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© Boardworks Ltd 2005 1 of 16 These icons indicate that teachers notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates that.

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Presentation on theme: "© Boardworks Ltd 2005 1 of 16 These icons indicate that teachers notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates that."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 1 of 16 These icons indicate that teachers notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates that the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. © Boardworks Ltd 2005 1 of 16 Textiles Finishing Processes

2 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 2 of 16 Learning objectives © Boardworks Ltd 2005 2 of 16 Learning objectives To understand what finishing processes are, and the differences between physical, chemical and biological processes. To understand how these processes can alter the properties of a fabric. To consider the benefits different finishing processes offer.

3 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 3 of 16 Finishing processes are usually applied to fabric before it is manufactured into products. The processes can change or alter a number of the fabrics properties, including its feel, durability and appearance. Processes can be physical, chemical or biological. A number of new finishes are also being developed. What are finishing processes? What finishing processes do you think might have been applied to these items?

4 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 4 of 16 What do you know?

5 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 5 of 16 Embossing is a process that is applied to synthetic fabrics. The fabric passes through two rollers which have a pattern engraved on the surface. The rollers are heated and the pattern is melted into the fabric. There are many physical finishes that are used for furnishings, specialist clothing and patterned fabric. Physical finishes

6 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 6 of 16 Brushing can be applied to natural and man-made fabrics, e.g. wool, cotton and polyester. The fabric is passed between a number of rollers which have tiny wires on the surface. These wires brush the fabric and leave it fluffy. This process is popular for bedding and fleece outerwear. Physical finishes

7 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 7 of 16 Laminating joins layers of fabrics together using adhesive or heat. The process can be applied to cotton and polyester and produces an enhanced fabric with more properties. Calendaring is similar to embossing but the heated rollers are smooth. This leaves a shiny and smooth finish on the fabric. A laser draws decorative patterns onto natural or man- made fabrics. Physical finishes

8 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 8 of 16 Anti-felting is a finish that is applied to wool. It can either be applied by a synthetic polymer coating or an oxidative finish. Both of these processes soften the wool. There are a large number of chemical finishes that are used for clothing, furnishings, bedding, hard and soft furnishing and outdoor products. Bleaching is a process which removes the natural colour of wools, linens and cottons. Chemical finishes

9 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 9 of 16 Flame proofing can be applied to a number of different fabrics. The process is either applied to a yarn or fabric. It will slow down the burning process but not stop burning completely. Waterproofing is applied at the fabric stage. A silicone based chemical coats the fabric, leaving a waterproof layer. To make fabric stain resistant a silicone based chemical is applied to the fabric, which stops stains from penetrating the fabric. Chemical finishes

10 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 10 of 16 Biostoning is an alternative to using a pumice on fabric, and the process takes place after the fabric has been dyed. Cellulose enzymes attack the cellulose already in the fibre, giving denim a faded look. Biopolishing takes place before the fabric is dyed. A biological enzyme is added to the fabric, giving it a sheen. There are currently two biological finishes that are added to fibres and fabrics. These processes can be applied to cotton and tencel, both of which are mainly used for clothes. Biological finishes

11 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 11 of 16 What have you learned?

12 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 12 of 16 Fire resistant fabrics can withstand extreme fire conditions, and are more effective than flame proofed materials. Fibres can now be treated so they are fire retardant before they are made into fabrics. This ensures protection from both flames and extreme heat and makes makes the fabric difficult to light and burn. New finishes are being invented and developed all the time, allowing textiles to be used in an increasing variety of situations. New finishes

13 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 13 of 16 Thermal insulation is a process which keeps people warm by regulating the temperature. Chemical protection stops the penetration of any chemicals that may be in the atmosphere. Membrane systems absorb liquids like perspiration and disperse them into the atmosphere. The membranes are constructed so that liquid is not allowed back through. New finishes

14 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 14 of 16 Tear and cut resistance is a finish that is applied to fabrics which stops the penetration of knives. It also stops fabrics from tearing. Abrasion resistance is the process that prevents fabrics from deterioration caused by constant wear and tear. A reflective finish is achieved by inks applied to fibres and yarns to produce a HV (high visibility) finish. Antibacterial processed fabrics can wick away moisture (sweat) and even help the healing process. New finishes What practical applications do you think these finishes might have?

15 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 15 of 16 What finish do I need?

16 © Boardworks Ltd 2005 16 of 16 Key points © Boardworks Ltd 2005 16 of 16 Key points Finishing processes alter the properties of fabrics, allowing them new uses. Physical processes, such as embossing and brushing, mechanically alter the surface of the fabric. Chemical finishes, such as waterproofing and bleaching, coat the fabric or chemically add or remove something (for example, the colour) from the fabric. Biostoning and biopolishing are both biological finishes in which enzymes attack the fabric. New finishes have produced fire, abrasion and chemical resistant fabrics. Additional finishes are continually being developed.


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