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Laura David, Roselle Borja, UPMSI ML San Diego-McGlone, Ph.D. Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptability Assessment Tools Faith Varona, TAO-Pilipinas.

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Presentation on theme: "Laura David, Roselle Borja, UPMSI ML San Diego-McGlone, Ph.D. Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptability Assessment Tools Faith Varona, TAO-Pilipinas."— Presentation transcript:

1 Laura David, Roselle Borja, UPMSI ML San Diego-McGlone, Ph.D. Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptability Assessment Tools Faith Varona, TAO-Pilipinas Mike Atrigenio Adopted from L. Davids and P. Alinos Presentations UP Marine Science Institute

2 The COASTAL ZONE Is the interface between land, sea and atmosphere. It contains natural systems that provide more than half of the global ecosystem goods (e.g., fish, oil, minerals) and services (e.g., natural protection from storms and tidal waves, recreation). In addition, 14 of the worlds 17 largest megacities are located along coasts and most of them (11) are located in Asias fastest growing economies.

3 Dynamic Environment – Changing Space through Time : Daily changes with TIDE Seasonal changes with STORMS Long-term changes - sediment transport F. Siringan

4 So when we talk about Climate Change effects to the coasts we are talking about changes that affect the the frequency and intensity of these natural cycles or changes beyond these natural cycles More intense storms due to increased SST Sea Level Rise

5 When we talk about Climate Change effects to the coasts we are also talking about Impacts to system function that have consequence to human activities:

6 The problem of climate change is the increase in frequency of bleaching events which do not allow for RECOVERY TIME with just a 0.3C increase per decade the number of bleaching incidents are expected to almost double

7 Examples on impact to coastal resources: increase in ocean temperature leads to coral bleaching Eroded reef/ low diversity/ less fish Reef/ healthy cover/ more fish

8 Photos: Mike Atrigenio

9 Sutherst 2000 Heliopora

10 Hoegh-Guldberg et al. 2007

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12 Response of reefs to sea level rise Source: Lecture 8 of MS 230 course, Dr. F.P. Siringan

13 Loss of Reef Spells more coastal erosion Aside from providing habitat for fish a Healthy Reef also acts as barrier

14 damaged by a strong typhoon leaving behind half concrete walls, floor slabs and a septic vault Coastal Erosion leads to these familiar faces of climate related disasters Other barriers such as a seawall can be put up to replace damaged reefs however, the current cost estimate of building a seawall is about 39.2 M PhP/km

15 Biodiversity Zonation MiddleSeaward Landward Laura T. David and Maricar Samson With seedlings being more susceptible THUS ALSO AFFECTING BIODIVERSITY

16 All this will affect

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18 Adaptive Management through (MEMES) Motivating Ecosystem Management Enhancement Strategy Melbourne-Thomas et al. 2010

19 Maintaining Coastal Integrity And Equitable Access R estoring coastal protection E ffective erosion buffers S ustaining coastal integrity T hresholds maintained within acceptable limits vis-a-vis coastal erosion, sedimentation and thermal anomalies O rganizing coastwatch R educing threats and sharing costs E nhancing equitable access D isaster risk reduction

20 LUZON South China Sea (B) North Philippine Sea (A-1) Sulu Sea (C) Visayan Seas (D) Celebes Sea (E) South Philippine Sea (A-2) SST and coral bleaching needs MPA network resiliency system Maintaining coastal integrity amidst extreme weather events Managing fisheries in ENSO & La Nina regimes Reducing siltation from high precipitation SLR zoning adjustments Sustaining Resilient Knowledge-Based Communities The STEWARDS CAN Partnership: Seeing a Sea Change Understanding and adapting wisely Pressures, State and Responses Baseline profiling & vulnerability assessment

21 accelerate Protecting 10% of the coral reefs in the Philippines would take 100 years: accelerate the area covered and improve its effectiveness

22 MPA Management Effectiveness Assessment Tool (MPA MEAT) Based on Philippine experience on MPAs Evidence-based Use of thresholds, scores, and management focus Scores = amount of effort Levels = important factors towards effective management

23 Why Form MPA Networks? Existing connectivity among ecosystems at various scales: benefits from natural networks need to be sustained Single MPAs may not be enough for protection at larger scales.

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25 25 Sample Benefits Derived from Inter-LGU Collaboration (Cost for CLE operations per square kilometer of municipal waters) Individual LGUs enforcing their respective municipal waters (effective enforcement up to 5 kilometers) Inter-LGU Coastal Resource Management with joint enforcement (effective enforcement up to 10 kilometers) LGU 1 PhP LGU 2 PhP 2, LGU 3 PhP LGU 4 PhP 12, LGU 5 PhP LGU 1 PhP LGU 2 PhP 1, LGU 3 PhP LGU 4 PhP 6, LGU 5 PhP The Philippine Environmental Governance 2 Project Fish Biomass

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