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Family Times Daily Questions Prior Knowledge Generalize Vocabulary Prefixes Predictions Guided Comprehension Graphic Sources Persuasive Devices Independent.

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Presentation on theme: "Family Times Daily Questions Prior Knowledge Generalize Vocabulary Prefixes Predictions Guided Comprehension Graphic Sources Persuasive Devices Independent."— Presentation transcript:

1 Family Times Daily Questions Prior Knowledge Generalize Vocabulary Prefixes Predictions Guided Comprehension Graphic Sources Persuasive Devices Independent Readers Dame Shirley Goes to the Gold Rush Additional Resources

2 Study Skills Genre: Expository Nonfiction Vocabulary Strategy: Word Structure Comprehension Skill: Generalize Comprehension Strategy: Graphic Organizers

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5 Question of the Week: What adventures helped drive westward expansion? Daily Questions How does the Gould Rush represent the American Dream? What can ghost towns teach us about the past? Explain. What challenges did Louise Clappe face in her journey?

6 Activate Prior Knowledge Ghost TownsModern-Day Towns Quiet Old Buildings Dusty Busy Newer Buildings Clean

7 Generalize To generalize means to make a broad statement or rule that applies to several examples. Sometimes authors make generalizations in their writing. Clue words such as all, many, and most can signal generalizations. Active readers pay close attention to these generalizations. If they are supported by the text or logic, they are valid generalizations. If they are not supported by the text or by logic, they are faulty generalizations. Generalization Support from article

8 Graphic Organizers Active readers often use graphic organizers to help them understand and remember what they read. Graphic organizers can be used before, during, or after reading a selection. You can create a graphic organizer like the one above to help you decide whether an authors generalizations are valid.

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10 Write 1.Read The Gold Rush. Make a graphic organizer like the one above for the final paragraph. 2.Is the generalization in the final paragraph valid or faulty? Explain your answer in a paragraph of your own.

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14 Vocabulary Word List Economic Independence Overrun Scrawled Vacant Introduce Vocabulary Predict a definition, and use the word in a sample sentences. Verify the definition. Revise sample sentence.

15 Economic Of or about the management of the income, supplies, and expenses of a household, government, etc.

16 Independence Freedom from the control, influence, support, or help of others

17 Overrun To spread over

18 Scrawled Written or drawn poorly or carelessly

19 Vacant Not Occupied

20 More Words to Know Mercantile: Of merchants or trade; commercial Prosperity: Prosperous condition; good fortune; success Tumbledown: Ready to fall down; not in good condition; dilapidated

21 Practice Lesson Vocabulary: Yes or No If a house is vacant, is someone living there? Is a student who scrawled a note on a classroom wall going to get in trouble? Did the American colonies gain independence from Britain? Fill in the Blank Too many people and not enough gold to mine led to _________ problems in western towns. Soon the small towns were ____________ by men who were hoping to strike it rich. The buildings in ghost towns are mostly _____________.

22 Vocabulary Strategy (p.606) Prefixes: over-, in-, re- A prefix is a word part added at the beginning of a base word. Each prefix has a meaning of its own. Recognizing a prefixs meaning can help you figure out the words meaning. For example, on of the meanings for the prefix over- is (too much.) A room thats overcrowded is to crowded. The prefix in- can mean not. People who are insensitive are not sensitive. 1.Look at an unfamiliar word to see if it has a base word you know. 2. Check to see if a prefix has been added to the base word. 3.Ask yourself how the prefix changes the meaning of the base word. 4.Try the meaning in the sentence. Does it make sense? As you read The Skys the Limit, find words with the prefixes re- and in-. Use the prefixes to help you figure out the meanings of the words.

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25 Genre: Expository Nonfiction Expository nonfiction explains a person, a thing, or an idea. Notice how the author tries to solve the mysteries surrounding ghost towns.

26 Why did Busy Towns Turn Into Ghost Towns?

27 Preview and Predict Preview the selection title, photographs, and captions. When you finish, identify the topics and ideas you think the selection will cover. Use lesson vocabulary in your discussion.

28 Guided Comprehension Which details help you visualize a ghost town? What generalization can you make about ghost towns? Why do you think cowboys, farmers, merchants, bankers, doctors, and teachers followed the miners? The settlers in this selection lift their homes and headed west in hopes of becoming rich. Can you think of another group who did something similar? What conclusions can you draw from the photograph on p. 613? What base word do you see in Independence? What prefix has been added to the base word? What does independence mean? Why do you think the author included the quotation from Mark Twain?

29 Guided Comprehension Continued What happened if the railroad bypassed a village? Why? What generalizations does the selection make about women? Why did many western towns become ghost towns? To what does the selection compare the memories, hopes, and dreams of the people who once lived in these ghost towns? Why do you think this comparison is made? Does this remind you of any other book you might have read?

30 Graphic Sources (TM613) Graphic sources can be used to draw conclusions as you read. Examine the photograph on p.613 and read the caption. I can see by looking at this picture and by reading the caption that these travelers arent exactly happy. From this picture and from what the text says, I can conclude that the journey to California must have been pretty tough. Examine the photograph on p What conclusions can you draw about mining for gold?

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32 Persuasive Devices Sometimes a wrier will use persuasive devices, or propaganda techniques, to make an argument more convincing. These include: Loaded Words which create certain emotions or make value judgments. Slogans which appeal to peoples emotions rather than logic. Generalities, or vague statements, rather than specific facts and details. Bandwagon, meaning everyone else is doing it. Testimonials, or endorsements, by celebrities or other will-known people.

33 Look at the quote on p. 615 by Mark Twain. Notice these loaded words: driving vigorous, simpering, dainty, kid-gloved weaklings, stalwart, dauntless, young braves. Imagine you own a hotel in a gold rush town. Write an advertisement persuading people to visit the town and stay at their hotel using at least two persuasive devices.

34 SUMMARY This reader outlines the westward expansion of the United States in the 1800s. It describes the search for resources that led to the Louisiana Purchase and Lewis and Clarks journey. It also describes the impact that this expansion had on the Native American peoples already living there. COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS PAGE 6 Whom did Jefferson send to Paris to try to buy New Orleans? PAGE 7 Which country owned Louisiana at the time just before the Purchase? PAGE 12 Which river did Lewis and Clark start out on? PAGE 16 What mountain range did Lewis and Clark run into? PAGE 22 As a result of the United States western expansion, where did Native American groups end up living?

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37 SUMMARY This reader outlines the westward expansion of the United States in the 1800s. It describes the search for resources that led to the Louisiana Purchase and Lewis and Clarks journey. It also describes the impact that this expansion had on the Native American peoples already living there. COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS PAGE 6 Whom did Jefferson send to Paris to try to buy New Orleans? PAGE 7 Which country owned Louisiana at the time just before the Purchase? PAGE 12 Which river did Lewis and Clark start out on? PAGE 16 What mountain range did Lewis and Clark run into? PAGE 22 As a result of the United States western expansion, where did Native American groups end up living?

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40 SUMMARY This work presents a collection of stories of western territories and the process by which they became states. It begins with a discussion of The Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clarks expedition, and The Missouri Compromise. The work covers the historical context of the period and touches on important social issues affecting the statehood process, such as the practice of slavery. It contains a chronological chart of all the states admitted to the United States in the 1800s. COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS PAGE 3 How many states did the United States have originally? PAGE 4 What country did President Jefferson make a deal with in The Louisiana Purchase? PAGE 6 What group of people did Lewis and Clark set out to learn more about? PAGE 8 Which national body has to approve admission of a new state? PAGE 11 When the Missouri Compromise was reached, how many slave states and how many free states were there?

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43 Genre: Narrative Nonfiction Narrative nonfiction tells the story of an event or series of events. Some narrative nonfiction describes events from peoples lives. Text Features Sometimes maps are used to make the events easier to follow. Interactive maps use numbers to link the events described to geographic places.

44 What do you think this selection is about? What does the map on p. 622 tell you about Dame Shirleys trip? What makes this look like a difficult journey? What main idea would summarize this article?

45 Additional Resources


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