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Day 10 Bell work: – How many States of Matter are there?

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1 Day 10 Bell work: – How many States of Matter are there?

2 How many States of Matter are there? We will focus on three States of Matter in this class: SOLID, LIQUID & GAS. Plasma is the 4 th State of Matter. A 5 th State of Matter, the Bose-Einstein condensate, is rare.

3 Q: What is the term when a liquid changes to a gas at room temperature? A. boiling B. sublimation C. evaporation D. deposition SC c DOK 1

4 A: What is the term when a liquid changes to a gas at room temperature? A.boiling - Incorrect. Occurs when a substance is heated. B.sublimation – Incorrect. Is when a solid changes directly to a gas. C.evaporation– Correct. Is the change from a liquid to a gas at room temperature. No heating is needed D.deposition– Incorrect. Is the change from a gas to a solid. SC c DOK 14

5 Mathematics Booster Write the following measurements in scientific notion. a.450,000,000 b

6 Mathematics Booster Write the following measurements in scientific notion. a.450,000,000 km 4.5 x 10 8 km b x g

7 Objectives I will know the three common states of matter. I will be able to describe how energy, particle arrangement, and particle motion vary among the different states of matter.

8 How can shape and volume be used to classify materials? Describing the States of Matter Materials can be classified as solids, liquids, or gases based on whether their shapes and volumes are definite or variable.

9 Solids What do these four objects have in common: a pencil, a quarter, a book, and a cafeteria tray? They all have a recognizable shape and they all take up a certain amount of space. The materials in these objects are all in the solid state. Solid is the state of matter in which materials have a definite shape and a definite volume. Describing the States of Matter

10 Solids Samples of solid copper have definite volume. Copper atoms are packed close together in an orderly arrangement. Almost all solids have some type of orderly arrangement of particles at the atomic level. Describing the States of Matter

11 Liquids How good are you at estimating whether the juice remaining in an almost-empty bottle will fit in a glass? The shape of the liquid changes as you move it from one container to the other. Describing the States of Matter

12 Liquids A liquid always has the same shape as its container and can be poured from one container to another. Liquid is the state of matter in which a material has a definite volume but not a definite shape. Describing the States of Matter

13 Liquids At room temperature, mercury is a liquid. Drops of mercury on a flat, clean surface have a round shape. Mercury in a container has the same shape as its container. The mercury atoms are close together, but their arrangement is more random than the arrangement of atoms in solid copper. Describing the States of Matter

14 Liquids At room temperature, mercury is a liquid. Drops of mercury on a flat, clean surface have a round shape. Mercury in a container has the same shape as its container. The mercury atoms are close together, but their arrangement is more random than the arrangement of atoms in solid copper. Describing the States of Matter

15 Day 11Bell Work Compare and Contrast solids and liquids How are they alike? Both have a definite volume How are they different? Solids have a definite shape the atoms are usually have an orderly arrangement. Liquids no definite shape atoms are able to move around one another.

16 Gases Think of a gas. Describing the States of Matter

17 Gases How many of you came up with Air? Air is a mixture of gases. What are some of the other examples? Describing the States of Matter

18 Gases Gas is the state of matter in which a material has neither a definite shape nor a definite volume. A gas takes the shape and volume of its container. Describing the States of Matter

19 Gases The shape of the helium in a balloon is the same as the shape of the balloon itself. The volume of the helium in a balloon is equal to the volume of the balloon. Describing the States of Matter

20 Gases The helium atoms in a balloon are not arranged in a regular pattern. They are at random locations throughout the balloon. Describing the States of Matter

21 Other States of Matter About ninety-nine percent of all the matter in the universe exists in a state that is not as common on Earth as solids, liquids, and gases. At extremely high temperatures, such as those found in stars, matter exists as PLASMA. Describing the States of Matter

22 Other States of Matter Plasma is an ionized gas, is a cloud of protons, neutrons and electrons where all the electrons have come loose from their respective molecules and atoms, giving the plasma the ability to act as a whole rather than as a bunch of atoms. cloud On earth, plasma is naturally occurring in flames, lightning and the auroras. Describing the States of Matter

23 Other States of Matter At temperatures near –273°C, groups of atoms behave as though they are a single particle. This fifth state of matter is called a Bose-Einstein condensate (or BEC). Describing the States of Matter

24 Kinetic Theory The kinetic theory of matter says that all particles of matter are in constant motion. Kinetic energy is the energy an object has due to its motion.


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