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IMac Basics This PowerPoint covers the following: Running XP in different modes through Parallels Running XP in different modes through Parallels Drag.

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Presentation on theme: "IMac Basics This PowerPoint covers the following: Running XP in different modes through Parallels Running XP in different modes through Parallels Drag."— Presentation transcript:

1 iMac Basics This PowerPoint covers the following: Running XP in different modes through Parallels Running XP in different modes through Parallels Drag and Drop from one OS to Another Drag and Drop from one OS to Another Saving to your Network Folder Saving to your Network Folder Using a Flash Drive with STI TakeHome Using a Flash Drive with STI TakeHome Using your iMac with a Projector Using your iMac with a Projector Using your iMac with a Second Monitor Using your iMac with a Second Monitor Installing a Printer on the iMac Installing a Printer on the iMac Burning a CD on the iMac Burning a CD on the iMac Logging On and Off and Switching Users Logging On and Off and Switching Users Closing Windows and Quitting Applications Closing Windows and Quitting Applications Widgets Widgets

2 Parallels When using Windows XP through the Parallels software on your iMac, you have the option of running XP in three different modes: When using Windows XP through the Parallels software on your iMac, you have the option of running XP in three different modes: Full Screen Full Screen OS Window OS Window Coherence Coherence

3 Parallels Full Screen Mode Full Screen Mode When ran in full screen mode, your iMac computer essentially looks and acts like a typical windows computer. When ran in full screen mode, your iMac computer essentially looks and acts like a typical windows computer. However, the Macintosh OS X operating system is actually still running behind the Windows operating system. However, the Macintosh OS X operating system is actually still running behind the Windows operating system. Most iMacs are set to start XP in full screen mode automatically. Most iMacs are set to start XP in full screen mode automatically.

4 Parallels OS Window Mode OS Window Mode OS Window Mode allows you to run XP within a window on your Mac OS X operating system. OS Window Mode allows you to run XP within a window on your Mac OS X operating system.

5 Parallels OS Window Mode OS Window Mode The OS Window can be made to make up the majority of the screen by clicking the green maximize button in the top left-hand corner of the window. The OS Window can be made to make up the majority of the screen by clicking the green maximize button in the top left-hand corner of the window.

6 Parallels OS Window Mode OS Window Mode The OS Window can be resized to any size you like by dragging the small grey triangle in the bottom left-hand corner of the OS Window. The OS Window can be resized to any size you like by dragging the small grey triangle in the bottom left-hand corner of the OS Window.

7 Parallels OS Window Mode OS Window Mode XP can also be minimized to the dock using the yellow minimize button. XP can also be minimized to the dock using the yellow minimize button.

8 Parallels Coherence Mode Coherence Mode Coherence Mode should be used by users who are comfortable with and prefer the Mac OS X operating system, but still need access to some XP programs. Coherence Mode should be used by users who are comfortable with and prefer the Mac OS X operating system, but still need access to some XP programs. Coherence Mode makes the Windows Start Menu accessible from Mac OS X, allowing users to run Windows programs in the Mac OS X environment. Coherence Mode makes the Windows Start Menu accessible from Mac OS X, allowing users to run Windows programs in the Mac OS X environment.

9 Parallels Coherence Mode Coherence Mode

10 Parallels Switching Between Modes Switching Between Modes Users can easily switch between Full Screen Mode, OS Window Mode, and Coherence Mode. Users can easily switch between Full Screen Mode, OS Window Mode, and Coherence Mode. This can be done in a couple different ways. This can be done in a couple different ways. First, to exit from Full Screen Mode and switch to OS Window Mode, hold down the ALT key and hit RETURN. First, to exit from Full Screen Mode and switch to OS Window Mode, hold down the ALT key and hit RETURN.

11 Parallels Switching Between Modes Switching Between Modes Users can switch between different modes through the Parallels Desktop menu. Click on View, then select the mode you would like to switch to. Users can switch between different modes through the Parallels Desktop menu. Click on View, then select the mode you would like to switch to.

12 Parallels Switching Between Modes Switching Between Modes Users can also switch between modes using the buttons on the right in OS Window Mode. Users can also switch between modes using the buttons on the right in OS Window Mode. Full Screen Mode Coherence Mode OS Window Mode

13 Parallels Drag and Drop from one OS to Another Drag and Drop from one OS to Another From OS Window Mode, resize the XP window so that part of the Mac OS X desktop can be seen. From OS Window Mode, resize the XP window so that part of the Mac OS X desktop can be seen. You can now copy files from one operating system to the other by simply clicking and dragging from one desktop to the other. You can now copy files from one operating system to the other by simply clicking and dragging from one desktop to the other. Note that copies the file from one operating system to the other, leaving the original files in place. It does not move the files from one operating system to the other. Note that copies the file from one operating system to the other, leaving the original files in place. It does not move the files from one operating system to the other.

14 Parallels Parallels Shared Folder Parallels Shared Folder Shared folders are folders in the Mac OS X system that are also available in XP. These folders can be used for exchanging files between Mac OS X and XP. Shared folders are folders in the Mac OS X system that are also available in XP. These folders can be used for exchanging files between Mac OS X and XP. For example, a user could create a folder in the Mac OS X system on the desktop and call it My Documents. They could then make this folder available as a Parallels Shared Folder and files placed in this folder would be accessible in both operating systems. For example, a user could create a folder in the Mac OS X system on the desktop and call it My Documents. They could then make this folder available as a Parallels Shared Folder and files placed in this folder would be accessible in both operating systems.

15 Saving to Your Network Folder It is a good practice to always save your files to your network folder rather than on your computer. It is a good practice to always save your files to your network folder rather than on your computer. In general, server hard drives are more reliable than workstation hard drives. In general, server hard drives are more reliable than workstation hard drives. Also, because XP is running virtually on the iMac, if the virtual installation becomes corrupt, it may be impossible to recover your files. Also, because XP is running virtually on the iMac, if the virtual installation becomes corrupt, it may be impossible to recover your files. Planning is underway to purchase a file server that has backup hardware built into it so that if a server hard drive fails, the information stored on this hard drive can easily be recovered by simply replacing the hard drive and allowing the backup system to rebuild it. Planning is underway to purchase a file server that has backup hardware built into it so that if a server hard drive fails, the information stored on this hard drive can easily be recovered by simply replacing the hard drive and allowing the backup system to rebuild it.

16 Saving to Your Network Folder You can create a shortcut to your network folder on your desktop by taking the following steps: You can create a shortcut to your network folder on your desktop by taking the following steps: –Right-click on a blank area of the XP desktop, point to New, and click Shortcut. –Click Browse –Click the + signs next to My Network Places, Entire Network, Microsoft Windows Network, Jenkins, E276011PFB01. –Click on your name and click OK. –Click Next. –Click Finished. You now have a shortcut on your desktop to your network folder. You now have a shortcut on your desktop to your network folder.

17 Using a Flash Drive with STI TakeHome To use your flash drive with STI TakeHome, do the following: To use your flash drive with STI TakeHome, do the following: Insert your flash drive into an available USB port on your computer or on the back of your iMac keyboard. Insert your flash drive into an available USB port on your computer or on the back of your iMac keyboard. Open My Computer. Open My Computer. Look to see what drive letter has been assigned to your flash drive. This will typically be the next available drive letter. Look to see what drive letter has been assigned to your flash drive. This will typically be the next available drive letter.

18 Using a Flash Drive with STI TakeHome Open STIClassroom by clicking Start, All Programs, STI Applications, STIClassroom. Open STIClassroom by clicking Start, All Programs, STI Applications, STIClassroom. Enter your username and password. Enter your username and password. Click the TakeHome menu. Click the TakeHome menu. Click Create Take Home Diskette Click Create Take Home Diskette For Target, select Other For Target, select Other For Path, enter the drive letter that XP assigned to your flash drive. For Path, enter the drive letter that XP assigned to your flash drive. Select the grading period you would like to export, then click OK. Select the grading period you would like to export, then click OK. When you insert your flash drive in your computer at home, it may not assign the same drive letter that was used at school. Remember that XP gives the next available letter to your flash drive. When you insert your flash drive in your computer at home, it may not assign the same drive letter that was used at school. Remember that XP gives the next available letter to your flash drive.

19 iMac and Your Projector When you use your iMac with a projector, you are presented with a couple of options. You can use your projector in either Mirrored Mode or Extended Desktop Mode.

20 iMac and Your Projector Mirrored Mode takes an exact copy of what is displayed on your monitor and displays it on your projector. To select Mirrored Mode, do the following: Click the Apple Click the Apple Click System Preferences Click System Preferences Double click Displays Double click Displays Click the Arrangement tab Click the Arrangement tab Check the Mirror Displays box Check the Mirror Displays box

21 iMac and Your Projector Note that when using Mirror Displays, the resolution on your monitor may automatically change. This is because the projector supports a lower resolution than the iMac monitor and is adjusting the image so that it can be projected.

22 iMac and Your Projector You can also use your projector as an extended desktop. Using an extended desktop allows you to increase your desktop space by extending onto another display. It works as if the display on the projector were attached to the right side of your monitor. You can simply click and drag files from your desktop off the right side of your monitor and onto the left side of your projected image. You can also drag a window onto your extended desktop and maximize it so that it fills that entire display. Extended Desktop is used simply by unselecting Mirrored Display

23 iMac and a Second Monitor You have the same options with a second monitor that you do when using a projector. However, while Mirrored Display would most commonly be used with your projector, Extended Desktop would most commonly be used with a second monitor.

24 iMac and a Second Monitor

25 An advantage of using a second monitor with Parallels is that you can run Mac OS X on the primary iMac monitor and run Windows XP on the second monitor. To do this, just start XP in OS Window Mode, drag the XP window right onto the second monitor, then switch to Full Screen Mode.

26 iMac, Projector, Second Monitor To switch between using your projector and a second monitor, you have to unhook your projector from the Apple Mini DVI adapter and hook it to your second monitor.

27 Installing a Printer on the iMac To install a printer in the Mac OS X operating system, do the following: To install a printer in the Mac OS X operating system, do the following: Click the Apple Click the Apple Click System Preferences Click System Preferences Double-click Print & Fax Double-click Print & Fax Click the + sign Click the + sign

28 Select the printer you would like to install from the list. Select the printer you would like to install from the list. Printers at JMHS begin with E276011FA00 Printers at JMHS begin with E276011FA00 When selecting a printer, you can get its location from the Location: field When selecting a printer, you can get its location from the Location: field Click Add Click Add Click Continue Click Continue Installing a Printer on the iMac

29 Burning a CD on your iMac To burn a CD on your iMac, do the following: – Insert a blank CD into the drive – After a few seconds, the CD will mount on your Mac OS X desktop – If you see the following screen, select Open Finder and hit OK to mount the CD

30 Burning a CD on your iMac To burn a CD on your iMac, do the following: – Double-click the CD icon labeled Untitled CD on the desktop to open it. – Drag the files you want to burn to the CD into the window.

31 Burning a CD on your iMac To burn a CD on your iMac, do the following: – Click on Burn in the top right-hand corner to begin burning. – You can now give your CD a descriptive name in the Disc Name: field – Click Burn to finish

32 Logging On and Off and Switching Users Unlike XP, Mac OS X allows more than one user to be logged on at a time. You can see who is logged on to the computer by clicking the user name in the top right- hand corner. Unlike XP, Mac OS X allows more than one user to be logged on at a time. You can see who is logged on to the computer by clicking the user name in the top right- hand corner.

33 Logging On and Off and Switching Users The Dataseam account should always be logged on, as this is the account that runs the cancer research. The Dataseam account should always be logged on, as this is the account that runs the cancer research. While there are instances in which having multiple users logged on at the same time can be helpful, there normally should only be the Dataseam account and the current users account logged on. While there are instances in which having multiple users logged on at the same time can be helpful, there normally should only be the Dataseam account and the current users account logged on. Every account logged on uses system resources and will cause the computer to run more slowly. Every account logged on uses system resources and will cause the computer to run more slowly.

34 Logging On and Off and Switching Users It is a good practice to always lock your computer when you are away. This is done differently in XP and Mac OS X. It is a good practice to always lock your computer when you are away. This is done differently in XP and Mac OS X. To lock your computer in XP, press Control+Alt+Delete, then click Lock Computer. To lock your computer in XP, press Control+Alt+Delete, then click Lock Computer.

35 Logging On and Off and Switching Users In Mac OS X, you lock your computer by pulling the mouse to the bottom left-hand corner of the desktop. In Mac OS X, you lock your computer by pulling the mouse to the bottom left-hand corner of the desktop. This will cause the screensaver to activate, which is password protected. Simply move your mouse and the computer will ask for your password before granting access to the desktop. This will cause the screensaver to activate, which is password protected. Simply move your mouse and the computer will ask for your password before granting access to the desktop.

36 Logging On and Off and Switching Users To properly lock your computer, you should always lock your computer from the Mac OS X side. To properly lock your computer, you should always lock your computer from the Mac OS X side. If you lock you computer on the XP side only, someone could minimize the XP window and still have access to all your files, including what your have stored on the server, through Mac OS X. If you lock you computer on the XP side only, someone could minimize the XP window and still have access to all your files, including what your have stored on the server, through Mac OS X.

37 Logging On and Off and Switching Users It is best practice to completely shut down XP and lock your computer from the Mac OS X side when you are going to be away from the computer for longer amounts of time, such as overnight. It is best practice to completely shut down XP and lock your computer from the Mac OS X side when you are going to be away from the computer for longer amounts of time, such as overnight. This helps decrease the risk of things like power outages corrupting your XP installation, which could cause you to loose everything stored in XP. This helps decrease the risk of things like power outages corrupting your XP installation, which could cause you to loose everything stored in XP.

38 Closing Windows and Quitting Applications Like XP, open windows in Mac OS X have three buttons for the management of a window. Like XP, open windows in Mac OS X have three buttons for the management of a window. The management buttons for a XP window are located it the top right-hand corner. The are located in the top left-hand corner of a Mac OS X window. The management buttons for a XP window are located it the top right-hand corner. The are located in the top left-hand corner of a Mac OS X window.

39 Closing Windows and Quitting Applications While these buttons have similar functions in both operating systems, there is one notable difference. While these buttons have similar functions in both operating systems, there is one notable difference. minimize maximize close minimize maximize

40 Closing Windows and Quitting Applications When you click the X to close an application in XP, it closes both the document that you are working on and the application. When you click the X to close an application in XP, it closes both the document that you are working on and the application. In Mac OS X, the X closes the document that your are working on, but the application itself stays open. In Mac OS X, the X closes the document that your are working on, but the application itself stays open.

41 Closing Windows and Quitting Applications You can see that the application is still running by the small black triangle located directly under the icon for the application located in the dock. You can see that the application is still running by the small black triangle located directly under the icon for the application located in the dock.

42 Closing Windows and Quitting Applications To shut down the application in Mac OS X, you can click the menu for the application located at the top of the desktop and click quit. To shut down the application in Mac OS X, you can click the menu for the application located at the top of the desktop and click quit. Another way to shut down the application is to right-click the application in the dock and click Quit. Another way to shut down the application is to right-click the application in the dock and click Quit.

43 Closing Windows and Quitting Applications It is important to ensure that you properly close applications in Mac OS X when they are not in use. Open applications use system resources and can affect the computers performance. It is important to ensure that you properly close applications in Mac OS X when they are not in use. Open applications use system resources and can affect the computers performance.

44 Content Specific Widgets A widget is a small program that runs on your desktop that replaces the need to constantly visit a website in order to get common information. A widget is a small program that runs on your desktop that replaces the need to constantly visit a website in order to get common information. Mac OS X has some widgets built into the operating system. You can access these widgets by either clicking the scroll button in the middle of your mouse or by clicking the dashboard icon in the dock. Mac OS X has some widgets built into the operating system. You can access these widgets by either clicking the scroll button in the middle of your mouse or by clicking the dashboard icon in the dock.

45 Content Specific Widgets When you open the Dashboard to access the widgets, you will see some by default, such as the time and a calendar. When you open the Dashboard to access the widgets, you will see some by default, such as the time and a calendar. You can access additional widgets by clicking the + in the bottom right-hand corner of the desktop. You can access additional widgets by clicking the + in the bottom right-hand corner of the desktop.

46 Content Specific Widgets There are some powerful educational widgets built into Mac OS X. There are some powerful educational widgets built into Mac OS X. There is a dictionary/thesaurus widget, unit converter widget, translation widget, and calculator widget. There is a dictionary/thesaurus widget, unit converter widget, translation widget, and calculator widget.

47 Content Specific Widgets There are hundreds of downloadable widgets available online. There are hundreds of downloadable widgets available online. While most of these are not appropriate for the educational setting, there are widgets that are suitable for the classroom. While most of these are not appropriate for the educational setting, there are widgets that are suitable for the classroom. Widgets can be accessed at Widgets can be accessed at

48 Content Specific Widgets You can also access widgets online by opening the Dashboard, clicking Manage Widgets…, and clicking More Widgets… You can also access widgets online by opening the Dashboard, clicking Manage Widgets…, and clicking More Widgets…


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