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Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning How to write an international marketing plan Internationalisation of the firm Chapter.

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Presentation on theme: "Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning How to write an international marketing plan Internationalisation of the firm Chapter."— Presentation transcript:

1 Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning How to write an international marketing plan Internationalisation of the firm Chapter 8: Organisation and logistics

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4 Export Planning Learning objectives (learning tasks)Ch. 8 At the end of the chapter you are able to: 1.develop the logistics structure and distribution set up; 2.determine the delivery – and payment terms and export documents requirements; 3.create the necessary organisation structure set up; 4.identify cultural issues and resource requirements;

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6 Export Planning Supply Chain / Logistics infrastructure set up Source: Supply Chain Council The development of a fast, flexible and cost efficient supply chain network requires the set-up of : 1.a physical supply chain infrastructure (to create a pipeline) 2.an IT-systems network to have a smooth flow within the pipeline

7 Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning SCOR model Source: Supply Chain Council

8 Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning SCOR model Source: Supply Chain Council

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14 Export Planning Delivery terms EXW (Ex Works) Seller fulfills the obligation to deliver when he or she has made the goods available at his/her premises (i.e., works, factory, warehouse, etc.) to the buyer. In particular, the seller is not responsible for loading the goods in the vehicle provided by the buyer or for clearing the goods for export, unless otherwise agreed. The buyer bears all costs and risks involved in taking the goods from the seller's premises to the desired destination. This term thus represents the minimum obligation for the seller. FCA (Free Carrier) Seller fulfills their obligation when he or she has handed over the goods, cleared for export, into the charge of the carrier named by the buyer at the named place or point. If no precise point is indicated by the buyer, the seller may choose, within the place or range stipulated, where the carrier should take the goods into their charge. FAS (Free Alongside Ship) Seller fulfills his obligation to deliver when the goods have been placed alongside the vessel on the quay or in lighters at the named port of shipment. This means that the buyer has to bear all costs and risks of loss of or damage to the goods from that moment. FOB (Free On Board) Seller fulfills his or her obligation to deliver when the goods have passed over the ship's rail at the named port of shipment. This means that the buyer has to bear all costs and risks to loss of or damage to the goods from that point. The FOB term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. Sourcce: www. Exporters.com.sg

15 Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning Delivery terms CFR (Cost and Freight) Seller pays the costs and freight necessary to bring the goods to the named port of destination, Terms of Sale but the risk of loss of or damage to the goods, as (continued) well as any additional costs due to events occurring after the time the goods have been delivered on board the vessel, is transferred from the seller to the buyer when the goods pass the ship's rail in the port of shipment. The CFR term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. CIF (Cost, Insurance and Freight) Seller has the same obligations as under the CFR but also has to procure marine insurance against the buyer's risk of loss or damage to the goods during the carriage. The seller contracts for insurance and pays the insurance premium. The CIF term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. CPT (Carriage Paid To) Seller pays the freight for the carriage of the goods to the named destination. The risk of loss of or damage to the goods, as well as any additional costs due to events occurring after the time the goods have been delivered to the carrier, is transferred from the seller to the buyer when the goods have been delivered into the custody of the carrier. If subsequent carriers are used for the carriage to the agreed upon destination, the risk passes when the goods have been delivered to the first carrier. The CPT term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. CIP (Carriage and Insurance Paid To) Seller has the same obligations as under CPT, but with the addition that the seller has to procure cargo insurance against the buyer's risk of loss of or damage to the goods during the carriage. The seller contracts for insurance and pays the insurance premium. The buyer should note that under the CIP term the seller is required to obtain insurance only on minimum coverage. The CIP term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. Sourcce: www. Exporters.com.sg

16 Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning Delivery terms DAF (Delivered At Frontier) Seller fulfill their obligation to deliver when the goods have been made available, cleared for export, at the named point and placed at the frontier, but before the customs Terms of Sale border of the adjoining country. DES (Delivered Ex Ship) Seller fulfills his/her obligation to deliver when the goods have been made available to the buyer on board the ship, uncleared for import at the named port of destination. The seller has to bear all the costs and risks involved in bringing the goods to the named port destination. DEQ (Delivered Ex Quay, [Duty Paid]) When the goods have been available to the buyer on the quay (wharf) at the named port of destination, cleared for importation. The seller has to bear all risks and costs including duties, taxes and other charges of delivering the goods thereto. DDU (Delivered Duty Unpaid) Seller fulfills his obligation to deliver when the goods have been made available at the named place in the country of importation. The seller has to bear the costs and risks involved in bringing the goods thereto (excluding duties, taxes and other official charges payable upon importation) as well as the costs and risks of carrying out customs formalities. The buyer has to pay any additional costs and to bear any risks caused by failure to clear the goods for in time. DDP (Delivered Duty paid) Seller fulfills his obligation to deliver when the goods have been made available at the named place in the country of importation. The seller has to bear the risks and costs, including duties, taxes and other charges of delivering the goods thereto, clear for importation. While the EXW term represents the minimum obligation for the seller, DDP represents the maximum. Sourcce: www. Exporters.com.sg

17 Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning Payment terms Cash cash in advance (CIA) Cash with order (CWO) Letter of credit (L/C) Documents against acceptance (D/A) Documents against payment (D/P) Open account (for example, 30 days net)

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21 Export Planning Cultural model by Hofstede Source: Hofstede Cultural Dimensions of the Hofstede - model Power Distance Index (PDI) Individualism (IDV) Masculinity (MAS) Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI) Long-Term Orientation (LTO)

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23 Export Planning Chapter review questions(10 min.) 1.What are the three steps of the export planning process? Motivate your answer. 2.Which elements are part of the logistics and organisation – step? Explain your answer. 3.Explain the purpose and use of the SCOR – model. 4.Create a SCOR overview for Danone entering the Russian market. Use the overview as presented in Figure 75 of the text. Base your logistics infrastructure on a factory in France (make to inventory), planning based on forecasting for finished goods on stock, distribution into Russia based upon one distributor (Danone itself) and several retail chains (supermarket chains). Returns will be handled in Russia and will not be shipped back to France. 5.What does the term INCOTERMS mean? How can you apply them?

24 Export Planning Institute _II_BPM Joris Leeman©, 2010 Export Planning Chapter review questions(10 min.) 6.Name three examples of Delivery terms and three examples of Payment terms. Explain for each example its content and use. 7.What export documents do you need when exporting from Netherlands to Namibia? And from China to Netherlands? Motivate your answer. 8.What four types of organisation structures do you know to manage an international business? Make a drawing of each organisation structure – type. 9. If Danone would enter the Russian market with the own subsidiary, what functions and activities would you coordinate centralized or decentralized? Make an overview. 10.What are the 5 dimensions of the culture model developed by G.Hofstede? What are the differences based on these 5 dimensions for a managers from China, S.America, Netherlands and U.S.A.? What would you do different if you have to travel and set up a meeting in one of these countries?


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