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Hazardous Substances. Purpose of Presentation This is a guide to the management of hazardous substances in DECS worksites. It includes advice about: responsibilities.

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Presentation on theme: "Hazardous Substances. Purpose of Presentation This is a guide to the management of hazardous substances in DECS worksites. It includes advice about: responsibilities."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hazardous Substances

2 Purpose of Presentation This is a guide to the management of hazardous substances in DECS worksites. It includes advice about: responsibilities of managers and employees purchasing safety information (ChemWatch and MSDSs) risk assessment and control options labelling storage (classes of substances) disposal where to get further advice

3 Definition: Hazardous Substance A substance that has the potential to cause illness or injury as identified by the manufacturer or importer and is included on the The Australian Safety and Compensation Council (formally NOHSC) list of designated hazardous substances.

4 DECS Hazardous Substances Procedure provides direction to managers and employees for the development and implementation of safe systems of work in relation to the purchase, assessment, use, storage and disposal of designated hazardous substances Download Here

5 Duties of Managers Worksite managers must develop and implement appropriate systems of work for the: –purchase –use –storage –disposal ………. of all substances

6 Duties of Employees Use non hazardous substances where possible Only use those hazardous substances on the approved substances list approved substances list Refer to Guidelines for Ordering and Preparing to use SubstancesGuidelines for Ordering and Preparing to use Substances Use the substance in accordance with the risk assessment and appropriate control optionsrisk assessment

7 Information about substances The ChemWatch database contains information about a vast number of substances ChemWatch is available on CD-ROM from Health and Safety Services and OnlineOnline ChemWatch can assist in: –Identifying hazardous substances –Printing MSDS –Printing Labels –Maintaining registers and manifests –Conducting risk assessments

8 ChemWatch ChemWatch front screen

9 Hazardous/Non Hazardous ChemWatch identifies the hazardous status of substances

10 Hazardous Substances Register Sites must maintain a register of all Hazardous Substances according to the OHS&W Regulations Regulations An example of a Hazardous Substances register template can be found on the OHS WebsiteOHS Website Hazardous Substances register must be readily accessible Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) must be included in the register

11 Hazardous Substances Register Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations Hazardous substances registers (1) An employer must ensure that a register is kept and maintained for all hazardous substances used at the workplace. (2) The employer must ensure that the register includes (a) a list of all hazardous substances used at the workplace; and (b) an MSDS for each hazardous substance (if an MSDS is required under these regulations). (3) The employer must ensure that the register is readily accessible to all employees who could be exposed to a hazardous substance. (4) Subregulations (1), (2) and (3) do not apply to a retailer or retail warehouse operator in relation to any hazardous substance which is intended for retail sale, which is supplied in a consumer package holding less than 30 kilograms or 30 litres of the substance and which is not intended to be opened on the premises of the retailer or operator. Click Here to Return

12 Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) MSDSs, available from supplier or ChemWatch, provide essential information describing: Properties Safe storage Uses Health Hazard information Precautions for use Safe Handling information Procedures for emergencies Disposal

13 Example Mini MSDS from ChemWatch

14 Risk Assessment risk assessments must be completed and control options implemented for all designated hazardous substances risk assessments for approved substances have been completed using ChemWatch and are available; see approved substances listapproved substances list risk assessments must consider how the substance will be used, and by whom

15 Control Options Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is the last option in the Hierarchy of ControlsHierarchy of Controls Ensure appropriate control measures are in place when handling hazardous substances PPE should be provided by Site Managers and worn by employees when required In special circumstances, information, instruction and training must be provided on the use and maintenance of PPE

16 Hierarchy of Controls Elimination (dispose of or do not purchase hazardous substances) Substitution (use a less hazardous substance) Engineering (eg: use substances in a fume cabinet/ open windows) Administration (maintain registers, training, labels, storage, disposal information) Personal Protective Equipment (safety glasses, aprons, gloves etc) Click Here to Return

17 Guidelines for Ordering and Preparing to use Substances from Hazardous Substances Procedure Hazardous Substances Procedure Download this document

18 Labelling All containers holding substances must be correctly labelled according to the OHS&W Regulations Regulations ChemWatch can generate labels for all substances Label generated in ChemWatch

19 Labelling Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations Labels (1) An employer must ensure (a) that any container which holds a hazardous substance used at work, including a container supplied to or produced within the workplace, is appropriately labelled; and (b) that a person does not remove, deface, modify or alter any such label. (2) Without limiting the operation of subregulation (1), an employer must ensure that a label (a) clearly identifies the hazardous substance; and (b) provides basic health and safety information about the substance. Click Here to Return

20 Chemical Storage Hazardous Substances must be kept in locked storage, with no unsupervised student access Storage Areas to be clearly signed Storage of substances is based on the Dangerous Goods classification Click here for detailed information on chemical storage Click here to continueClick here

21 Storage and Dangerous Goods Substances are stored in accordance with the magnitude of the dangerous nature of the substance Dangerous goods classification is different from hazardous substance classification as it does not consider adverse effects from long term exposure Substances may be both a hazardous substance and a dangerous good, although this can be for differing properties of the substance

22 Dangerous Goods Special segregated storage is required for the following Dangerous Goods Classes: Prescribed substances' under the Dangerous Goods Code are assigned a specific United Nations "UN" number and are divided into the following nine classes according to their predominant hazard: Class 1 Class 1 - Explosives Class 2 - Gases (flammable, non-flammable, toxic) Class 3 - Flammable liquids Class 4 - Flammable solids, solids liable to spontaneous combustion, and substances that emit flammable gases when wet Class 5 - Oxidising substances (oxidising agents and organic peroxides) Class 6 - Toxic and infectious substances Class 7 - Radioactive material Class 8 - Corrosive substances Class 9 - Miscellaneous dangerous substances Subsidiary Risk - dangerous goods that pose more than the risk that is denoted by their class. Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5 Class 6 Class 7 Class 8 Class 9 Subsidiary Risk Storage Considerations Storage Considerations – what goes with what? Each class is identified by a distinctive coloured, diamond shaped label Exit classes

23 Class 1 - Explosives Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Class 1.1 – Explosives with a mass explosion hazard such as TNT, Gunpowder, Gelignite, etc. Class 1.2 – Explosives which are a projectile or fragmentation hazard, but not a significant mass explosion hazard eg. grenades, ammunition, etc. Class 1.3 – Explosives which are a fire and minor blast hazard, with minor projectile or minor fragmentation hazards. Class 1.4 – Explosives which are not a significant mass explosion hazard eg. flares, fireworks, safety cartridges, etc. Class 1.5 – Explosives with a mass explosion hazard, but are insensitive substances. Class 1.6 – Substances which are a minor explosion hazard, very insensitive substances. Should not be used or stored in schools.

24 Class 2 - Gases (flammable, non-flammable, toxic) Completely gaseous at 20 degrees at Standard Temperature and Pressure Class 2.1 – Gases that can ignite in air on contact with a source of ignition. The vapour/air density is usually greater than one, therefore many flammable gases will settle in low areas. Example: propane, butane, ethylene, acetylene and Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) Class 2.2 – Gases that are non flammable but may cause asphyxiation and/or represent stored energy hazard. Non flammable and non toxic gases are asphyxiants, diluting or replacing the oxygen content in the atmosphere. Example: compressed air, nitrogen, argon and carbon dioxide

25 Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Storage Storage requirements for LPG is explained in Hazard Alert #7, L P Gas Tank and Cylinder Safety. More information on cylinder safety at Alert #7 Class 2.3 – Gases likely to cause death or serious injury to human health if exposed or by skin contact. These gases are toxic or corrosive. Lingering and irritating odours often identify some but not all toxic gases. Example: ammonia and sulphur dioxide. See also Subsidiary Risk for special casesSubsidiary Risk Class 2 - Gases (flammable, non-flammable, toxic) Completely gaseous at 20 degrees at Standard Temperature and Pressure

26 Liquids, the vapours of which can ignite in air on contact with a source of ignition. Liquids that can generate a vapour, forming a flammable mixture with air. The vapour can flash momentarily when an ignition source is present. This property of a flammable liquid is regarded as the flash point. Therefore this is the lowest temperature of a liquid which generates vapours to form a flammable mixture with air and can catch fire when a flame is applied. Examples of Class 3 substances: petrol, alcohols, thinners, solvents, lacquers and varnishes Class 3 - Flammable liquids

27 Store in an approved flammables cabinet (AS : The storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids) Vent cabinet to the outside with forced extraction Max. storage 250 Litres Cabinet to be placarded as flammable Pratt Safety Flammables Cabinet model 5560 AS Class 3 - Flammable liquids Class 3 is divided in the following way for packing/transport: Class 3 Packing Group I is Boiling Point <=35°C. Class 3 Packing Group II is Flash Point 35°C. Class 3 Packing Group III is Flash Point > 23°C to 35°C.

28 Fire Protection Requirements: At least one dry powder type fire extinguisher to be provided for each Flammables storage unit Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Class 3 - Flammable liquids

29 Class 4 - Flammable Solids Solid substances which are flammable in air and can sustain spontaneous combustion and emit flammable gases upon contact with water. Class 4.1 – Solids easily ignited eg. by sparks or flames, or liable to cause fire through friction. Class 4.2 – Substances liable to spontaneously heat up and ignite. Class 4.3 – Substance which emits flammable or toxic gases when wet. Class 4.1 – Solids easily ignited eg. by sparks or flames, or liable to cause fire through friction. Example: red phosphorus, picric acid, hexamine, sulphur and naphthalene. Class 4.2 – Substances liable to spontaneously heat up and ignite Examples: activated carbon and white phosphorus. Class 4.3 – Substance which emits flammable or toxic gases when wet Examples: sodium and calcium carbide.

30 Class 4.1 – Solids easily ignited eg. by sparks or flames, or liable to cause fire through friction. Class 4.2 – Substances liable to spontaneously heat up and ignite. Class 4.3 – Substance which emits flammable or toxic gases when wet. Class 4.1 – Solids easily ignited eg. by sparks or flames, or liable to cause fire through friction. Storage: All Class 4 substances must be segregated from Classes 5.1 and 5.2 Class 4.1 and 4.3: Store in segregated storage area, or with Class 3 substances (eg in Flammables storage unit). Signed Class 4.1, 4.3: Flammable Solids Class 4.2: Separate from all other classes in a designated cupboard lined with cement sheeting or similar flame proof material. Must be segregated from Classes 3, 4.1, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2. Signed Class 4.2: Spontaneously Combustible Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Class 4 - Flammable Solids Solid substances which are flammable in air and can sustain spontaneous combustion and emit flammable gases upon contact with water.

31 Class 5.1 – Substances likely to increase the risk and intensity of fire in other materials (ie Contribute to the combustion of other materials). Examples: Hydrogen peroxide and ammonium nitrate, chlorates. Class 5 – Oxidising substances (oxidising agents and organic peroxides) Oxygen is generally provided in a reactive form or is liberated to cause an oxidation process.

32 Class Substances that are thermally unstable and likely to react dangerously with other substances. Substances with the ability to undergo exothermic self accelerating decomposition as the substance contains its own oxygen in the chemical structure. Decomposition of organic peroxides can lead to flammable and toxic gases being generated. Many organic peroxides also burn rapidly and are very sensitive to impact or friction. Examples: dibenzoyl peroxide and methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) Class 5 – Oxidising substances (oxidising agents and organic peroxides) continued Oxygen is generally provided in a reactive form or is liberated to cause an oxidation process.

33 CLASS 5 STORAGE : Separate from all other classes in a designated cupboard, particularly from Classes 3, 4, and 8 Lockable Cement sheet lined (eg Hardiflex) Signed (Class 5: Oxidising Agents) These substances are incompatible with other substances, particularly Flammables (solids and liquids), Corrosives. Flammable matter such as sawdust require segregated storage away from other materials Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Class 5 – Oxidising substances (oxidising agents and organic peroxides) continued Oxygen is generally provided in a reactive form or is liberated to cause an oxidation process.

34 Class 6 Toxic and infectious substances Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Class 6.1 – Toxic substances likely to cause death or severe injury to human or animal health if swallowed, inhaled or by skin contact. Examples: Calcium cyanide and lead arsenate. Class Infectious substances liable to cause death or severe injury to human or animal health if swallowed, inhaled or by skin contact. Substances containing disease yielding organisms and are not subject to the regulations of the Australian Dangerous Goods Code. However, they are incorporated in the Code if they are capable of spreading disease upon exposure. Stringent clothing and personal protective equipment controls are required when handling or in contact with these substances.

35 Class 7 - Radioactive material Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Class 7 – Substances (solid or liquid) which spontaneously emit ionising radiation. Category I, determined by radiation level of transport package. (Lowest level) Class 7 - Substances (solid or liquid) which spontaneously emit ionising radiation. Category II determined by radiation level of transport package. Class 7 – Substances (solid or liquid) which spontaneously emit ionising radiation. Category III determined by radiation level of transport package Note: the approved radioactive sources in SA schools pose negligible risk. See OHS&W Science Manual for further advice on radioactive sources.OHS&W Science Manual

36 Class 8 - Corrosive substances Solids or liquids able to cause, to varying severity, damage to living tissue. Maybe either acidic or caustic in nature. Cause burns in contact with skin and eyes. Many form vapours that are harmful to respiratory system. Exposure can occur through breathing vapours. In the event of a leak, these substances also have the ability to damage or destroy goods and materials or cause other hazards.

37 Examples: Zinc Chloride and soldering fluxes with Zinc Chloride Hydrochloric Acid (Spirits of Salts) Nitric Acid Sulfuric Acid (battery acid) Sodium Hydroxide (caustic soda) Ammonia solution Class 8 - Corrosive substances

38 CLASS 8 STORAGE: Lockable Signed (Class 8: CORROSIVES) Plastic laminate lined, stainless steel hinges and fittings Vented to the outside (ideally forced) Spillage tray in the bottom Class 8 - Corrosive substances Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes

39 Class 9 Miscellaneous dangerous substances Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Substances and articles that present a danger especially during transport, not covered by other dangerous goods classes. Class 9 substances have separate storage and transport requirements. Examples: dry ice and asbestos. NB - Aerosols are no longer Class 9 dangerous goods. They are Class 2.1 or 2.2 (gases) depending on flammability.

40 Subsidiary Risk dangerous goods that pose more than the risk that is denoted by their class Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes Subsidiary risk categories are assigned to dangerous goods that pose more than the risk that is denoted by their class. The may also be referred to as the secondary risk or subrisk. The subsidiary risk label is represented as the normal label with the number deleted. Example: Special Case Oxygen, nitrous oxide Class 2.2 Subsidiary Risk Class 5.1

41 Storage Considerations Some classes of chemicals must be segregated from other classes because of their reaction potential with other chemical classes. Flammable substances must be segregated (Classes 3, 4.1 and 4.3) Spontaneous Combustibles must be segregated (Class 4.2)Class 4.2 Oxidisers must be segregated (Class 5)Class 5 Corrosives must be segregated (Class 8)Class 8 (see individual Class slides for more details on storage)Class slides Index (back)Index (back), Exit classesExit classes

42 Subsidiary Risk Do not dispose of any hazardous substances in general rubbish bins Ensure compliance with requirements on MSDS and labels Use the DECS bulk hazardous substances pickup when programmed Contact your local council for information In an emergency spill situation, contact the MFS or CFS and inform Health & Safety Services

43 Training OHS&W Regulations (1995) require Site Managers to provide training for all staff using hazardous substancesRegulations

44 Training Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations Instruction and training (1) An employer must provide instruction and training in accordance with this regulation to any employee who could be exposed to hazardous substances in the workplace. (2) The instruction and training must be commensurate with any risk to health caused by a hazardous substance that has been identified by the assessment process referred to in regulation (3) The instruction and training must be provided in a manner that is appropriate to the employees in the workplace. (4) The employer must keep a record of any instruction and training provided under this regulation. Click Here to Return

45 Codes of Practice Approved codes of practice under the OHS&W Act relevant to the use of hazardous substances include: Code of Practice for the Control of Workplace Hazardous SubstancesCode of Practice for the Control of Workplace Hazardous Substances Code of Practice for the Preparation of Material Safety Data Sheets Code of Practice for the Labelling of Workplace Substances

46 See Also: Code of Practice for the Safe Use of Ionizing Radiation in Secondary SchoolsCode of Practice for the Safe Use of Ionizing Radiation in Secondary Schools Code of Practice for the Safe Removal of Asbestos Code of Practice for Asbestos Work Code of Practice for the Safe Use of Synthetic Mineral Fibres More are available from Codes of Practice cont

47 What do I need to do if I want to use a substance? 1.Check if the substance is hazardous or non-hazardous (use ChemWatch) 2.If non-hazardous, proceed with purchase and follow safety info on label 3.If hazardous, check Approved Substances List (or seek non-hazardous alternative) 4.If substance is not on list, do not proceed with purchase, seek non-hazardous alternative

48 Summary Hazardous substances must be identified Risk assessments must be completed Control options must be in place for all substances: –Training (including safe work practices) –Purchasing procedures –Disposal –Engineering and Substitution considered –Labelling –Registers & Storage –Personal protective equipment (PPE)

49 Need More information? Hazardous Substances section of the OHSW Website (this site includes information on using ChemWatch)OHSW Website Hazardous Substances Procedure SafeWork SA WorkCover Website Health & Safety Services –


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