trust, January 2005

67 Pathways to Persistence: A Simulation Exercise

68 ASSESSMENTS You get the results of your English and Math assessments and you discover...

69 COURSE SELECTION As you begin to think about selecting your first-term courses, you find out...

70 COURSE AVAILABILITY When you go to register for classes, you find…

71 CHOICE OF MAJOR Midway through the first term, your thinking about your chosen major is...

72 ACADEMIC PROGRESS During the middle of your first term...

73 FACULTY ATTITUDES Following a class, you approach the professor to ask a question about an assignment, and the professor...

74 QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION At the end of the first term, before you get your grades, you feel the quality of instruction...

75 DIFFICULTY OF COURSES At the end of the first term, your feelings about the difficulty of your courses is...

76 PERSONAL FINANCES The following describes the status of your personal finances...

77 ROOMMATE RELATIONSHIP You live in a residence hall and your roommate…

78 RESIDENCE HALL ACTIVITIES You live in a residence hall and have found that activities for residents...

79 RESIDENCE HALL RULES & REGULATIONS Your residence hall has a policy on room visitation by the opposite sex and...

80 STUDENT EMPLOYMENT You decide to look for a job to supplement your finances and...

81 SUPPORT STAFF ATTITUDES Your perception of the attitudes of support staff at this university is…

82 SUPPORT STAFF RESPONSIVENESS The last time you went to an office to ask a simple question...

83 CONTACTS WITH HOME Last night you called home and...

84 STUDENT ACTIVITIES You were looking forward to joining a particular on-campus club and...

85 SOCIAL LIFE Looking back on your social life during the first term...

86 Sum the Scores = = = -3

87 ORIGINAL COMMITMENT SCORES for Entering Student Profiles Student ID # Original Commitment Score

88 Group Discussion On the basis of your entering profile and incident outcomes, would you be likely to return to Compass University? If so, why? If not, why not? What incident had the strongest negative impact? Why was it so negative for you? What could a faculty member, an advisor, or a staff person have done to reduce this negative impact?

89 SIMULATION OBJECTIVES Illustrates that the decision to withdraw is usually a complex process involving a series of events which occur over time, rather than a decision resulting from a single event at one point in time.

90 SIMULATION OBJECTIVES Illustrates that student characteristics (profiles) combine with institutional experiences (incidents) to shape a students decision to persist or withdraw.

91 SIMULATION OBJECTIVES Illustrates that similar experiences and events affect students differently and that we can respond to students and their needs if we come to know them from our interactions with them--in class, in advising meetings--by paying attention to small encounters.

92 We demonstrate concern for students through what we do and how we are as we interact with them.

93 Demonstrate concern for students through our actions. Manage moments of truth. Act as if small encounters matter because they often do. James Black University of North Carolina Greensboro

94 SIMULATION OBJECTIVES Illustrates that ALL aspects of campus life can have an impact on persistence or attrition decisions and behaviors.

95 Sustained institution-level change supporting increased student success and retention requires on-going collaboration from across the collegeincluding executive leadership and students…. Assumptions Project Compass

96 Our work has demonstrated that each person has an important role to play in the success of each of our students. LSC Project Compass Proposal

97 Tintos Theory of Student Departure

98 SIMULATION OBJECTIVES Illustrates that careful interventions by individuals and/or specifically designed programs can have a positive influence on students social and academic integration and, subsequently, on their persistence behaviors.

99 SIMULATION OBJECTIVES To encourage and promote an institutional dialogue about collaborations that can enhance programs, services, attitudes and behaviors that can enhance student satisfaction, achievement, and persistence.

100 At Lyndon, everyone is dedicated to a single, shared goalthe success of each and every individual student. You will find that the minute you enroll at Lyndon, everyone here will be committed to YOU. A Welcome from President Carol Moore

101 Poor outcomes will continue unless the University changes to become an in stitution which is culturally responsive to Native American students. UMPI Project Compass Proposal

102 Institutions cant change. Institutional/organizational change happens only when individuals take the initiative to create change in their areas of responsibility. Peter Senge, MIT Center for Organizational Learning

103 We need to be the change we want to see happen. M. Gandhi

104 Vision Provides a bridge between where we are today and where we want to be.

105 Most missions and visions never become reality because people usually underestimate the amount of time, energy and commitment that are required to make a vision real. Peter Senge, MIT Center for Organizational Learning The Fifth Discipline

106 The biggest and longest lasting reform in undergraduate education will come when individuals and small groups adopt the view of themselves as reformers in their immediate spheres of influence. K. Patricia Cross 2004

107 Pathways to Persistence Compass Project Learning Community Meeting April 13, 2010 Thomas Brown


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