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Big Question: How do we decide the value of different resources? Author: Sarah Angliss Genre: Expository Nonfiction.

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Presentation on theme: "Big Question: How do we decide the value of different resources? Author: Sarah Angliss Genre: Expository Nonfiction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Big Question: How do we decide the value of different resources? Author: Sarah Angliss Genre: Expository Nonfiction

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3 Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

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5 mileage moisture heroism storage passage organism journalism failure mixture postage luggage departure patriotism optimism acreage percentage enclosure voltage temperature mannerism metabolism impressionism patronage brokerage architecture

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7 characteristic corrode engulfed exploit extract hoard rivet solvents log cabin lumber miners prospect Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Question of the Day How do we decide the value of different resources?

9 Build Concepts Main Idea Text Structure Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Phrasing Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Spelling: Suffixes –ism, -age, -ure Resources

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11 Listen as I read Children of the Gold Rush. As I read, notice how I emphasize the chunking of groups of words together into meaningful units. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 Why do the Andersons move to the Klondike? How did the narrators experiences during the gold rush affect the rest of her life?

13 log cabin – a small roughly-built house made of logslog cabin lumber – timber that has been roughly cut into boards and prepared for uselumber miners – people who work in a mineminers prospect – to explore a region for oil, gold, or other mineralsprospect (Next Slide)

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18 Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new informion, and save your changes.)

19 MineralsForestsWater Resources

20 Main Idea and Details, Text Structure Turn to Page Text Structure Turn to Page

21 PropertiesUses Where its found Gold

22 This weeks audio explores gold prospecting. After you listen, we will discuss what surprised you the most about people who still prospect for gold today.

23 Vocabulary Words

24 characteristic – distinguishing one person or thing from others; special corrode – to wear or eat away graduallycorrode engulfed – swallowed up; overwhelmedengulfed

25 exploit – to make use of extract – to pull or draw out hoard – what is saved and stored awayhoard

26 rivet – a metal bolt with a head at one end, the other end being hammered into another head after insertion rivet solvents – substances, usually liquids, that can dissolve other substancessolvents (Next slide) (Next slide)

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32 Grammar Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

33 at increased tempuratures, gold can be stretched in to fine wire At increased temperatures, gold can be stretched into fine wire. golds atoms bond together loose Golds atoms bond together loosely.

34 Gold is 19.3 times denser than water. Denser is a comparative adjective. It is used to compare two things, gold and water.

35 Comparative adjectives are used to compare two people, places, things, or groups. Add –er to most short adjectives to make their comparative forms. Use more with longer adjectives.

36 Superlative adjectives are used to compare three or more people, places, things, or groups. Add –est to most short adjectives to make their superlative forms. Use most with longer adjectives.

37 AdjectiveComparativeSuperlative small smaller smallest precious more preciousmost precious

38 Never use more or most with –er or –est. No: most longer, most amazingest Yes: longer, most amazing

39 When adding –er or –est to an adjective that ends in e, drop the e: large, larger, largest. If the adjective ends in y, change the y to i: merry, merrier, merriest.

40 If the adjective ends in a single consonant, double the consonant: hot, hotter, hottest

41 Some adjectives have irregular comparative and superlative forms: good, better, best; bad, worse, worst; much, more, most; little, less, least

42 AdjectiveComparativeSuperlative fancy rare delicate thin rugged lovely good

43 My ring is (more beautiful, beautifuller) than my sisters ring. more beautiful There is (more, most) brass than gold in this goblet. more

44 Terri put her charm bracelet in the (most safe, safest) place she could find. safest

45 I tightened the clasp to make the necklace (securer, more secure) than before. more secure

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47 mileage moisture heroism storage passage organism journalism failure mixture postage luggage departure patriotism optimism acreage percentage enclosure voltage temperature mannerism metabolism impressionism patronage brokerage architecture

48 Question of the Day Why do you think gold is no longer used to make coins for everyday use?

49 Context Clues Main Idea Cause and Effect Vocabulary Fluency: Echo Reading Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Spelling: Suffixes –ism, -age, -ure Social Studies: Gold as World Currency Resources

50 Vocabulary Strategy: Context Clues Turn to Page

51 Gold Turn to Page

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53 Turn to page 613. As I read, notice how I group together the words that form independent clauses and prepositional phrases. We will practice as a class doing three echo readings.

54 Grammar Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

55 pure gold are one of us most precious metals Pure gold is one of our most precious metals. can gold be shaped in their pure form Can gold be shaped in its pure form?

56 A comparative adjective is used to compare two persons, places, things, or groups. Add –er to a short adjective. Use the word more with a longer adjective.

57 A superlative is used to compare three or more persons, places, things, or groups. Add –est to a short adjective. Use the word most with a longer adjective.

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59 mileage moisture heroism storage passage organism journalism failure mixture postage luggage departure patriotism optimism acreage percentage enclosure voltage temperature mannerism metabolism impressionism patronage brokerage architecture

60 Question of the Day Why is it unlikely that a gold rush would occur today?

61 Text Structure Context Clues Vocabulary Fluency: Phrasing Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Spelling: Suffixes –ism, -age, -ure Science: Gold Leaf Resources

62 Gold Turn to Page

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64 Turn to page 606, paragraphs 1-2. As I read, notice how I use punctuation as a guide to chunking words into meaningful groups. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings.

65 Grammar Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

66 most metal ores they have a high percentege of impurities Most metal ores have a high percentage of impurities. bank vaults is safest than other places to store gold bullion Bank vaults are safer than other places to store gold bullion.

67 A comparative adjective is used to compare two persons, places, things, or groups. Add –er to a short adjective. Use the word more with a longer adjective.

68 A superlative is used to compare three or more persons, places, things, or groups. Add –est to a short adjective. Use the word most with a longer adjective.

69 You can add variety and color to your writing by using comparative and superlative adjectives, in addition to positive adjectives, in your descriptive writing.

70 Positive: The movie was interesting. Comparative: The movie was more interesting than my brothers one-of-a-kind reptile collection.

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72 mileage moisture heroism storage passage organism journalism failure mixture postage luggage departure patriotism optimism acreage percentage enclosure voltage temperature mannerism metabolism impressionism patronage brokerage architecture

73 Question of the Day What other valuable nuggets might someone find from prospecting for gold or by pursuing other manmade resources, such as money?

74 Online Reference Sources Reading Across Texts Fluency: Partner Reading Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Spelling: Suffixes –ism, -age, -ure Social Studies: Make a Collage

75 The California Gold Rush Turn to Page

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77 Turn to page 606, paragraphs 1-2. Read this three times with a partner. Be sure to group words into meaningful units and offer each other feedback.

78 Grammar Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

79 gold never loses its lusster Gold never loses its luster. gold is an heavy metal than others Gold is a heavier metal than others.

80 A comparative adjective is used to compare two persons, places, things, or groups. Add –er to a short adjective. Use the word more with a longer adjective.

81 A superlative is used to compare three or more persons, places, things, or groups. Add –est to a short adjective. Use the word most with a longer adjective.

82 Test Tip: When taking a test, never use more and –er or most and –est together. Incorrect: Gold is one of the most valuablest metals. Correct: Gold is one of the most valuable metals.

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84 mileage moisture heroism storage passage organism journalism failure mixture postage luggage departure patriotism optimism acreage percentage enclosure voltage temperature mannerism metabolism impressionism patronage brokerage architecture

85 Question of the Day How do we decide the value of different resources?

86 Build Concept Vocabulary Main Idea and Details Paraphrase Context Clues Grammar: Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Spelling: Suffixes –ism, -age, -ure Type Formats Resources

87 The supporting details in a paragraph all contribute to the main idea. The main idea is always a complete sentence, which may or may not be directly stated.

88 When you paraphrase a passage of writing, you put it in your own words. A paraphrase should reflect the authors ideas and opinions but be easier to read than the original. Paraphrasing is an important skill that students use to study for tests, to gather research for reports, and to retell stories.

89 You can use the context, or words and phrases around an unfamiliar word, to help determine meaning. List any unknown words you find as you read Gold. Create a chart showing the unfamiliar word, helpful context clues, and a definition based on these clues. You can use a dictionary or glossary.

90 WordContext CluesMeaning

91 Different type formats are used to make printed information more clear and easier to read. Boldface is used to draw attention to words and phrases. Titles of selections, headings, and vocabulary words often appear in boldface.

92 Italics are used for titles. Underline is sometimes used to draw attention to words. Type size can be varied to make titles and headings stand out. Bullets are often used to set off a series of steps or main points.

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94 Grammar Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

95 over 100,000 fourty-niners went to california hoping to find there fortunes Over 100,000 forty-niners went to California hoping to find their fortunes. most prospectors in the california gold rush was failers Most prospectors in the California Gold Rush were failures.

96 A comparative adjective is used to compare two persons, places, things, or groups. Add –er to a short adjective. Use the word more with a longer adjective.

97 A superlative is used to compare three or more persons, places, things, or groups. Add –est to a short adjective. Use the word most with a longer adjective.

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99 mileage moisture heroism storage passage organism journalism failure mixture postage luggage departure patriotism optimism acreage percentage enclosure voltage temperature mannerism metabolism impressionism patronage brokerage architecture

100 Story test Story test Classroom webpage, Classroom webpage, Reading Test Reading Test AR AR Other Reading Quizzes Other Reading Quizzes Quiz # Quiz #


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