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Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions Presentation to the American Trails Symposium Chattanooga, TN November 16, 2010 John Morton –

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Presentation on theme: "Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions Presentation to the American Trails Symposium Chattanooga, TN November 16, 2010 John Morton –"— Presentation transcript:

1 Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions Presentation to the American Trails Symposium Chattanooga, TN November 16, 2010 John Morton – David Lindahl –

2 2 Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions I.Why Host an Event? II.Types of Events and Activities III.Elements of a Successful Event IV.Planning the Venue Elements of a Good Start/Finish Area Elements of Sound Trail Planning and Design V.Some Examples Thetford Academy – High School Cross Country Running Trapp Family Lodge – NCAA Ski Championships and Relay For Life Pineland Farms – Running and Cyclocross Aroostook County, ME – World Cup Biathlon

3 3 Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions I.Why Host an Event? II.Types of Events and Activities III.Elements of a Successful Event IV.Planning the Venue Elements of a Good Start/Finish Area Elements of Sound Trail Planning and Design V.Some Examples Thetford Academy – High School Cross Country Running Trapp Family Lodge – NCAA Ski Championships and Relay For Life Pineland Farms – Running and Cyclocross Aroostook County, ME – World Cup Biathlon

4 4 Why Host an Event? Direct Financial Returns User Fees On-Site Sales F&B, Concession, Retail Corporate Sponsorships Other Economic Impacts Hotel and Lodging Nearby Food, Fuel, and Other Businesses Indirect (Multiplier) Impacts Marketing Benefits Strengthened Identity and Brand Establish Reputation as a Vibrant Active Location Indirect Advertising (PR) Other Benefits Community Goodwill Enhanced Relations with Adjacent Landowners Promote Active, Healthy, Outdoor Lifestyles in a Social Setting Benefits of Hosting an Event

5 5 Event Financial Returns Small Events (for example a 200 participant benefit walk) Net to the organization of $0 - $10,000 Medium Events (i.e., a 500 competitor mountain bike race) Net of $6,000 - $40,000 Large Events (a Running or Ski Marathon of 5,000) Up to $1,000,000 in revenues; +/-$100,000 in profits Affiliated Businesses 5-30% increase in seasonal hotel occupancy and ADR 20-30% increase in F&B, retail and concessions

6 6 Other Benefits

7 7 Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions I.Why Host an Event? II.Types of Events and Activities III.Elements of a Successful Event IV.Planning the Venue Elements of a Good Start/Finish Area Elements of Sound Trail Planning and Design V.Some Examples Thetford Academy – High School Cross Country Running Trapp Family Lodge – NCAA Ski Championships and Relay For Life Pineland Farms – Running and Cyclocross Aroostook County, ME – World Cup Biathlon

8 8 Types of Events – From the Modest...

9 9 … To the Large Start of the American Birkebeiner 55 Kilometer XC Ski Race – Hayward, Wisconsin Over 6,000 Participants

10 10 Adaptive Trail-Based Sports are Growing Fast With Exciting New Sources of Funding

11 11 Events are Characterized by Type of Activity and Level World Cup National Championships Marathon or Major Benefit Event Collegiate or High School Championships Local Charity Fundraiser Tuesday Evening Fun Events Trail/XC Running Snowshoeing Cyclocross XC Skiing Triathlon Orienteering Mountain Biking LEVEL OF INTENSITY TYPE OF ACTIVITY

12 12 Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions I.Why Host an Event? II.Types of Events and Activities III.Elements of a Successful Event IV.Planning the Venue Elements of a Good Start/Finish Area Elements of Sound Trail Planning and Design V.Some Examples Thetford Academy – High School Cross Country Running Trapp Family Lodge – NCAA Ski Championships and Relay For Life Pineland Farms – Running and Cyclocross Aroostook County, ME – World Cup Biathlon

13 13 Many Elements to Planning a Successful Event Volunteers Parking Bathrooms Registration Signs Awards Sponsors Marketing Food Police First Aid Results Trails and Venue

14 14 A Dedicated Group of People

15 15 Temporary Facilities Can Serve Almost Any Need

16 16 A Critical Element of a Successful Event Volunteers Parking Bathrooms Registration Signs Awards Sponsors Marketing Food Police First Aid Results Trails and Venue

17 17 Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions I.Why Host an Event? II.Types of Events and Activities III.Elements of a Successful Event IV.Planning the Venue Elements of a Good Start/Finish Area Elements of Sound Trail Planning and Design V.Some Examples Thetford Academy – High School Cross Country Running Trapp Family Lodge – NCAA Ski Championships and Relay For Life Pineland Farms – Running and Cyclocross Aroostook County, ME – World Cup Biathlon

18 18 Elements of a Good Start/Finish Area Adequate Space Convenient Access for Athletes Premium Viewing Areas for Spectators Use of Temporary Facilities Location for Awards Presentation Other Requirements (i.e., Media, VIP, Doping Control) Alternative Uses – e.g., Concerts, Weddings, etc.

19 19 Elements of a Good Start/Finish Area

20 20 Start/Finish

21 21 Elements of Successful Trail Design for Events Make the courses fun, safe, and appropriate to the skill level of the participants Configure the course to maximize spectator interest Multiple places to see the event at exciting locations Access to the course without interfering with the event Provide variation in terrain, elevation, and features Separate event trails from recreational users Provide an exciting point near the finish

22 22 Trail Design – Clover Leaf Loops for Maximum Spectator Interest

23 23 Trail Design – Nested Loops for Flexibility and Multiple Laps

24 24 Point to Point Trails – Can be a Signature Event but Pose Logistical Challenges

25 Canadian Ski Marathon

26 26 Trails – Make the Course Fun and Interesting

27 27 Incorporate Uphills, Technical Descents, or Exciting Elements Near the Finish A Good Course Profile

28 28 High Level Events – Governing Bodies Dictating Design and Logistics Sport/EventGoverning BodyIssues XC High School and Collegiate Running USA Track and FieldStart and finish width; general guidelines on surface and terrain CyclocrossUnion Cycliste Internationale (UCI) Min. course width (3M); 90% rideable; types, number, and location of barriers XC SkiingInternational Ski Federation (FIS) and United States Ski and Snowboarding (USSA) Homologation including required climbs, width (4M up to 9M), parking, stadium, TV Mountain BikingUSA Cycling, NORBA, and UCI Various rules of course terrain, features, rideability depending on event and skill level OrienteeringInternational Orienteering Federation (IOF) Four sports: foot, mountain bike, ski, and trail each with different requirements/guidelines

29 29 Planning and Designing Trails for Events and Competitions I.Why Host an Event? II.Types of Events and Activities III.Elements of a Successful Event IV.Planning the Venue Elements of a Good Start/Finish Area Elements of Sound Trail Planning and Design V.Some Examples Thetford Academy – High School Cross Country Running Trapp Family Lodge – NCAA Ski Championships and Relay For Life Pineland Farms – Running and Cyclocross Aroostook County, ME – World Cup Biathlon

30 30 Thetford Academy – Vermonts Oldest Secondary School

31 31 Thetford Academy – On Your Marks…

32 32 Thetford Academy – The Start

33 33 Thetford, VT – Pop. 2,800 Since 1990, hosts 2-3 events per year: Woods Trail Run – 2,600 runners + 2,000 spectators VT State High School XC Running Championships New England Championships – Every 5 Years More Than 100 Community Volunteers (even on opening day of hunting season) Financial Returns (1 Event) Income: Entry Fees:$8,597 T-Shirt Sales$15,673 $24,270 Expenses: Landscape Services$390 Timing$2,600 Toilets$1,245 T-Shirts$9,803 Other$2,525 $16,563 NET INCOME$7,707 Thetford Academy

34 34 Thetford Academy - Spectators are an Important Part of the Trail and Venue Design

35

36 36 Trapp Family – The Movie…

37 37 … and the Real Story

38

39

40 40 Hosts Over 20 Large and Small Events Annually Major Collegiate and HS Races 2011 NCAA XC Ski Championships Venue Used for 4 major Concert Series in Summer American Cancer Relay for Life - $100,000 raised 2010 – Poor Winter for Snow – Most Successful Financial Season at Nordic Center (High Six Figure Gross; 40% Profit Margin) Events Have Significantly Increased Hotel and Restaurant Revenue; Fractional Ownership Villas Now 95% Sold Trapp Family Lodge Events

41 41 Pineland Farms, New Gloucester, Maine 30 minutes from Portland, Maine – Metropolitan Area Pop. 513,012 Trails designed for recreational, site employees, and hosting events Small events to 700-competitor Pineland Farms Trail Challenge – 50 miles Do not organize events but charge head fee + other services (e.g., mowing)

42 42 Pineland Farms – Cyclocross 345 racers – two-day stage race Next year – 450 racers Short and Technical Course $4,000 - $5,000 gross – structure is to charge a per head fee to race organizers

43 43 Ft. Kent Presque Isle Aroostook County, Maine

44 44 Competition and Events – Aroostook County County Population – 71,000 over 6,700 sq. miles (equal to CT + RI) 2011 – Two World Cups at Ft. Kent and Presque Isle, February ,000 volunteers 35,000 spectators 120 million TV viewers over 7 days Anticipated $8M Economic Impact in Aroostook County New Website to Promote International Tourism:

45 45 A Well-Planned Event Makes Everyone a Winner

46 For further information: John Morton - David Lindahl Old Strong Road Thetford Center, VT (802)


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