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2014 OFC Significant Changes and New Amendments

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1 2014 OFC Significant Changes and New Amendments
Presenter Retired DSFM John Caul 1

2 2014 OFC Significant Changes and New Amendments
The purpose of this training is to give Oregon Fire Code users an update on the significant changes between the 2009 International Fire Code (IFC) and the 2012 IFC and an update on any new Oregon amendments added to the 2014 Oregon Fire Code (2014 OFC) that were not in the 2010 OFC.

3 Chapter Reorganization
The 2012 IFC has been completely reorganized into parts to make it easier for its users. Part I – Administrative Chapter 1 Scope and Administration Chapter 2 Definitions Part II – General Safety Provisions Chapter 3 General Requirements Chapter 4 Emergency Planning and Preparedness The reorganization combined respective chapters into key sections. This organization establishes certain placeholders in the event future chapters are developed and approved. The 2012 IFC is divided into seven parts. Each part is assigned to a particular subject matter. The chapters with requirements applicable to a particular part are located within each respective part. Several chapters were relocated as a result of this format revision.

4 Chapter Reorganization
Part III – Building and Equipment Design Features Chapter 5 Fire Service Features Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems Chapter 7 Fire-Resistance-Rated Construction Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems Chapter 10 Means of Egress

5 Chapter Reorganization
Chapter Aviation Facilities Chapter Dry Cleaning Chapter Combustible Dust-Producing Operations Chapter Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages Chapter Flammable Finishes Chapter Fruit and Crop Ripening

6 Chapter Reorganization
Chapter Fumigation and Insecticidal Fogging Chapter Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities Chapter Lumber Yards and Woodworking Facilities Chapter Manufacture of Organic Coatings Chapter Industrial Ovens Chapter Tents and Other Membrane Structures Chapter High-Piled Combustible Storage

7 Chapter Reorganization
Chapter Fire Safety during Construction and Demolition Chapter Tire Rebuilding and Tire Storage Chapter Welding and Other Hot Work Chapter Marinas Chapter 37 through 49 (reserved)

8 Chapter Reorganization
Part V – Hazardous Materials Chapter Hazardous Materials–General Provisions Chapter Aerosols Chapter Combustible Fibers Chapter Compressed Gases Chapter Corrosive Materials Chapter Cryogenic Fluids

9 Chapter Reorganization
Chapter Explosives and Fireworks Chapter Flammable and Combustible Liquids Chapter Flammable Gases and Flammable Cryogenic Fluids Chapter Flammable Solids Chapter Highly Toxic and Toxic Materials Chapter Liquefied Petroleum Gases Chapter Organic Peroxides

10 Chapter Reorganization
Chapter Oxidizers, Oxidizing Gases and Oxidizing Cryogenic Fluids Chapter Pyrophoric Materials Chapter Pyroxylin (Cellulose Nitrate) Plastics Chapter Unstable (Reactive) Materials Chapter Water-Reactive Solids and Liquids Chapter 68 through 79 (reserved)

11 Chapter Reorganization
Part VI – Referenced Standards Chapter Referenced Standards Part VII – Appendices There were no changes to Appendices A through I. Appendix J is now Building Information Signs. It used to be Emergency Responder Radio Coverage which was folded into the body of the code in Chapter 5, Section 510. No changes to Appendix A through I. Appendix J which was Emergency Responder Radio Coverage that was folded into Section 510 and Appendix J is now Building information signs.

12 Chapter 2 Definitions Section 202 General Definitions 24 Hour Care Basis. The actual time that a person is an occupant within a facility for the purpose of receiving care. It shall not include a facility that is open for 24 hours and is capable of providing care to someone visiting the facility during any segment of the 24 hours. This change is a new Oregon amendment that brings in a change that will occur in the 2015 IBC and IFC. This change was adopted early by Oregon so the existing Appendix SR could go away.

13 Chapter 2 Definitions Ambulatory Health Care Facility. Buildings or portions thereof used to provide medical, surgical, psychiatric, nursing or similar care on a less than 24-hour basis to persons individuals who are rendered incapable of self-preservation by the services provided. Custodial Care. Assistance with day-to-day living tasks, such as assistance with cooking, taking medication, bathing, using toilet facilities and other Ambulatory Care Facility. References occupancies where persons cannot respond as an individual to an emergency not just health care occupancies. Custodial Care is a new definition in the 2012 IFC and IBC. In custodial care, the occupants are provided a level of assistance in performing daily tasks but egress at a slower rate and may have mental illness issues. Recipients of custodial care may be capable of self preservation or need limited assistance with evacuation based on the occupancy “condition.”

14 Chapter 2 Definitions Custodial Care, con’t tasks of daily living. Custodial care includes persons receiving care who occupants that have the ability to respond to emergency situations and evacuate at a slower rate and/or who have mental and psychiatric complications. Detoxification Facilities. Facilities that serve patients who are provide treatment for substance abuse on a 24-hour basis and serving care recipients Detoxification Facilities has been reworded and these persons are incapable of self-preservation. Individuals may cause injury to themselves or others and may be either medicated or secured with no ability to egress.

15 Chapter 2 Definitions Detoxification Facilities, con’t who are incapable of self-preservation or who are harmful to themselves or others. Discharge Site. The immediate area surrounding the fireworks mortars used for an outdoor fireworks display. See OAR (16). Display Site. The immediate area where a fireworks display is conducted. The display area includes the discharge site, the fallout area and the required These next few definitions for fireworks are deleted by Oregon as they are defined in the administrative rules for fireworks. They were deleted as to not create a conflict.

16 Chapter 2 Definitions Display Site, con’t separation distance from the mortars to spectator viewing areas. The display area does not include spectator viewing areas or vehicle parking areas. See OAR (20). Fireworks Display. A presentation of fireworks for a public or private gathering. See OAR (17). General Display Fireworks, 1.3G. Large fireworks

17 Chapter 2 Definitions General Display Fireworks, 1.3G, cont devices, which are explosive materials, intended for use in fireworks displays and designed to produce audible or visible effects by combustion, deflagration or detonation. Such 1.3G fireworks include, but are not limited to, firecrackers containing more than 130 milligrams (2 grains) of explosive composition, aerial shells containing more than 40 grams of pyrotechnic composition and other display pieces which exceed the limits for classification as 1.4G fireworks. Such

18 Chapter 2 Definitions General Display Fireworks, 1.3G, cont 1.3G fireworks are also described as Fireworks, UN 0335 by DOTn. See OAR (35). Child Foster Care Facilities. Facilities that provide care on a 24-hour basis to more than five children, 2 1/2 years of age or less. Group Home. A facility for social rehabilitation, substance abuse or mental health problems containing a group housing arrangement that Child care facilities for more than five children, 2 ½ years of age or less are now Foster Care facilities no matter how long the child is in the facility. Group Home is a new definition under Group I and R-4 occupancies. By using the term “custodial care” this classifies the residents in these facilities as capable of self-preservation.

19 Chapter 2 Definitions Group Home, con’t provides custodial care but does not provide acute medical care. High-Rise Building. A building with an occupied floor located more than 75 feet ( mm) above the lowest level of fire department vehicle access. Hood. An air-intake device used to capture by entrapment, impingement, adhesion or similar means, grease and similar contaminants before they enter This new definition determines what qualifies as a high-rise building. It is a fairly unique measurement of height and is not based on the definition of “Building Height”. The critical measurement is from the lowest ground location where a fire department will be able to set its fire-fighting equipment to a floor level of occupied floors including roofs. It is not a measurement from grade plan to top of the building.

20 Chapter 2 Definitions Hood, con’t a duct system. Type I. A kitchen hood for collecting and removing grease vapors and smoke. Type II. A general kitchen hood for collecting and removing steam vapor, heat, odors and products of combustion. A definition for Type II hoods. Previous codes only defined Type I hoods and all others were Type II. The primary purpose of a Type II hood is to capture and remove water vapor, waste heat and any products of combustion that might be associated with the heating of the appliance, such as fuel gas combustion. A Type II hood is not intended for grease or smoke removal.

21 Chapter 2 Definitions Hospitals and Mental Psychiatric Hospitals. Facilities buildings or portion thereof used on a 24-hour basis that provides care or treatment for the medical, psychiatric, obstetrical, or surgical treatment of inpatients who care recipients that are incapable of self-preservation. Incapable of Self Preservation. Persons because of age; physical limitations; mental limitations; chemical dependency; or medical treatment cannot respond as an individual to an emergency situation. The word mental was changed to psychiatric and the time limit was removed so a facility that meets this definition and is only used for 6 hours could fall under this definition. A new definition for “Incapable of Self-Preservation”. This definition will go along with the new occupancies introduced by Oregon amendments to eliminate the SR occupancy classification.

22 Chapter 2 Definitions Interior Exit Ramp. An exit component that serves to meet one or more means of egress design requirements, such as required number of exits or access travel distance, and provides for a protected path of egress travel to the exit discharge or public way. Interior Exit Stairway. An exit component that serves to meet one or more means of egress design requirements, such as required number of exits or exit Two new definitions for exit ramps and stairways. To qualify as interior they must be enclosed with a fire-resistance-rated enclosure in order to provide a protected path between the exit access and exit discharge,

23 Chapter 2 Definitions Interior Exit Stairway, cont. access travel distance, and provides for a protected path of egress travel to the exit discharge or public way. Medical Care. Care involving medical or surgical procedures, nursing or for psychiatric purposes. Mortar. A tube from which fireworks shells are fired into the air. See OAR (55). Most medical care persons are likely to be incapable of self-preservation. Another fire works definition that could cause a conflict with the definition in staute or rule.

24 Chapter 2 Definitions Noncombustible. A material that, in the form in which it is used and under the conditions anticipated, does not ignite, burn, support combustion, or release flammable vapors, when subject to fire or heat. Materials that are reported as passing ASTM E 136, Standard Test for Behavior of Materials in a Vertical tube Furnace at 750o C, are considered noncombustible materials. For the purposes of this code any material that does not meet this definition of noncombustible shall be deemed as combustible. The last sentence was added in the 2014 OFC to this Oregon amendment to make it clear that if a material does not meet the definition of noncombustible the it would be classified as combustible.

25 Chapter 2 Definitions Nursing Homes. Nursing homes are long-term care Facilities that provide care on a 24-hour basis, including both intermediate care facilities and skilled nursing facilities, serving more than five persons and where any of the persons are incapable of self-preservation. Occupancy Classifications. For the purposes of this code, certain occupancies are defined as follows: Assembly Group A. Assembly Group A occupancy Again the time limit was removed and the number of occupants was removed. Persons in these facilities are more likely to be incapable of self-preservation.

26 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t includes, among others, the use of a building or structure, or a portion thereof, for the gathering of persons for purposes such as civic, social or religious functions; recreation, food or drink consumption; or awaiting transportation. Exceptions: 1. Small buildings and tenant spaces. A building or tenant space used for assembly purposes with an

27 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t occupant load of less than 50 persons shall be classified as a group B occupancy. Small assembly spaces. The following rooms and spaces shall not be classified as assemble occupancies: 2. A room or space used for assembly purposes with an occupant load of less than 50 persons and accessory to another occupancy shall be classified The definitions for the different types of assembly occupancies have been expanded and instead of exceptions there are now definitions. There are five specific assembly group classifications.

28 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t as a Group B occupancy or as part of that occupancy A room or space used for assembly purposes that is less than 750 square feet (70 m2) in area and accessory to another occupancy shall be classified as a Group B occupancy or as part of that occupancy.

29 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t 4. Associated with Group E occupancies. Assembly areas that are accessory to A room or space used for assembly purposes that are associated with a Group E occupancies occupancy are not considered separate occupancies except when applying the assembly occupancy requirements of Chapter 11 of the International Building Code.

30 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t 5. Accessory with places of religious worship. Accessory religious educational rooms and religious auditoriums with occupant loads of less than 100 are not considered separate occupancies. Assembly occupancies shall include the following: Assembly Group A-1. Assembly uses, usually with fixed seating, intended for the production and viewing of performing arts or motion pictures

31 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t including, but not limited to: Motion picture theaters Symphony and concert halls Television and radio studios admitting an audience Theaters Assembly Group A-2. Assembly uses intended for food and/or drink consumption including, but not

32 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t Banquet halls Casino (gaming areas) Night clubs Restaurants, cafeterias and similar dining facilities (including associated commercial kitchens) Taverns and bars

33 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t Assembly Group A-3. Assembly uses intended for worship, recreation or amusement and other assembly uses not classified elsewhere in Group A, including, but not limited to: Amusement arcades Art galleries Bowling alleys Community halls

34 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t Courtrooms Dance halls (not including food or drink consumption) Exhibition halls Funeral parlors Gymnasiums (without spectator seating) Indoor swimming pools (without spectator seating) Indoor tennis courts (without spectator seating) Lecture halls

35 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t Libraries Museums Places of religious worship Pool and billiard parlors Waiting areas in transportation terminals

36 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t Assembly Group A-4. Assembly uses intended for viewing of indoor sporting events and activities with spectator seating including, but not limited to: Arenas Skating rinks Swimming pools Tennis courts

37 Chapter 2 Definitions Assembly Group A, con’t Assembly Group A-5. Assembly uses intended for participation in or viewing outdoor activities including, but not limited to: Amusement park structures Bleachers Grandstands Stadiums

38 Chapter 2 Definitions Educational Group E. Educational Group E occupancy includes, among others, the use of a building or structure, or a portion thereof, by six or more persons at any time for educational purposes through the 12th grade. Accessory to places of worship. Religious educational rooms and religious auditoriums, which are accessory to places of religious worship in accordance with Section of the International Building Code and have occupant loads of less than Accessory to places of worship was an exception to the general definition of Group A occupancies in previous codes but now has it’s own definition.

39 Chapter 2 Definitions Educational Group E, con’t 100, shall be classified as Group A-3 occupancies. Group E day care facilities. The use of a This group includes buildings and or structures or portions thereof, for educational, supervision or poersonal care services for occupied by more than five children older than 2 ½ years of age shall be classified as an E occupancy who receive educational, supervision or personal care The definition for Group E daycares has been expanded and made more clear.

40 Chapter 2 Definitions Educational Group E, con’t services for less than 24 hours per day. Within places of worship. Rooms and spaces within places of worship providing such care during religious functions shall be classified as part of the primary occupancy. Five and fewer children. A facility having five or

41 Chapter 2 Definitions Educational Group E, con’t fewer children receiving such care shall be classified as part of the primary occupancy. Five or fewer children in a dwelling unit. A facility such as the above within a dwelling unit and having five or fewer children receiving such care shall be cclassified as a Group R-3 occupancy or shall comply with the International Residential Code.

42 Chapter 2 Definitions Occupancy Classifications, con’t Factory Industrial F-1 Moderate-hazard occupancy. (only one change) Food processing and commercial kitchens not associated with restaurants, cafeterias and similar dining facilities Institutional Group I. Institutional Group I occupancy includes, among other, the use of a building or structure, or a portion thereof, in which people are The definition for F-1 food processing occupancy has been expanded and made more distinct.

43 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I, con’t cared for or live in a supervised environment, having physical limitations because of health or age, are harbored for medical treatment, other care or treatment care or supervision is provided to persons who are or are not capable of self-preservation without physical assistance or in which persons are detained for penal or correctional purposes or in which the liberty of the occupant is restricted. The deletions in this definition by Oregon came about because of the new requirements brought forward early from the 2015 IBC to eliminate the SR Appendix.

44 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I, con’t Institutional occupancies shall be classified as Group I-1, I-2, I-3 or I-4. Institutional Group I-1. This occupancy shall include buildings, structures or parts thereof for more than 16 persons, excluding staff, who reside on a 24-hour basis, who because of age, mental disability, or other reasons, live in a supervised residential environment that provides personnel care

45 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-1, con’t Services and receive custodial care. Buildings of Group I-1 shall be classified as one of the occupancy conditions indicated in Condition 1 or Condition 2. The occupants are capable of responding to an emergency situation without physical assistance from staff. This group shall include, but not be limited to, the following: Alcohol and drug centers Again new Group I-1 occupancy conditions to help define what the SR occupancies have changed to. These Oregon amendments came from DHS.

46 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-1, con’t Assisted living facilities Congregate care facilities Convalescent facilities Group Homes Halfway house Residential board and custodial care facilities

47 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-1, con’t Social rehabilitation facilities Condition 1. This occupancy condition shall include buildings in which all persons receiving custodial care who, without any assistance, are capable of responding to an emergency situation to complete building evacuation. This group shall include, but not be limited to, the following: Congregate living facilities

48 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-1, con’t Halfway houses Social rehabilitation facilities Condition 2. This occupancy condition shall include buildings subject to licensure by the Oregon department of Human Services in which there are any persons receiving custodial care who require limited verbal or physical assistance while responding to an emergency situation to complete building evacuation.

49 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-1, con’t This group shall include, but not be limited to, the following: Alcohol and drug centers Assisted living facilities with or without a Memory Care Endorsement Residential care facilities with or without a Memory Care Endorsement

50 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-1, con’t Residential treatment facilities Group homes and facilities Five or fewer persons receiving custodial care. A facility such as the above with five or fewer persons receiving such custodial care shall be classified as Group R-3 or shall comply with the International Oregon Residential Specialty Code in accordance with Section of the International Building Code

51 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-1, con’t provided an automatic sprinkler system is installed in accordance with Section or International Oregon Residential Specialty Code Section P2904 Appendix T. Six to sixteen persons receiving custodial care. A facility such as above, housing at least not fewer than six and not more than 16 persons receiving such custodial care, shall be classified as Group R-4.

52 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-1, con’t A residential facility, or portion thereof, subject to licensure by the state, where personal care is administered for more than 16 persons, whose occupants may require assisted self-preservation, shall be classified as Group SR occupancy and shall comply with Appendix SR of the Oregon Structural Specialty Code. Not needed as Appendix SR has been removed in favor of using Group I-1 and R-4 Condition 1 or 2.

53 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-2. This occupancy shall include buildings and structures used for medical care on a 24-hour basis for more than five surgical, psychiatric, nursing, health or custodial care for persons who are not incapable of self-preservation. This group shall include, but not be limited to, the following: Child Foster care facilities Detoxification facilities Hospitals An occupancy classified in Group I-2 is characterized by three conditions: 1. It is a health care/medical care facility; 2. There is 24-hour-a-day medical supervision, and; 3. More than five persons require physical assistance from staff or others.

54 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-2, con’t Mental hospitals Nursing homes Psychiatric hospitals Five or fewer persons receiving medical care. A facility such as the above with five or fewer persons receiving such medical care shall be classified as Group R-3 or shall comply with the International Any facilities that has the characteristics of a Group I-2 but does not have more than five persons receiving care at any one time is to be classified as a Group r-3 occupancy. This occupancy may be designed and constructed to the provisions of the IRC provided it has a 13D or an ORSC Appendix T sprinkler system.

55 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-2, con’t Oregon Residential Specialty Code provided an automatic sprinkler system is installed in accordance with Section or Section P2904 Appendix T of the International Oregon Residential Specialty Code. A residential facility or portion thereof, subject to licensure by the state, where personal care is administered for more than five persons, whose Again the elimination of the reference to Appendix SR.

56 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-2, con’t occupants may require assisted self-preservation (impractical), shall be classified as a Group SR-2 occupancy and shall comply with Appendix SR of the Oregon Structural Specialty Code. Institutional Group I-4, day care facilities. This group shall include buildings and structures occupied by more than five persons of any age who receive custodial care for less than 24-hours by individual Facilities that contain provisions for custodial care of more than five persons of any age are classified as Group I-4. This includes both Adult day care and Child day care. These facilities are intended to be used for less than 24 hours and are not intended to provide medical supervision. The recipients in these facilities are not expected to respond to an emergency without physical assistance from others.

57 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-4, day care facilities, con’t persons other than parents or guardians, relatives by blood, marriage, or adoption, and in a place other than the home of the person cared for. A facility as the above with five or fewer persons shall be classified as Group R-3 or shall comply with the International Residential Code in accordance with Section of the International Building Code. Place of worship during religious functions are not

58 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-4, day care facilities, con’t included. A facility such as the above with six or fewer persons, or family child care homes (located in a private residence) as defined in the Oregon Structural Specialty Code, Section , shall be classified as a Group R-3 or shall comply with the Oregon Residential Specialty Code in accordance with Section This group shall include, but not be limited to, the following:

59 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-4, day care facilities, con’t Adult day care facility. A facility that provides accommodations for less than 24-hours for more than five unrelated adults and provides supervision and personal care services shall be classified as Group I-4. Exception: Where the occupants are capable of responding to an emergency situation without physical assistance from the staff, the facility shall

60 Chapter 2 Definitions Institutional Group I-4, day care facilities, con’t be classified as Group R-2. Child day care facility. Child care facilities that provide supervision and personal care on less than a 24-hour basis for more than five children 2 ½ years of age or less shall be classified as Group I-4. Exception: Classification as Group E. A child day care facility that provides care for more than five but no more than 100 children 2 ½ years or less of A child care facility in which the number of children whose age does not exceed 2 ½ is greater than five but not more than 100 is permitted to be classified as Group E, provided the children are located in rooms on the level of exit discharge that serve such rooms and all of the rooms have exit doors directly to the exterior. By permitting the facility to be classified as Group E, sprinklers would not be required unless the fire area was greater than 12,000 square feet. But as a Group E panic hardware would be required in rooms and spaces exceeding 50 occupants.

61 Chapter 2 Definitions Child day care facility, con’t age, where the rooms in which the children are cared for are located on a level of exit discharge serving such rooms and each of these child care rooms has an exit door directly to the exterior, shall be classified as Group E. Within a place of religious worship. Rooms and spaces within places of religious worship providing such care during religious functions shall be classified as part of the primary occupancy. Again the exception for religious places.

62 Chapter 2 Definitions Child day care facility, con’t Five or fewer occupants receiving care. A facility having five or fewer persons receiving custodial care shall be classified as part of the primary occupancy. Five or fewer occupants receiving care in a dwelling unit. A facility such as the above within a dwelling unit and having five or fewer persons, or family child care homes (located in a private residence) receiving custodial care shall be Five or fewer can be classified as part of the primary occupancy and five or fewer receiving custodial care in a dwelling unit can be classified as a R-3 and comply with the ORSC. Also family child care in private residences was removed and added as a new definition on its own as indicated in the next slide.

63 Chapter 2 Definitions Child day care facility, con’t classified as a Group R-3 occupancy or shall comply with the International Residential Code. Family Child Care Homes (located in a private residence) as defined in Section 202 shall be classified as a Group R-3 or shall comply with the Residential Code in accordance with Section

64 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R. Residential Group R includes, among others, the use of a building or structure, or a portion thereof, for sleeping purposes when not classified as an Institutional Group I or when not regulated by the International Residential Code in accordance with section of the International Building Code. Residential occupancies shall include the following: Residential Group R-1. Residential occupancies containing sleeping units where the occupants are R occupancies have been better defined.

65 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-1, con’t primarily transient in nature, including Boarding houses (transient) with more than 10 occupants. Congregate living facilities (transient) with more than 10 occupants Hotels (transient) Motels (transient)

66 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-1, con’t Congregate living facilities (transient) with 10 or fewer occupants are permitted to comply with the construction requirements for Group R-3. Residential Group R-2. Residential occupancies containing sleeping units or more than two dwelling units where the occupants are primarily permanent in nature, including: Apartment houses

67 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-2, con’t Boarding houses (nontransient) with more than 16 occupants Congregate living facilities (nontransient) with more than 16 occupants Convents Dormitories Fraternities and sororities

68 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-2, con’t Hotels (nontransient) Live/work units Monasteries Motels (nontransient) Vacation timeshare properties Congregate living facilities with 16 or fewer occupants are permitted to comply with the

69 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-2, con’t construction requirements for Group R-3. Residential Group R-3. Residential occupancies where the occupants are primarily permanent in nature and not classified as Group R-1, R-2, R-4 or I, including: Boarding houses (nontransient) with 16 or fewer occupants

70 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-2, con’t Boarding houses (transient) with 10 or fewer occupants Buildings that do not contain more than two dwelling units. Adult Care facilities that provide accommodations for five six or fewer persons of any age for less than 24-hours receiving care.

71 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-2, con’t Child care facilities that provide accommodations for five or fewer persons of any age for less than 24-hours. Congregate living facilities (nontransient) with 16 or fewer persons. Congregate living facilities (transient) with 10 or fewer occupants

72 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-2, con’t Adult care facilities that provide accommodations for six or fewer persons of any age for less than 24-hours. Child care facilities that provide accommodations for six or fewer persons of any age for less than 24-hours. Care facilities within a dwelling. Adult care and child Care facilities for five or fewer persons R-2 occupancies include adult and child care facilities that are less than 24 hours and six or fewer persons as per DHS.

73 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-2, con’t receiving care that are within a single-family home dwelling are permitted to comply with the International Oregon Residential Specialty Code provided an automatic sprinkler system is installed in accordance with Section or Section P2904 with Appendix T of the International Oregon Residential Specialty Code.

74 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4. Residential occupancies shall include buildings arranged for occupancy as residential care/assisted living facilities including more than five but not more than 16 occupants, excluding staff. Group R-4 occupancies shall meet the requirements for construction as defined for Group R-3, except as otherwise provided for in this code or shall comply with the International Residential Code provided the Again the next few slides in regards to R-4 occupancies have been expanded by in the model code and then amended by Oregon to accommodate the SR occupancies.

75 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4, con’t building is protected by an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section This occupancy shall include buildings, structures or portions thereof for more than five but not more than 16 persons, excluding staff, who reside on a 24-hour basis in a supervised residential environment and receive custodial care. The persons receiving care are capable of self-preservation. Buildings of Group

76 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4, con’t R-4 shall be classified as one of the occupancy conditions indicated in Condition 1 or Condition 2. This group shall include, but not be limited to, the following: Alcohol and drug centers Assisted

77 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4, con’t Convalescent facilities Group homes Halfway houses Residential board and custodial care facilities Social rehabilitation facilities Condition 1. This occupancy condition shall include buildings in which all persons receiving custodial

78 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4, con’t care, who without any assistance, are capable of responding to an emergency situation to complete building evacuation. This group shall include, but not be limited to, the following: Congregate living facilities Halfway houses Condition 2. This occupancy condition shall include

79 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4, con’t buildings subject to licensure by the Oregon Department of Human Services in which there are any persons receiving custodial care who require limited verbal or physical assistance while responding to an emergency situation to complete building evacuation. This group shall include, but not be limited to, the following: Alcohol and drug centers

80 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4, con’t Assisted living facilities with or without a Memory Care Endorsement Residential Care facilities with or without a Memory Care Endorsement Residential treatment facilities Group homes and facilities Social rehabilitation facilities

81 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4, con’t Group R-4 occupancies shall meet the requirements for construction as defined for Group R-3, except as otherwise provided for in the International Building Code. A Group R-4 residential occupancy, or portion thereof, subject to licensure by the state, where personal care is administered for more than five, but not more than 16 persons, whose occupants may

82 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Group R-4, con’t require assisted self-preservation shall be classified as a Group SR 4 occupancy and shall comply with the provisions of Appendix SR of the Oregon Structural Specialty Code. Special Residence Group SR. Special residences for assisted self-preservation (See Oregon Structural Specialty Code, Appendix SR): Group SR-1, SR-2, SR-3 and SR-4.

83 Chapter 2 Definitions Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code. For the purpose of the Oregon Fire Code shall mean the Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code (OSISC) as adopted by OAR Personal Care Service. The care of residents persons who do not require chronic or convalescent medical or nursing care. Personal care involves responsibility for the safety of the resident persons while inside the building. A new definition to describe what the Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code is when referenced in this code. Personal care service has been changed to essentially cover daycare. It does not line up with NFPA 101. NFPA 101 personal care lines up with the IBC “custodial care.”

84 Chapter 2 Definitions Pyrotechnic Special-Effect Material. A chemical mixture used in the entertainment industry to produce visible or audible effects by combustion deflagration or detonation. Such a chemical mixture predominantly consists of solids capable of producing a controlled, self-sustaining and self-contained exothermic chemical reaction that results in heat, gas sound, light or a combination of these effects. The chemical reaction functions without external oxygen. See OAR (78). Another fire works definition deleted to not cause conflict with OARs.

85 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Care/Assisted Living Facilities. A building or part thereof housing persons, on a 24-hour basis, who because of age, mental disability, or other reasons, live in a supervised residential environment which provides personal care services. The occupants are capable of responding to an emergency situation without physical assistance from staff. This classification shall include, but not be limited to, the following: residential board and care facilities, assisted living facilities, halfway houses, Deleted at model level because it was no longer needed based on the amendment and new definitions previously discussed.

86 Chapter 2 Definitions Residential Care/Assisted Living Facilities, con’t group homes, congregate care facilities, social rehabilitation facilities, alcohol and drug abuse centers and convalescent facilities.

87 Chapter 2 Definitions TRAFFIC CALMING DEVICES. Traffic calming devices are designed elements of fire apparatus access roads such as street alignment, installation of barriers, and other physical measures intended to reduce traffic and cut-through volumes, and slow vehicles speeds. New definition for traffic calming devices that were added as a new section

88 Chapter 3 General Requirements
Section 307 Open Burning, Recreational Fires and Portable Outdoor Fireplaces Prohibited open burning. Open burning that is offensive or objectionable because of smoke emissions or when shall be prohibited where atmospheric conditions or local circumstances make such fire hazardous shall be prohibited. Exception: Prescribed burning for the purpose This section now has the subjective language removed and recognizes prescribed burns in wildland areas. This new language at model level eliminated a previous Oregon amendment.

89 Chapter 3 General Requirements
Prohibited open burning, con’t of reducing the impact of wildland fire when authorized by the fire code official Extinguishment authority. When open burning any fire creates or adds to a hazardous situation, or a required permit for open burning has not been obtained, the fire code official is authorized to order the extinguishment by the permit holder, another person responsible or the fire The model revision to specified when a fire code official can require open burning to be extinguished. It was further modified by Oregon to include any fire.

90 Chapter 3 General Requirements
307.3 Extinguishment authority, con’t department of the open burning that creates or adds to a hazardous or objectionable situation operation fire. Section 316 Hazards To Fire Fighters Obstructions on roofs. Wires, cables, ropes, antenna, or other suspended obstructions installed on the roof of a building having a roof A physical guard is required for certain obstructions on roofs with less than 30 degree slope. Under this new requirement a means of identification, a barrier, or some other form of obstruction must be provided when a guy wire, cable, or rope is less than 7 feet above the roof level. There a two exception to this requirement.

91 Chapter 3 General Requirements
316.4 Obstructions on roofs, con’t slope of less than 30 degrees shall not create an obstruction that is less than 7 feet (2133 mm) high above the surface of the roof. Exceptions: 1. Such obstructions shall be permitted where the wire, cable, rope, antenna or suspended obstruction is encased in a white, 2-inch (51 mm) minimum diameter plastic pipe or an

92 Chapter 3 General Requirements
316.4 Obstructions on roofs, con’t approved equivalent. 2. Such obstructions shall be permitted where there is a solid obstruction below such that accidentally walking into the wire, cable, rope, antenna or suspended obstruction is not possible.

93 Chapter 3 General Requirements
Section 317 Rooftop Gardens and Landscaped Roofs General. Rooftop gardens and landscaped roofs shall be installed and maintained in accordance with Sections through and Sections 1505 and of the International Building Code. Section 317 is a new section in the fire code dealing with roof gardens and/or landscaped roofs. The requirements limit the area of roof gardens, require the use of roof assemblies designed for severe fire exposure, and provide for the installation of a standpipe connection. It also sets for the requirements for establishing a maintenance plan for the vegetation installed on roof gardens or landscaped roofs.

94 Chapter 3 General Requirements
317.2 Rooftop garden or landscaped roof size. Rooftop garden or landscaped roof areas shall not exceed 15,625 square feet (1,450 m2) in size for any single area with a maximum dimension of 125 feet (39 m) in length or width. A minimum 6- foot wide (1.8 m) clearance consisting of a Class A-rated roof system complying with ASTM E 108 or UL 790 shall be provided between adjacent rooftop gardens or landscaped roof areas.

95 Chapter 3 General Requirements
317.3 Rooftop structures and equipment clearance. For all vegetated roofing systems abutting combustible vertical surfaces, a Class A-rated roof system complying with ASTM E 108 or UL 790 shall be achieved for a minimum 6-foot-wide (1.8 m) continuous border placed around rooftop structures and all rooftop equipment including, but not limited to, mechanical and machine rooms, penthouses, skylights, roof vents, solar panels, antenna supports, and

96 Chapter 3 General Requirements
317.3 Rooftop structures and equipment clearance, cont. building service equipment Vegetation. Vegetation shall be maintained in accordance with Section and Irrigation. Supplemental irrigation shall be provided to maintain levels of hydration necessary to keep green roof plants alive and to

97 Chapter 3 General Requirement
Irrigation, con’t keep dry foliage to a minimum Dead foliage. Excess biomass, such as overgrown vegetation, leaves and other dead and decaying material, shall be removed at regular intervals not less than two times per year Maintenance plan. The fire code official is

98 Chapter 3 General Requirement
Maintenance plan, con’t authorized to require a maintenance plan for vegetation placed on foofs due to the size of a roof garden, materials used, or when a fire hazard exists to the building or exposure due to the lack of maintenance Maintenance equipment. Fueled equipment stored on roofs and used for the care and maintenance of vegetation on roofs shall be

99 Chapter 3 General Requirement
317.5 Maintenance equipment, con’t stored in accordance with Section 313.

100 Chapter 4 Emergency Planning and Preparedness
Section 408 Use and Occupancy Related Requirements Evacuation diagrams in Group R-2 dormitories. A diagram depicting two evacuation routes shall be posted on or immediately adjacent to every required egress door from each Group R-2 dormitory sleeping unit. This requirement was under R-1 occupancy in prior editions of the fire code which was an incorrect occupancy classification for dormitories. It is now under the correct occupancy classification.

101 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Section 503 Fire Apparatus Access Roads Traffic calming devices. Traffic calming devices shall be prohibited unless approved by the fire code official. New section requiring traffic calming devices. In many juridictions the design and construction of traffic calming devices is the responsibility of the Public Works or Transportation Department. As a result, the fire code official will need to work closely with their engineering staff to ensure traffic calming devices, when approved, have the least impact on response time in emergencies.

102 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Section 506 Key Boxes Key boxes for nonstandardized fire service elevator keys. Key boxes provided for nonstandardized fire service elevator keys shall comply with Section and all of the following: 1. The key box shall be compatible with an existing rapid entry key box system in use in New requirement for nonstandard and standard keys for use by the fire service on elevators and the boxes they are required to be in.There is also a corresponding section in Chapter 6, Section Section 506 address nonstandard keys and requires new elevators installed sue a standard key format.

103 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Key boxes for nonstandardized fire service elevator keys, con’t the jurisdiction and approved by the fire code official. 2. The front cover shall be permanently labeled with the words “Fire Department Use Only – Elevator Keys.” 3. The key box shall be mounted at each elevator

104 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Key boxes for nonstandardized fire service elevator keys, con’t bank at the lobby nearest to the lowest level of fire department access. 4. The key box shall be mounted 5 feet 6 inches (1676 mm) above the finished floor to the right of the elevator bank. 5. Contents of the key box are limited to fire

105 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Key boxes for nonstandardized fire service elevator keys, con’t service elevator keys. Additional elevator access tools, keys and information pertinent to emergency planning or elevator access shall be permitted when authorized by the fire code official. 6. In buildings with two or more elevator banks, a single key box shall be permitted to be used

106 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Key boxes for nonstandardized fire service elevator keys, con’t when such elevator banks are separated by not more than 30 feet (9144 mm). Additional key boxes shall be provided for each individual elevator or elevator bank separated by more than 30 feet (9144 mm). Exception: A single key box shall be permitted to be located adjacent to a fire command

107 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Key boxes for nonstandardized fire service elevator keys, con’t center or the nonstandard fire service elevator key shal be permitted to be secured in a key box used for other purposes and located in accordance with Section

108 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Section 507 Fire Protection Water Supplies Hydrant for standpipe systems. Buildings equipped with a standpipe system installed in accordance with Section 905 shall have a fire hydrant within 100 feet (30 m) of the fire department connections. Exception: The distance shall be permitted to This section provides correlation with NFPA 14 which requires that standpipe fire department connections be placed within 100 feet of a fire hydrant unless otherwise approved by the authority having jurisdiction. Note this requirement is not applicable to sprinkler connections since NFPA 13 does not have a distance requirement to a fire hydrant for connection only serving sprinkler systems.

109 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Hydrant for standpipe systems, con’t exceed 100 feet (30 m) where approved by the fire code official. Section 508 Fire Command Center Required features. Items 1 through 12 and 14 through 18 remain unchanged. Item13 is new as follows:

110 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Required features, con’t 13. An approved Building Information Card that contains, but is not limited to, the following information: 13.1 General building information that includes: property name, address, the number of floors in the building (above and below grade), use and occupancy classification (for mixed uses, identify the different types Supplemental documentation for use by firefighters and emergency responders is now required in buildings that require a fire command center. The BIC is divided into eight different areas and is intended to be formatted as a single form.

111 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Required features, con’t of occupancies on each floor), estimated building population (i.e., day, night, weekend); 13.2 Building emergency contact information that includes: a list of the building’s emergency contacts (e.gg., building manager, building engineer, etc.) and respective work phone number, cell phone

112 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Required features, con’t number, and address; 13.3 Building construction information that includes: the type of building construction (e.g., floors, walls, columns, and roof assembly); 13.4 Exit stair information that includes: number of exit stairs in the building, each exit stair

113 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Required features, con’t designation and floors served, location where each exit stair discharges, exit stairs that are pressurized, exit stairs provided with emergency lighting, each exit stair that allows reentry, exit stairs providing roof access; elevator information that includes: number of elevator banks, elevator bank designation, elevator car numbers and respective floors that they serve, location of

114 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Required features, con’t elevator machine rooms, location of sky lobby, location of freight elevator banks: 13.5 Building services and system information that includes: location of mechanical rooms, location of building mmanagement system, location and capacity of all fuel oil tanks, location of emergency generator, location of natural gas services;

115 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Required features, con’t 13.6 Fire protection system information that includes; location of standpipes, location of fire pump room, location of fire department connections, floors protected by automatic sprinklers, location of different types of automatic sprinkler systems installed (e.g., dry, wet, pre-action, etc.);

116 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Required features, con’t 13.7 Hazardous material information that includes: location of hazardous material, quantity of hazardous material.

117 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Section 509 Fire Protection Equipment Identification and Access Utility identification. Where required by the fire code official, gas shutoff valves, electric meters, service switches and other utility equipment shall be clearly and legibly marked to identify the unit or spce that it serves. Identification shall be made in an approved manner, readily visible and shall be maintained. This section provides the fire code official with the authority to require utility identification for services serving multi-unit/multi-building properties.

118 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Section 510 Emergency Responder Radio Coverage Emergency responder radio coverage in new buildings. All new buildings as described in Section 510.1, shall have approved radio coverage for emergency responders within the building based upon the existing coverage levels of the public safety communication systems of the jurisdiction at the exterior of the building. This section shall not require Section 510 has been modified to include requirements that were formally in Appendix J. A new exception addresses the operation of portable radios in certain facilities. Section references New buildings as described by the Oregon amendment in Section In buildings where emergency responder radio coverage is inadequate, the fire code official cam waive the requirements if radio coverage is not needed or require the installation of a firefighter department communication system complying with Section and NFPA 72.

119 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
510.1 Emergency responder radio coverage in new buildings, con’t improvements of the existing public safety communication systems. Exceptions: exception 1 and 2 remain unchanged. 3 is new. 3. In facilities where emergency responder radio coverage is required and such systems, components or equipment required could have a

120 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
510.1 Emergency responder radio coverage in new buildings, con’t required could have a negative impact on the normal operations of that facility, the fire code official shall have the authority to accept an automatically activated emergency responder radio coverage system. Oregon amendment Section remains unchanged.

121 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
510.2 Emergency responder radio coverage in existing buildings. Existing buildings shall be provided with approved radio coverage for emergency responders as required in Chapter Permit required. A construction permit for the installation of or modification to emergency responder radio coverage systems and related equipment is required as specified in Section refers the reader to Chapter 11 for requirements in existing buildings.

122 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
510.3 Permit required, con’t Section Maintenance performed in accordance with this code is not considered a modification and does not require a permit Technical requirements.Systems components and equipment required to provide emergency responder radio coverage system shall comply with Section through

123 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
510.3 Emergency responder radio coverage in existing buildings. Existing buildings that do not have approved radio coverage for emergency responders within the building shall be equipped with such coverage according to one of the following: 1. Wherever existing wired communication system cannot be repaired or is being replaced, or where not approved in accordance with Section 510.1, Exception 1.

124 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
510.3 Emergency responder radio coverage in existing buildings, con’t 2. Within a time frame established by the adopting authority. This section was moved to Chapter 11, Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings, Section

125 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
System design. The emergency responder radio coverage system shall be designed in accordance with Sections through Amplification systems allowed. Buildings and structures which cannot support the required level of radio coverage shall be equipped with a radiating cable system, a distributed antenna system with Federal

126 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Amplification systems allowed, con’t Communications Commission (FCC) certified signal boosters, or other systems approved by the fire code official in order to achieve the required adequate radio coverage Technical criteria. The fire code official shall maintain a document providing the specific technical information and requirements for the emergency responder radio coverage. This

127 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Technical criteria, con’t document shall contain, but not be limited to, the various frequencies required, the location of radio sites, effective radiated power of radio sites, and other supporting technical information Secondary power. Emergency responder radio coverage systems shall be provided with an approved secondary source of power. The secondary power supply shall be capable of

128 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Secondary power, con’t operating the emergency responder radio coverage system for a period of at least 24 hours. When primary power is lost, the power supply to the emergency responder radio coverage system shall automatically transfer to the secondary power supply Signal booster requirements. If used, signal boosters shall meet the following:

129 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Signal booster requirements, con’t 1. All signal booster components shall be contained in a National Electrical Manufacturer’s Association (NEMA) 4-type waterproof cabinet. 2. Battery sustems used for the emergency power source shall be contained in a NEMA 4-type waterproof cabinet.

130 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Signal booster requirements, con 3. The signal booster system and battery system shall be elctrically supervised and monitored by a supervisory service, or when approved by the fire code official, shall sound an audible signal at a constantly attended location. 4. Equipment shall have FCC certification prior to installation.

131 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Additional frequencies and change frequencies. The emergcny responder radio coverage system shall be capable of modification or expansion in the event frequency changes are required by the FCC or additional frequencies are made available by the FCC Installation requirements. The installation of the public safety radio coverage system shall be in accordance with Sections through

132 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Approval prior to installation. Amplification systems capable of operating on frequencies licensed to any public safety agency by the FCC shall not be installed without prior coordination and approval of the fire code official Minimum qualifications of personnel. The minimum qualifications of the system designer and lead installation personnel shall include: 1. A valid FCC-issued general radio operators license; and

133 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Minimum qualifications of personnel, con’t 2. Certification of in-building system training issued by a nationally recognized organization, school or a certificate issued by the manufacturer of the equipment being installed. These qualifications shall not be required where demonstartion of adequate skills and experience satisfactory to the fire code official is provided.

134 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Acceptance test procedure. When an emergency responder radio coverage system is required, and upon completion of installation, the building owner shall have the radio system tested to ensure that two-way coverage on each floor of the building is a minimum of 90 percent. The test procedure shall be conducted as follows: 1. Each floor of the building shall be divided into a grid of 20 approximately equal test ares.

135 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Acceptance test procedure, con’t 2. The test shall be conducted using a calibrated portable radio of the latest brand and model used by the agency talking through the agency’s radio communications system. 3. Failure of a maximum of two nonadjacent test areas shall not result in a failure of the test. 4. In the event that three of the test areas fail the

136 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Acceptance test procedure, con’t test, in order to be more statistically accurate, the floor shall be permitted to be divided into 40 equal test areas. Failure of a maximum of four nonadjacent test areas shall not result in failure of the test. If the system fails the 40-area test, the system shall be altered to meet 90 percent coverage requirement. 5. A test location approximately in the center of

137 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Acceptance test procedure, con’t each test area shall be selected for the test, with the radio enabled to verify two-way communications to and from the outside of the building through the public agency’s radio communications system. Once the test location has been selected, that location shall represent the entire test area. Failure in the selected test location shall be considered failure of that test area. Additional test locations shall not be permitted.

138 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Acceptance test procedure, con’t 6. The gain values of all amplifiers shall be measured and the test measurement results shall be kept on file with the building owner so that the measurements can be verified during annual tests. In the event that the measurement results become lost, the building owner shall be required to rerun the acceptance test to reestablish the gain values.

139 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Acceptance test procedure, con’t 7. As part of the installation a spectrum analyzer or other suitable test equipment shall be utilized to ensure spurious oscillations are not being generated by the subject signal booster. This test shall be conducted at time of installation and subsequent annual inspections FCC compliance. The emergency responder radio coverage system installation and

140 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
FCC compliance, con’t components shall also comply with all applicable federal regulations including, but not limited to, FCC 47 CFR Part Maintenance. The emergency responder radio coverage system shall be maintained operational at all times in accordance with Sections through

141 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Testing and proof of compliance. The emergency responder radio coverage system shall be inspected and tested annually or whenever structural changes occur including additions or remodels that could materially change the original field performance tests. Testing shall consist of the following: 1. In-building coverage test as described in Section

142 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Testing and proof of compliance, con’t 2. Signal boosters shall be tested to ensure that the gain is the same as it was upon initial installation and acceptance. 3. Backup batteries and power supplies shall be tested under load of a period of one hour to verify that they will properly operate during an actual outage. If within the 1-hour test period the battery exhibits symptons of failure, the

143 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Testing and proof of compliance, con’t test shall be extended for additonal 1-hour periods until the integrity of the battery can be determined. 4. All other active components shall be checked to verify operation within the manufacturer’s specifications. 5. At the conclusion of the testing, a report,

144 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Testing and proof of compliance, con’t which shall verify compliance with Section , shall be submitted to the fire code official Additional frequencies. The building owner shall modify or expand the emergency responder radio coverage system at their expense in the event frequency changes are required by the FCC or additional frequencies are made

145 Chapter 5 Fire Service Features
Additional frequencies, con’t available by the FCC. Prior approval of a public safety radio coverage system on previous frequencies does not exempt this section Field testing. Agency personnel shall have the right to eneter onto the property at any reasonable time to conduct field testing to verify the required level of radio coverage.

146 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Section 604 Emergency and Standby Power Systems Emergecny lighting equipment. Emergency lighting shall be inspected and tested in accordance with Sections through Activation test. An activation test of the emergency lighting equipment shall be completed monthly. Testing requirements for emergency egress lighting are now established in the 2012 IFC/2014 OFC. Section requires a monthly activation test to activate automaticaaly and remain illuminated for 30 seconds.

147 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Activation test, con’t The activation test shall ensure the emergency lighting activates automatically upon normal electrical disconnect and stays sufficirntly illuminated for a minimu of 30 seconds Activation test records. Records shall be maintained on the premises for a minimum of three years and submitted to the fire code official upon request. The record shall include the requires test records to be kept on premise for a minimum of three years.

148 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Activation test records, con’t Location of the emergency lighting tested, whether the unit passed or failed, the date of the test, and the person completing the test Power test. For battery-powered emergency lighting, a power test of the emrgency lighting equipment shall be completed annually. The power test shall operate the emergency lighting for a ,imi,um of 90 minutes and shall remain sufficiently illumintaed for the duration of the test. requires annual test to ensure illumination for 90-minute duration.

149 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Power test record. Records shall be maintained on the premises for a minimum of three years and submitted to the fire code official upon request. The record shall include the location of the emergency lighting tested, whether the unit passed or failed, the date of the test, and the person completing the test. Again records are to be kept on the premises for a minimum of three years.

150 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Section 605 Electrical Equipment, Wiring and Hazards Building-mounted solar photovoltaic power systems. See Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code (OSISC) adopted by OAR Solar photovoltaic power systems shall be installed in accordance with Sections through , the International Building Code and NFPA 70. (The Exception is also deleted) The 2012 IFC included requirements for solar photovoltaic power systems for commercial occupancies. These requirements except for few outdoor installation requirements were deleted as Oregon has it’s own solar code developed through the State Building Code Division by authority of a statute. The Oregon Solar Code includes requirements for both commercial and residential systems.

151 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Marking and labeling. Marking and labeling as is required on interior and exterior direct current (DC) conduit, enclosures, raceways, cable assemblies, junction boxes, combiner boxes and disconnects by the Oregon Electrical Specialty Code, Section shall be maintained. (Sections through are deleted by Oregon) Marking and labeling requirements were not included in the state solar code but it references NFPA 70 (OESC) so the OFC will now refer to the OESC for these new requirements and require them to be maintained.

152 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Ground-mounted solar photovoltaic power systems. Ground-mounted solar photovoltaic power systems shall be installed in accordance with Sections through and NFPA Clearance. A clear, brush-free area of 10 feet (3038 mm) shall be required for grpund-mounted photovoltaic arrays. Section through are new Oregon amendments for outdoor solar systems.

153 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Non-combustible base. A gravel base or other non-combustible base acceptable to the fire code official shall be installed and maintained under and around the installation Security barriers. Fencing, skirting, or other suitable security barriers shall be installed when equired by the fire code official.

154 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Section 607 Elevator Recall and Maintenance Standardized fire service elevator keys. Buildings with elevators equipped with Phase I emergency recall, Phase II emergency in-car operation, or a fire service access elevator shall be equipped to operate with a standardized fire service elevator key approved by the fire code official. Section 607 are the new requirement for all new construction to have standardized elevator keys.

155 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
607.5 Standardized fire service elevator keys, con’t Exception: The owner shall be permitted to place the building’s nonstandardized fire service elevator key in a key box installed in accordance with Section Requirements for standardized fire service elevator keys. Standardized fire service elevator keys shall comply with all of the following:

156 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
requirements for standardized fire service elevator keys, con’t All fire service elevator keys within the jurisdiction shall be uniform and specific for the jurissdiction. Keys shall be cut to a uniform key code. 2. Fire service elevator keys shall be of a patent-protected design to prevent unauthorized duplication.

157 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
requirements for standardized fire service elevator keys, con’t 3. Fire service elevator keys shall be factory restricted by the manufacturer to prevent the unauthorized distribution of key blanks. No uncut key blanks shall be permitted to leave the factory. 4. Fire service elevator keys subject to these

158 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
requirements for standardized fire service elevator keys, con’t rules shall be engraved with the words “DO NOT DUPLICATE.” Access to standardized fire service keys. Access to standardized fire service elevator keys shall be restricted to the following: 1. Elevator owners or their authorized agents.

159 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Access to standardized fire service keys, con’t 2. Elevator contractors. 3. Elevator inspectors of the jurisdiction. 4. Fire code officials of the jurisdiction. 5. The fire department and other emergency response agencies.

160 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Duplication or distribution of keys. No person shall duplicate a standardized fire service elevator key or issue, give, or sell a duplicated key unless in accordance with this code Responsibilty to provide keys. The building owner shall provide up to three standardized fire service elevator keys where requied by the fire code official, upon installation of a standardized fire service key switch or switches in the building.

161 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Section 608 Stationary Storage Battery Systems Scope. Flooded lead-acid, nickel cadmium and VLRA stationary storage battery systems having an electrolyte capacity of more than 50 gallons (189 L) for flooded lead-acid, nickel cadmium and VLRA, of greater than 7 batteries or over 600 amp-hour total capacity, or more than 1,000 pounds (454 kg) for lithium-ion and lithium metal polymer, used for These amendments are to correlate to the requirements in the 2014 Oregon Mechanical Specialty Code. The building codes mechanical division have come across systems of more than 7 batteries of 600 amp-hours that have created problems and did not reach the 50 gallon capacity as stated in model code.

162 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
608.1 Scope, con’t facility standby power, emergency power or uninterrupted power supplies shall comply with this section and table Stationary storage battery system shall not be located in a space with an open combustion source.

163 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
Section 610 Commercial Kitchen Cooking Oil Storage General. Storage of cooking oil (grease) in commercial cooking operations shall comply with Chapter 57. Systems used to store cooking oils in larger than 60-gallon (227 L) aboveground tanks shall also comply with Sections through For purposes of this section, cooking oil shall be classified as a ClassIIIB liquid unless other wise determined by testing. Section 610 is new requirements for storage of cooking oil for commercial kitchens. These requirements address the indoor and outdoor storage of cooking oils. Used cooking oils are a Class III-B combustible liquid.

164 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
610.2 Storage tanks. Cooking oil storage tanks shall be listed in accordance with UL 142 or UL 80, and shall be installed in accordance with Section 5704 and the tank manufacturer’s instructions Other storage components. Cooking oil storage system components including, but not limit to, piping, connections, fittings, valves, tubing and other related components used for the transfer of cooking oil from the cooking appliance Oregon amended Section as Section 5704 references NFPA 30 for design and by removing the UL 142 and UL 80 designation allows for other approved tanks to be used if new ones come on the market.

165 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
610.3 Other storage components, con’t to the storage tank to the discharge point, shall be installed in accordance with Section Tank venting. Normal and emergency venting for cooking oil storage tanks shall terminate outside the buildings as specified in ections and

166 Chapter 6 Building Services and Systems
610.5 Electrical equipment. Electrical equipment used for the operation and heating of the cooking oil storage system shall be listed and comply with NFPA 70.

167 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Section 803 Interior Wall and Ceiling Finish and Trim in Existing Buildings Newly introduced textile wall and ceiling coverings. Newly introduced textile wall and ceiling coverings shall comply with one of the following: 1. The wall or ceiling covering shall have a Class A flame spread index in accordance with Section specifies requirements for newly introduced textile and wall coverings. These requirements are equivalent to the provisions in Section for existing buildings with expanded vinyl wall or ceiling coverings. Under these provisions, the building owner or design professional has three option.

168 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Newly introduced textile wall and ceiling coverings, con’t ASTM E 84 or UL 723, and be protected by autoamtic sprinklers installed in accordance with Section or Test specimen preparing and mounting shall be in accordance with ASTM E The wall covering shall meet the criteria of Section when tested in the

169 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Newly introduced textile wall and ceiling coverings, con’t manner intended for use in accordance with NFPA 265 using the product-mounting system (including adhesive) of actual use. 3. The wall or ceiling covering shall meet the critria of Section when tested in accordance with NFPA 286 unlessthe product-

170 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Newly introduced textile wall and ceiling coverings, con’t mounting system (including adhesive) of actual use Expanded vinyl wall or ceiling coverings. Expanded vinyl wall or ceiling coverings shall comply with the requirements of either Section or one of the following: 1. The wall or ceiling covering shall have a Class Section for new and this section for existing now are correlated.

171 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
803.6 Expanded vinyl wall or ceiling coverings, con’t A flame spread index in accordance with ASTM E 84 or UL 723, and be protected by autoamtic sprinklers installed in accordance with Section or Test specimen preparation and mounting shall be in accordance with ASTM E The wall covering shall meet the criteria of Section when tested in the manner

172 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
803.6 Expanded vinyl wall or ceiling coverings, con’t intended for use in accordance with NFPA 265 using the product-mounting system (including adhesive) of actual use. 3. The wall or ceiling covering shall meet the criteria of Section when tested in accordance with NFPA 286 using the product mounting system (including adhesive) of actual use.

173 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
General. Expanded vinyl wall or ceiling coverings shall comply with the requirements of Section Expanded vinyl wall or ceiling coverings complying with Section shall not be required to comply with Section Compliance alternative. Expanded vinyl wall or ceiling coverings shall be allowed to comply with the requirements for textile wall or ceiling coverings in Section When tested in accordance with These two sections were deleted because of the modifications made to

174 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Compliance alternative, con’t ASTM E 84 or UL 723, test specimen preparation shall be in accordance with ASTM E Section 804 Interior Wall and Ceiling Trim in New and Existing Buildings New interior floor finish. New interior floor finish and floor covering materials in new and existing buildings shall comply with Sections This is a new section dealing with new floor finishes and coverings. This section is identical to Section 804 of the IBC (OSSC).

175 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
through Exception: Floor finishes and coverings of a traditional type, such as wood, vinyl, linoleum or terrazzo, and resilient floor covering materials that are not comprised of fibers Classification. Interior floor finish and floor covering materials required by Section to be of Class I or II materials shall be classified in accordance with NFPA 253.

176 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Classification, con’t The classification referred to herein corresponds to the classifications determined by NFPA 253 as follows: Class I, 0.22 watts/cm2 or greater Testing and identification. Interior floor finish and floor covering materials shall be tested by an approved agency in accordance with NFPA 253 and identified by a hang tag or other suitable method so as to identify the manufacturer or

177 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Testing and identification, con’t supplier and styleand shall indicate the interior floor finish or floor covering classification according to Section Carpet-type floor coverings shall be tested as proposed for use, including underlayment. Test reports confirming the information provided in the manufacturer’s product identification shall be furnished to the fire code official upon request.

178 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Interior floor finish requirements. New interior floor covering materials shall comply with Sections and and interior floor finish materials shall comply with Section Pill test. In all occupancies, new floor covering materials shall comply with requirements of the DOC FF-1 “pill test” (CPSC 16 CFR Part 1630) or of ASTM D 2859.

179 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Minimum critical radiant flux. In all occupancies, new interio floor finish and floor covering materials in enclosures for stairways and ramps, exit passageways, corridors and rooms or spaces not separated from corridors by full-height partitions extending from the floor to the underside of the ceiling shall withstand a minimum critical radiant flux. The minimum critical radiant flux shall not be less than Class I in Groups I-1, I-2 and I-3 and not less than Class II

180 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Minimum critical radiant flux, con’t in Groups A, B, E, H, I-4, M, R-1, R-2 and S. Exception: Where a building is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section or , Class II materials shall be permitted in any area where Class I materials are required and materials complying with DOC FF-1 “pill test” (CPSC 16 CFR Part 1630) or with ASTM D

181 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Minimum critical radiant flux, con’t 2859 shall be permitted in any area where Class II materials are required. Section 805 Upholstered Furniture and Mattresses in New and Existing Buildings Group I-1, board and care facilities Condition 2. The requirements in Section This section was amended to bring forward the new Group I Condition 2 that will be in the 2015 IBC and IFC to mirror NFPA 101 requirements for medicare/medicaid requirements. Again by bringing these forward early allowed Oregon to remove the SR Appendix.

182 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
805.1 Group I-1 Condition 2, con’t through shall apply to board and care facilities classified in Group I-1 Condition 2.

183 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Section 806 Decorative Vegetation in New and Existing Buildings Artificial vegetation. Artificial decorative vegetation shall meet the flame propagation performance criteria of NFPA 701. Meeting the flame propagation performance criteria of NFPA 701 shall be documented and certified by the manufacturer in an approved manner. Alternatively, the artificial An alternative method of evaluating the flame propagation of artificial vegetation or foam plastics and plastic signs in Group A occupancies is now recognized in the fire code.

184 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
806.2 Artificial vegetation, con’t decorative vegetation item shall be tested in accordance with NFPA 289, using the 20 kW ignition source, and shall have a minimum heat release rate of 100 kW.

185 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Section 808 Furnishings Other Than Upholstered Furniture and Mattresses or Decorative Materials in New and Existing Buildings Waste containers with a capacity of 20 gallons or more in Group R-2 college and university dormitories. Waste containers, including their lids, located in Group R-2 college and university dormitories, and with a capacity of This section is similar to Section 808., but is applicable to larger capacity containers (20 gallons or more) and is focused on Group R-2 college and university dormitories. The large waste containers in college and university dormitories should comply with the same requirements as any waste container in Group I-2 and I-3 occupancies. Most nonmetallic waste containers are manufactured from polyethylene which has a fuel value over double that of newsprint and can generate a high heat release rate fire.

186 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
808.2 Waste containers with a capacity of 20 gallons or more in Group R-2 college and university dormitories, con’t 20 gallons (75.7 L) or more, shall be constructed of noncombustible materials or of materials that meet a peak rate of heat release not exceeding 300 kW/m2 when tested in accordance with ASTM E 1354 at an incident heat flux of 50 kW/m2 in the horizontal orientation. Metal wastebaskets and

187 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
808.2 Waste containers with a capacity of 20 gallons or more in Group R-2 college and university dormitories, con’t Other metal waste containers with a caoacity of 20 gallons (75.7 L) or more shall be listed in accordance with UL 1315 and shall be provided with a noncombustible lid. Portable containers exceeding 32 gallons (121 L) shall be stored in an area classified as a waste and linen collection

188 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
808.2 Waste containers with a capacity of 20 gallons or more in Group R-2 college and university dormitories, con’t room constructed in accordance with Table 509 of the International Building Code Combustible lockers. Where lockers constructed of combustible materials are used, the lockers shall be considered interior finish and This new provision helps to ensure that certain building components will not significantly contribute to the growth of an unwanted fire. This section now requires lockers used in schools, sports venues, gymnasiums, or other occupancies be evaluated as an interior finish component. Plastic lockers constructed under these provisions must meet the requirements of Table for flame spread and smoke production. And of course there is an exception for wood and noncombustible materials.

189 Chapter 8 Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
808.4 Combustible lockers, con’t shall comply with Section 803. Exception: Lockers constructed entirely of wood and noncombustible materials shall be permitted to be used wherever interior finsih materials are required to meet a Class C classification in accordance with Section

190 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Section 901 General Fire areas. Where buildings, or portions thereof, are divided into fire areas so as not to exceed the limits established for requiring a fire protection system in accordance with this chapter, such fire areas shall be separated by fire barriers constructed in accordance with Section 707 of the International Building Code or This section provides specific guidance on how a building needs to be divided into fire areas in order to avoid requiring a fire protection system to be installed.

191 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Fire areas, con’t horizontal assemblies constructed in accordance with Section 711 of the International Building Code, or both, having a fire-resistance rating of not less than that determined in accordance with Table of the International Building Code Pump and riser room size. Fire pump and automatic sprinkler system riser rooms shall be Section established new requirements to ensure rooms housing fire protection system risers or fire pumps have adequate space to facilitate their maintenance. This section does not require the construction of a room but if a room is provided these construction requirements must be followed.

192 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Pump and riser room size, con’t designed with adequate space for all equipment necessary for the installation, as defined by the manufacturer, with sufficient working space around the stationary equipment. Clearances around equipment to elements of permanent construction, including other installed equipment and appliances, shall be sufficient to allow inspection, service, repair or replacement without

193 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Pump and riser room size, con’t removing such elements of permanent construction or disabling the function of a required fire-resistance-rated assembly. Fire pump and automatic sprinkler system riser room shall be provided with a door(s) and an unobstructed passageway large enough to allow removal of the largest piece of equipment.

194 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
901.9 Termination of monitoring service. For fire alarm systems required to be monitored by this code, notice shall be made to the fire code official whenever alarm monitoring services are terminated. Notice shall be made in writing, to the fire code official by the monitoring service provider being terminated. Notice to the fire code official is now required when an alarm monitoring service is terminated or changed. The business providing the monitoring service is required to notify the fire code official.

195 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Section 903 Automatic Sprinkler Systems Group B Ambulatory health care facilities. An automatic sprinkler system shall be installed throughout all fire areas the entire floor containing an Group B ambulatory health care facility occupancy when where either of the following conditions exist at any time: 1. Four or more care recipients are incapable of self- Under the 2012 IFC (2014 OFC), automatic sprinkler protection is now required to be extended throughout the entire floor where the ACF is located, not just its fire area. In addition, where the ACF is located on a floor other than the level of exit discharge, the automatic sprinkler system is required on the level of exit discharge and all of the floors between it and the ACF. One item that may create confusion was the revision to both the base paragraph and the addition of a new second paragraph that appears beneath the two numbered items. The two provisions should be viewed as requiring the same thing: that the level of exit discharge and any other floor level between the ACF and the level of exit discharge is required to be sprinklered. (This resulted from two different code changes that meant the same thing and one was unnecessary.

196 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group B Ambulatory health care facilities, con’t preservation , whether rendered incapable by staff or staff has accepted responsibility for care recipients already incapable. 2. One or more care recipients who that are incapable of self-preservation are located at other than the level of exit discharge serving such an occupancy facility.

197 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group B Ambulatory health care facilities, con’t In buildings where ambulatory care is provided on levels other than the level of exit discharge, an automatic sprinkler system shall be installed throughout the entire floor where such care is provided as well as all floors below, and all floors between the level of ambulatory care and the nearest level of exit discharge including the level of exit discharge.

198 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group F-1. An automatic sprinkler system shall be provided throughout all buildings containing a Group F-1 occupancy where one of the following conditions exists: A Group F-1 fire area exceeds 12,000square feet (1115 m2). A Group F-1 fire area is located more than three stories above grade plane. The combined area of all Group F-1 fire areas on

199 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group F-1, con’t all floors, including any mezzanines, exceeds 24,000 square feet (2230 m2). 4. A Group F-1 occupancy used for the manufacture of upholstered furniture or mattresses exceeds 2,500 square feet (232 m2). Automatic sprinkler systems are now required in occupancies where upholstered furniture or mattresses are manufactured, stored or displayed.

200 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group I. An automatic sprinkler system shall be provided throughout buildings with a Group I fire area. Exceptions: 1. An automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section shall be allowed in Group I-1 Condition 1 facilities. 2. An automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section shall be allowed in Group I-1 facilities when in This section was amended by Oregon to include the new Group I-1 Condition1. It keeps NFPA 13 required for I-1 Condition 2. Matching Oregon’s old SR 1 and SR 2 requirements that have been both moved to I-1 Condition 2.

201 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group I, con’t compliance with all of the following: 2.1 A hydraulic design information sign is located on the system riser; 2.2 Exception 1 of Section is not applied; and 2.3 Systems shall be maintained in accordance with the requirements of Section

202 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group I, con’t An automatic sprinkler system is not required where Group I-4 day care facilities are at the level of exit discharge and where every room where care is provided has at least one exterior exit door In buildings where Group I-4 day care is provided on levels other than the level of exit discharge, an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section shall be Model code exempted all day cares from sprinklers if the facilitlty is at the level of exit discharge and every room has an exterior exit but Oregon choose to limit it to Group I-4 day cares.

203 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group I, con’t shall be installed on the entire floor where care is provided and all floors between the level of care and the level of exit discharge, all floors below the level of exit discharge, other than areas classified as an open parking garage Group M. An automatic sprinkler system shall be provided throughout buildings containing a

204 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group M, con’t Group M occupancy where one of the following conditions exists: A Group M fire area exceeds 12,000 square feet (1115 m2). A Group M fire area is located more than three stories above grade plane. The combined area of all Group M fire areas on

205 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group M, con’t all floors , including any mezzanines, exceeds 24,000 square feet (2230 m2). 4. A Group M occupancy is used for the display and sale of upholstered furniture or mattresses exceeds 5,000 square feet (464 m2). See Oregon amendment Model code added a square foot requirement for this occupancy but that still did not make it any easier to understand or make it reasonable for owners and BCD was going to delete this requirement altogether. FM Trabue form Albany Fire worked nonstop to come up with a sprinkler requirement that was agreeable with the fire service and the building folks. See Section

206 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Display and sale of upholstered furniture and mattresses. An automatic sprinkler system shall be provided throughout the fire area of a Group M occupancy used for the display and sale of upholstered furniture or mattresses with an aggregate display area exceeding 5,000 square feet (464 m2) Group R. An automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section shall be uses the same 5,000 square feet requirement as model language only Oregon refers it to a fire area and it has to be an aggregate square footage.

207 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group R, con’t provided throughout all buildings with a Group R fire area Group R-3 or R-4 congregate residences. An automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section shall be permitted in Group R-3 or R-4 congregate living facilities with 16 or fewer residents. R-4 was deleted from this section and two new section and cover the new R-4 Condition 1 and Condition 2 occupancies. Again these changes allow the SR Appendix to be deleted.

208 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group R-4 Condition 1. An automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with shall be permitted in Group R-4 Condition Group R-4 Condition 2. An automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with shall be permitted in Group R-4 Condition 2. Attics shall be protected in accordance with Section or

209 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Attics used for living purposes, storage or fuel fired equipment. Attics used for living purposes, storage or fuel fired equipment shall be protected throughout with an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Attics not used for living purposes, storage or fuel fired equipment. Attics not used for living purposes, storage or fuel fired These are existing SR requirements that are being continued.

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Attics not used for living purposes, storage or fuel fired equipment, con’t equipment shall be protected in accordance with one of the following; Attic protected throughout by a heat detector system arranged to activate the building fire alarm system in accordance with Section Attics constructed of noncombustible materials.

211 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Attics not used for living purposes, storage or fuel fired equipment, con’t 3. Attics constructed of fire-retardent-treated wood framing complying with Section of the Oregon Structural Specialty Code. 4. The automatic fire sprinkler system shall be extended to provide protection throughout the attic space.

212 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Care facilities. An automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section shall be permitted in care facilities with 5 or fewer individuals in a single-family dwelling Group S-1. An automatic sprinkler system shall be provided throughout all building containing a Group S-1 occupancy where one of the following conditions exists: Care facilities in Group R-4 occupancies with five or fewer individuals and in a single family dwelling are allowed to be protected with a 13D and ORSC Appendix T sprinkler system.

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Group S-1, con’t A Group S-1 fire area exceeds 12,000 square feet (1115 m2). A Group S-1 fire area is located more than three stories above grade plane. The combined area of all Group S-1 fire areas on all floors, including any mezzanines, exceeds 24,000 square feet (2230 m2). A group S-1 fire area used for the storage of

214 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group S-1, con’t commercial trucks or buses where the fire area exceeds 5,000 square feet (464 m2). 5. A Group S-1 occupancy used for the storage of upholstered furniture or mattresses exceeds 2,500 feet (232 m2) Basements. Where any portion of a basement is located more than 75 feet ( mm) from openings required by Section , or Again a square footage was added to this occupancy group if upholstered furniture or mattresses are stored.

215 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Basements, con’t Where walls, partitions or other obstructions are installed that restrict the application of water from hose streams, the basement shall be equipped throughout with an approved automatic sprinkler system Rubbish and linen chutes. An automatic sprinkler system shall be installed at the top of Basements that are modified by the addition of a wall, partition, or fixture that can obstruct fire streams will require automatic sprinkler protection. This new requirement may introduce a number of issues for jurisdictions. An example is a basement may add a urinal after the C of O is issued and now because urinals require partitions this partition will now require the basement to be sprinklered A five foot bookcase or a five foot-high partition wall would now require this basement to be sprinklered.

216 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Rubbish and linen chutes, con’t rubbish and linen chutes and in their termination rooms. Chutes extending through three or more floors shall have additional sprinkler heads installed within such chutes at alternate floors and at the lowest intake. Where a rubbish chute extends through a building more than one floor below the lowest intake, the extension shall have sprinklers installed that are recessed from the drop area of Automatic sprinkler protection requirements for rubbish and linen chutes are clarified and improved. This section was revised to more closely correlate with the requirements in Chapter 21 of NFPA 13 and NFPA 82.

217 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Rubbish and linen chutes, con’t the chute and protected from freezing in accordance with Section Such sprinklers shall be installed at alternate floors beginning with the second level below the last intake and ending with the floor above the discharge. Chute sprinklers shall be accessible for servicing.

218 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
NFPA 13D sprinkler systems. Where allowed, Automatic sprinkler systems installed in one and two-family dwellings, Group R-3, and R-4 congregate living facilities Condition 1 and townhouses shall be permitted to be installed throughout in accordance with NFPA 13D Secondary water supply. An automatic secondary on-site water supply having a capacity not less than equal to the hydraulically calculated This modification allows 13D systems in R-3 and the new R-4 Condition1 occupancies. You could also use Appendix T from the ORSC instead of a 13D system. An secondary water supply is required for high-rises and now it must be designed to operate automatically.

219 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Secondary water supply, con’t sprinkler demand, including the hose stream requirement, shall be provided for high-rise buildings in Seismic Design Category C, D, E or F as determined by the International Building Code. An additional fire pump shall not be required for the secondary water supply unless needed to provide the minimum design intake pressure at the suction side of the pump supplying the automatic does not require a second fire pump in high-rise buildings located in the indicated seismic design categories unless the water supply cannot supply the minimum suction pressure necessary to supply the hydraulic demand.

220 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Secondary water supply, con’t sprinkler system. The secondary water supply shall have a duration of not less than 30 minutes as determined by the occupancy hazard classification in accordance with NFPA 13. Exception: Existing buildings. The exception recognizes the infeasibility of requiring a secondary water supply in existing high-rise buildings.

221 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Section 904 Alternative Automatic Fire-Extinguishing Systems Cerification of service personnel for fire-extinguishing equipment. Service personnel providing or conducting maintenance on automatic fire-extinguishing systems, other than automatic sprinkler systems, shall posses a valid certificate issued by an approved organization for the type of system and work performed. Personnel who perform maintenance on portable fire extinguishers or alternative fire-extinguishing systems must be certified by the jurisdiction or other approved organization. Qualifications for individuals who service portable fire extinguishers are established in NFPA 10. Several organizations offer certifications that will conform to code officials that individuals are qualified. The ICC in conjunction with the National Association of Fire Equipment Distributors offer certifications . The national Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies offers four progressive levels of certifications and most manufacturers offer corporate certifications.

222 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Actuation. Automatic fire-extinguishing systems shall be automatically actuated and provided with a manual means of actuation in accordance with Section Where more than one hazard could be simultaneously involed in fire due to their proximity, all hazards shall be protected by a single system designed to protect all hazards that could become involved. Exception: Multiple systems shall be permitted This is a modification to this section of code to require when two or more alternative automatic fire-extinguishing systems are required to protect a hazard, all of the systems must be designed to simultaneously operate. This modification now correlates with the requirements of NFPA 17.

223 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Actuation, con’t to be installed if they are designed to operate simultaneously. Section 905 Standpipe Systems Rooftop gardens and landscaped roofs. Buildings or structures that have rooftop requires that if the building is equipped with a standpipe system, whether or not such systems are required, it must be extended to a roof containing a garden or that is landscaped.

224 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Rooftop gardens and landscaped roofs, con’t gardens or landscaped roofs and that are equipped with a standpipe system shall have the standpipe system extended to the roof level on which the rooftop garden or landscaped roof is located Location of Class I standpipe hose connections. Class I standpipe hose connections 905.4 Requirements for Class I standpipe rooftop connections and Open mall buildings were clarified. See explanation in the 2012 IFC Code and Commentary.

225 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
905.4 Location of Class I standpipe hose connections, con’t shall be provided in all of the following locations: 1. In every required stairway, a hose connection shall be provided for each floor level above or below grade. Hose connections shall be located at an intermediate floor level landing between floors, unless otherwise approved by the fire code official.

226 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
905.4 Location of Class I standpipe hose connections, con’t 2. On each side of the wall adjacent to the exit opening of a horizontal exit. Exception: Where floor areas adjacent to a horizontal exit are reachable from exit stairway hose connections by a 30-foot (9144 mm) hose stream from a nozzle attached to 100 feet

227 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
905.4 Location of Class I standpipe hose connections, con’t ( mm) of hose, a hose connection shall not be required at the horizontal exit. 3. In every exit passageway, at the entrance from the exit passageway to other areas of a building. Exception: Where floor areas adjacent to an

228 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
905.4 Location of Class I standpipe hose connections, con’t exit passageway are reachable from exit stairway hose connections by a 30-foot (9144 mm) hose stream from a nozzle attached to 100 feet ( mm) of hose, a hose connection shall not be required at the entrance from the exit passageway to other areas of the building.

229 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
905.4 Location of Class I standpipe hose connections, con’t 4. In covered mall buildings, adjacent to each exterior public entrance to the mall and adjacent to each entrance from an exit passageway or exit corridor to the mall. In open mall buildings, adjacent to each public entrance to the mall at the perimeter line and adjacent to each entrance from an exit passageway or exit corridor to the mall.

230 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
905.4 Location of Class I standpipe hose connections, con’t 5. Where the roof has a slope less than four units vertical in 12 units horizontal (33.3-percent slope), each standpipe shall be provided with a hose connection located either on the a hose connection shall be located to serve the roof or at the highest landing of a stairway with stair access to the roof provided in accordance with

231 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
905.4 Location of Class I standpipe hose connections, con’t Section An additional hose connection shall be provided at the top of the most hydraulically remote standpipe for testing purposes. 6. Number 6 remained unchanged.

232 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Section 906 Portable Fire Extinguishers Certification of service personnel for portable fire extinguishers. Service personnel providing or conducting maintenance on portable fire extinguishers shall posses a valid certificate issued by an approved governmental agency, or other approved organization for the type of work performed. Personnel who perform maintenance on portable fire extinguishers or alternative fire-extinguishing systems must be certified by the jurisdiction or other approved organization. Qualifications for individuals who service portable fire extinguishers are established in NFPA 10. Several organizations offer certifications that will conform to code officials that individuals are qualified. The ICC in conjunction with the National Association of Fire Equipment Distributors offer certifications . The national Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies offers four progressive levels of certifications and most manufacturers offer corporate certifications.

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Section 907 Fire Alarm and Detection Systems Group A. A manual fire alarm system that activates the occupant notification system in accordance with Section shall be installed in Group A occupancies having an where the occupant load of due to the assembly occupancy is 300 or more. Group A occupancies not separated from one another in accordance with Section The intent of this change is to clarify what occupant load is appropriate to use when determining the fire alarm requirements. The provisions of this section address three separate situations. The three situations are (a) where an assembly occupancy and another occupancy are involved, (b) where multiple assembly areas exist in a building and (c) where the assembly use occurs in and is part of a group E occupancy.

234 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group A, con’t of the International Building Code shall be considered as a single occupancy for the purposes of applying this section. Portions of Group E occupancies occupied for assembly purposes shall be provided with a fire alarm system as required for the Group E occupancy, installed in accordance with section and the occupant notification appliances will activate throughout the In situations where an assembly area and another occupancy are involved, the code will now specify that it is the occupant load “due to the assembly occupancy” that would need to be 300 or more before the manual fire alarm is required. In buildings that contain multiple assembly areas, the second portion of the code will require that the aggregate occupant load of the assembly areas is used unless the spaces are separated as required by IBC Section The last portion of this section use is a part of a Group E occupancy, the fire alarm requirements are to be determined by the Group E requirements.

235 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group A, con’t notification zones upon sprinkler water flow Emergency voice/alarm communication system captions. Stadiums, arenas and grandstands required to caption audible public announcements shall be in accordance with Section Mass notification fire alarm signals in large stadiums, arenas and grandstands require captioned messages. More on this when we get to Section

236 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group E. A manual fire alarm system that activates initiates the occupant notification system signal utilizing an emergency voice/alarm communication system meeting the requirements of Section and installed in accordance with Section shall be installed in Group E occupancies. When automatic sprinklers systems or smoke detectors are installed, such systems or detectors shall be connected to the building fire alarm system. An emergency voice/alarm communications system is now required in Group E occupancies with an occupant load of 30 or more. Because of lockdown plan implementation emergency voice/alarm communication systems are prescribed for group E occupancies.

237 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group E, con’t Exceptions: 1. A manual fire alarm system is not required in Group E occupancies with an occupant load of less than or less. 2. Manual fire alarm boxed are not required in Group E occupancies where all the following apply: Because of the reduced occupant threshold, this provision could require the installation of a system in portable classrooms.

238 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group E, con’t 2.1 Interior corridors are protected by smoke detectors. 2.2 Auditoriums, cafeterias, gymnasiums and similar areas are protected by heat detectors or other approved detection devices. 2.3 Shops and laboratories involving dusts or vapors are protected by heat detectors or

239 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group E, con’t other approved detection devices. 2.4 The capability to activate the evacuation signal from a central point is provided. 2.5 In buildings where normally occupied spaces are provided with a two way communication system between such spaces and a constantly attended receiving station from where a general

240 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group E, con’t evacuation alarm can be sounded, except in locations specifically designated by the fire code official. 3. Manual fire alarm boxes shall not be required in Group E occupancies where the building is equipped throughout with an approved automatic sprinkler system installed in

241 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group E, con’t accordance with Section , the notification appliances emergency voice/alarm communication system will activate on sprinkler water flow and manual activation is provided from a normally occupied location Group I-1. An automatic smoke detection system shall be installed in corridors, waiting areas

242 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group I-1, con’t open to corridors and habitable spaces other than sleeping units and kitchens. The system shall be activated in accordance with Section Exceptions: 1. Smoke For Group I-1 Condition 1 smoke detection in habitable spaces is not required This is an Oregon amendment to replace the SR Appendix.

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Group I-1, con’t where the facility is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section Smoke detection is not required for exterior balconies.

244 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
& Group I-2. Previous Oregon amendments have been deleted from these sections and returned to model language Group R-2 college and university buildings. An automatic smoke detection system that activates the occupant notification system in accordance with Section shall be installed in Group R-2 college and university buildings in the following locations: A smoke detection system, tied into the occupant notification system is now required in certain public and common spaces of Group R-2 college and university buildings, and the required smoke alarms within individual dwelling and sleeping units must be interconnected with the building’s fire alarm and detection system. This requirement applies only to buildings owned by the college or university and does not apply to privately owned facilities that may be used as housing for college students.

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Group R-2 college and university buildings, con’t Common spaces outside of dwelling units and sleeping units. Laundry rooms, mechanical equipment rooms, and storage rooms. All interior corridors serving sleeping units or dwelling units.

246 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group R-2 college and university buildings, con’t Required smoke alarms in dwelling units and sleeping units in Group R-2 college and university buildings shall be connected with the fire alarm system in accordance with NFPA 72. Exception: An automatic smoke detection system is not required in buildings that do not

247 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group R-2 college and university buildings, con’t have interior corridors serving sleeping units or dwelling units and where each sleeping unit or dwelling unit either has a means of egress door opening directly to an exterior exit access that leads directly to an exit or a means of egress door opening directly to an exit.

248 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Interconnection. Where more than one smoke alarm is required to be installed within an individual swelling unit or sleeping unit in Group R 1, R-2, R-3 or R-4 I-1 occupancies, the smoke alarms shall be interconnected in such a manner that the activation of one alarm will activate all of the alarms in the individual unit. Physical interconnecting of smoke alarms shall not be required where listed wireless alarms are installed and all alarms sound upon activation of one alarm. The alarm shall be The smoke alarm interconnection requirements are now applicable to Group I-1 occupancies and include allowances for use of wireless alarms.

249 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Interconnection, con’t clearly audible in all bedrooms over background noise levels with all intervening doors closed Protection of fire alarm control unit. In areas that are not continuously occupied, a single smoke detector shall be provided at the location of each fire alarm control unit, notification appliance circuit power extenders and supervising station Fire alarm control units require protection using an approved smoke detector. Even if the building is sprinklered. This now correlates with NFPA 72. In rooms or spaces housing a fire alarm control unit protected throughout by a smoke detection system does not require a additional detector just for the fire alarm control unit.

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Protection of fire alarm control unit, con’t transmitting equipment. Exceptions: Here ambient conditions prohibit installation of smoke detector, a heat detector shall be permitted. The smoke detector shall not be required

251 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Protection of fire alarm control unit, con’t where the building is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section or Audible alarms. Audible alarm notification appliances shall be provided and emit a distinctive sound that is not to be used for any purpose other that that of a fire alarm.

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Audible alarms, con’t Exceptions : Visible alarm notification appliances shall be allowed in lieu of audible alarm notification appliances in critical care areas of group I-2 occupancies. 2. Where provided, audible notification appliances located in each occupant evacuation elevator lobby in accordance with section of the International Exception 2 is intended to address the concern that automatic emergency voice/alarm messages do not interfere with operation of the two-way communication associated with the occupant evacuation elevators. Live voice messages would be appropriate in the lobbies.

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Audible alarms, con’t Building Code shall be connected to a separate notification zone for manual paging only Average sound pressure. The audible alarm notification appliances shall provide a sound pressure level of 15 decibels (dBA) above the average ambient sound level or 5 dBA above the The strength of audible fire alarm notification devices now must meet a minimum sound-pressure level. This modification now correlates the IFC with NFPA 72.

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Average sound pressure, con’t maximum sound level having a duration of at least 60 seconds, which ever is greater, in every occupiable space within the building. The minimum sound pressure levels shall be: 75 dBA in occupancies in Group R and I-1; 90 dBA in mechanical equipment rooms; and 60 dBA in other occupancies.

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Emergency voice/alarm communication caption. Where stadiums, arenas and grandstands are required to caption audible public announcements in accordance with Section of the International Building Code, the emergency voice/alarm communication system shall also be captioned. Prerecorded or live emergency captions shall be from an approved location constantly attended by personnel trained to respond to an emergency. This requirement came into the code because a 2008 U.S. federal court case. The court ruled that persons with hearing impairment who attend events at stadiums, grandstands, and arenas require a means of equivalent communications in lieu of the public address system.

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Group R-2. In Group R-2 occupancies required by Section 907 to have a fire alarm system, all dwelling units and sleeping units shall be provided with the capability to support visible alarm notification appliances in accordance with Chapter 10 of ICC A Such capability shall be permitted to include the potential for future interconnection of the building fire alarm system with the unit smoke alarms, replacement of audible appliances with combination audible/visible appliances, or future

257 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group R-2, con’t extension of the existing wiring from the unit smoke alarm locations to required locations for visible appliances, visual alarms shall be provided within common and public areas, but are not required within individual dwelling units. This is an existing Oregon amendment in the OSSC that was never correlated to the OFC. That is why it is shown as a new amendment in the 2014 OFC.

258 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Section 908 Emergency Alarm Systems Carbon monoxide alarms. Approved carbon monoxide alarms in new buildings and structures shall be provided in the locations described in Sections and Carbon monoxide alarms. Group I. Group I or R occupancies located in a building containing Carbon monoxide alarms are now required in Group R and I occupancies. Oregon has amended this section because we already had requirements for Group R occupancies that were mandated by the 2011 legislature. The requirements for Group I occupancies are model code and the requirements for Group R occupancies are carried forward from the rules that were written previously. Section and are new for I occupancies and Section through are the existing requirements for R occupancies.

259 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Carbon monoxide alarms. Group I, con’t a fuel-burning appliance or in a building which has an attached garage shall be equipped with single-station carbon monoxide alarms. The carbon monoxide alarms shall be listed as complying with UL 2034 and be installed and maintained in accordance with NFPA 720 and the manufacturer’s instructions. An open parking garage, as defined in Chapter 2 of the

260 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Carbon monoxide alarms. Group I, con’t International Building Code, or an enclosed parking garage ventilated in accordance with ection 404 of the International Mechanical Code shall not be considered an attached garage. Exception: Sleeping units or dwelling units which do not themselves contain a fuel-burning appliance or have an attached garage, but which

261 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Carbon monoxide alarms. Group I, con’t are located in a building with a fuel-burning appliance or an attached garage, need not be equipped with single-station carbon monoxide alarms provided that: 1. The sleeping unit or dwelling unit is located more than one story above or below any story which contains a fuel-burning applaince or an

262 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Carbon monoxide alarms. Group I, con’t attached garage; 2. The sleeping unit or dwelling unit is not connected by duct work or ventilation shafts to any room containing a fuel-burning appliance or to an attached garage; and 3. The building is equipped with a common area carbon monoxide alarm system.

263 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Carbon monoxide detection systems. Carbon monoxide detection systems, which include carbon monoxide detectors and audible notification appliances, installed and maintained in accordance with this section for carbon monoxide alarms and NFPA 720 shall be permitted. The carbon monoxide detectors shall be listed as complying with UL 2075.

264 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Carbon monoxide alarms. Group R. For new construction, approved single station Carbon monoxide alarms or a household carbon monoxide detection system shall be installed in Group R Occupancies. each of the following: 1. Group R Occupancies identified in Section 310 of the International Building Code, and 2. Group SR-3 and Sr-4 Occupancies identified in Appendix SR of the International Building Code.

265 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Section through remain unchanged Where required in existing affected occupancies. Where a new carbon monoxide source is introduced or work requiring a structural permit occurs in existing Group R occupancies, as identified in Section 908.1, carbon monoxide alarms shall be provided in accordance wwith Section through of this code.

266 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Where required in existing affected occupancies, con’t The exception to remains unchanged and Section remains unchanged.

267 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Section 910 Smoke and Heat Vents Group I-3. Emergency ventilation. Group I-3, resident housing areas shall be equipped with Smoke and heat venting by one of the following: 1. A manually operated mechanical system capable of at least six air changes per hour of exhaust with mechanical or natural maakeup air. This is a new amendment in the 2014 OFC but has been an existing amendment in the OSSC for some time. It comes from OSSC, Section and was brought forward into the OFC for information for deputies and others that do inspections on residential housing units of Group I-3 occupancies.

268 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Group I-3. Emergency ventilation, con’t 2. Roof vents capable of being manually operated, installed in accordance with their listings and Section The maximum center-to-center spacing between vents shall be 100 feet ( mm) and the venting ration of effective area of vent openings to floor area shall be 1:150.

269 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
910.5 Maintenance. Smoke and heat vents and mechanical smoke exhaust systems shall be maintained in an operative condition in accordance with NFPA 204. Fusible links shall be promptly replaced whenever fused, damaged or painted. Smone and heat vents and mechanical smoke exhaust systems shall not be modified. New requirement in the IFC requiring smoke and heat vents be maintained in accordance with NFPA 204. Ensuring that these devices are inspected, tested and maintained in proper working order by the building’s owner has positive effects on fire-fighter safety.

270 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Section 914 Fire Protection Based on Special Detailed Requirements of use and Occupancy Fire suppression. Aircraft hangers shall be provided with a fire suppression system designed in accordance with NFPA 409, based upon the classification for the hanger given in Table

271 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Fire suppression, con’t Exceptions: 1. When a fixed base operator has separate repair facilities on site, Group II hangars operated by a fixed base operator used for storage of transient aircraft only shall have a fire suppression system, but the system shall be exempt from foam requirements. 2. Group I hangars as defined in NFPA 409,

272 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Fire suppression, con’t which exceed 40,000 square feet (3716 m2), but have an aircraft access door height less than 28 feet (8534 mm), and do not have provisions for housing aircraft with a tail height over 28 feet (8534 mm), and without major maintenance or overhaul are exempt from foam suppression requirements if they have an automatic sprinkler protection with a density of 0.25 gal/min (0.016 L/s). Existing Oregon amendment in the OSSC has been removed.

273 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Fire suppression, con’t 2. Aircraft hangars that have an aircraft access door height less than 28 feet (8534 mm), and do not have provisions for housing aircraft with a tail height over 28 feet (8534 mm), are exempt from foam requirements provided the building complies with all the following criteria: New amendment in the OSSC allows a bit more flexibility for smaller airports yet it ensures that smaller fire departments have a chance to control these fires or at least protect exposures.

274 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Fire suppression, con’t 2.1 The building is surrounded and adjoined by public ways or yards not less than 60 feet ( mm) in width. 2.2 The building is provided with an automatic sprinkler system throughout with a design density of 0.25 gal/min (0.16 L/s). 2.3 The total fuel capacity of all aircraft

275 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Fire suppression, con’t located within a single fire area does not exceed 5,000 gallons ( L). 2.4 No single fire area exceeds 65,000 square feet (3716 m2). 2.5 The gross building area does not exceed 75,000 square feet (4288 m2).

276 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Separation of maximum single fire areas. Maximum single fire areas established in accordance with hangar classification and construction type in Table shall be separated by 2-hour fire walls constructed in accordance with Section 706 of the International Building Code. In determining the maximum single fire area as set forth in Table ancillary uses which are separated from aircraft servicing areas by a minimum of a 1-hour fire barrier constructed in Corresponding section in the building code is Spaces ancillary to the aircraft servicing and storage areas of an aircraft hanger need no longer be included in the fire area size when determining fire suppression requirements provided they are seperated by a minimum 1-hour fire barrier.

277 Chapter 9 Fire Protection Systems
Separation of maximum single fire areas, con’t accordance with Section 707 of the International Building Code shall not be included in the area.

278 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Section 1004 Occupant Load Cummulative occupant loads. Where the path of egress travel includes intervening rooms, areas or spaces, cummulative occupant loads shall be determined in accordance with this section Intervening spaces. Where occupants Sections through are new to help when determining capacity and the number of means of egress.

279 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Intervening spaces, con’t egress from one room, area or space through another, the design occupant load shall be based on the cummlative occupant loads of all rooms, areas or spaces to that point along the path of egress travel Adjacent levels. The occupant load of a mezzanine or story with egress through a room,

280 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Adjacent levels, con’t area or space on an adjacent level shall be added to the occupant load of that room, area or space Areas without fixed seating. The number of occupants shall be computed at the rate of one occupant per unit of area as prescribed in Table For areas without fixed seating, the occupant load shall not be less than that number An occupant load factor for museums and exhibit galleries has been added, established at 30 square feet per occupant. The assembly factors that were previously used did not generally provide an occupant load that was reflective of the actual use of the space. The manner in which these spaces function is different than the way most assembly uses are used and the new factor recognizes this difference. (See the Significant Changes book for more detail)

281 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Areas without fixed seating, con’t determined by dividing the floor area under consideration by the occupant per unit of area load factor assigned to the occupancy as set forth function of the space as set in Table Where an intended use function is not listed in Table , the building fire code official shall establish a use function based on a listed use function that most nearly resembles the intended use function.

282 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Areas without fixed seating, con’t Exception: Where approved by the fire code official, the actual number of occupants for whom each occupied space, floor or building is designed, although less than those determined by calculation, shall be permitted to be used in the determination of the design occupant load.

283 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Table Maximum Floor Area Allowances Per Occupant FUNCTION OF SPACE FLOOR AREA IN SQ. FT. PER OCCUPANT LAOD FACTOR a Accessory storage areas, mechanical equipment room 300 gross Agricultural building Aircraft hangars 500 gross Airport terminal Baggage claim Baggage handling Concourse Waiting areas 20 gross 100 gross 15 gross

284 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Table , con’t Remainder of Table has no changes. Assembly Gaming floors (keno, slots, etc.) Exhibit gallery and museum 11 gross 30 net This is the area in the Table where exhibit gallery and museum was added.

285 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Section 1005 Means of Egress Width Sizing Minimum required egress width. General. The means of egress width shall not be less than required by this section. The total width of means of egress in inches (mm) shall not be less than the total occupant load served by the means of egress multiplied by 0.3 inches (7.62 mm) per occupant for stairways and by 0.2 inches (5.08 mm) per occupant With the exception of one issue, this is primarily an editorial code change that is intended to reorganize and clarify the multiple requirement related to egress width that were previously contained in a single paragraph, as well as relocating the related provisions from Section and to a more logical location with other egress width/capacity provisions. The significant technical change can be found in the exceptions to Section and The exceptions reinstate the reduced egress width factors for sprinklered buildings that has been in the 2000 through 2006 IBC but were remove in the 2009 edition.

286 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
General, con’t for other egress components. The width shall not be less than specified elsewhere in this code. Multiple means of egress shall be sized such that the loss of any one means of egress shall not reduce the available capacity to less than 50 percent of the required capacity. The maximum capacity required from any story of a building shall be maintained to the termination of the means of egress. All portions of

287 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
General, con’t the means of egress system shall be sized in accordance with this section. Exception: Means of egress complying with Section Door encroachment Minimum width based on component. Doors, when fully opened, and handrails shall not reduce the required means of replaces the second sentence of the previous code’s Section and notes that minimum width requirements for means of egress components may be specified in other locations in the code

288 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Minimum width based on component, con’t egress width by more than 7 inches (178 mm). Doors in any position shall not reduce the required width by more than one half. Other nonstructural projections such as trim and similar decorative features shall be permitted to project into the required width a maximum 1 ½ inches (38 mm) on each side. Exception: The restrictions on a door swing shall not apply to doors within individual dwelling units

289 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Minimum width based on component, con’t and sleeping units of Group R-2 and dwelling units of Group R-3. The minimum width, in inches (mm), of any means of egress component shall not be less than that specified for such component elsewhere in this code or the International Building Code.

290 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Door hardware encroachment required capacity based on occupant load. Surface mounted latch release hardware shall be exempt from inclusion in the 7 inch (178 mm) maximum projection requirement of Section when: The hardware is mounted to the side of the door facing the corridor width when the door is in the open position; and The hardware is mounted not less than 34 provides the egress width factors in subsections that deal with the various types of components. Note the new exceptions in Section and for sprinklered buildings that allow for a reduction in the minimum required calculated width.

291 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
required capacity based on occupant load, con’t inches (865 mm) or more than 48 inches (1220 mm) above the finished floor. The required capacity, in inches (mm), of the means of egress for any room, area, space or story shall not be less than that determined in accordance with Sections and Stairways. The capacity, in inches (mm), The provisions of the former Section have been incorporated as the last sentence of Section

292 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Stairways, con’t of means of egress stairways shall be calcualted by multiplying the occupant load served by such stairways by a means of egress capacity factor of 0.3 inch (7.6 mm) per occupant. Where stairways serve more than one story, only the occupant load of each story considered individually shall be used in calculating the required caoacity of the stairways serving that story.

293 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Stairways, con’t Exception: For other than Group H and I-2 occupancies, the capacity, in inches (mm), of means of egress stairways shall be calculated multiplying the occupant load served by such stairway by a means of egress capacity factor of 0.2 inch (5.1 mm) per occupant in buildings equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section or and an emergency

294 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Stairways, con’t voice/alarm communication system in accordance with Section Other egress components. The capacity, in inches (mm), of means of egress components other than stairways shall be calculated by multiplying the occupant load served by such components by a means of egress capacity factor of 0.2 inch (5.1 mm) per occupant.

295 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Other egress components, con’t Exception: For other than Group H and I-2 occupancies, the capacity, in inches (mm), of means of egress components other than stairways shall be calculated multiplying the occupant load served by such component by a means of egress capacity factor of 0.15 inch (3.8 mm) per occupant in buildings equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler systeminstalled in accordance with Section

296 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Other egress components, con’t or and an emergency voice/alarm communication system in accordance with Section Continuity. The capacity of the means of egress required from any story of a building shall not be reduced along the path of egress travel until arrival at the public way. Section states that once a minimum capacity is required along a means of egress, it must be provided along the entire path of egress travel. This is the same as the last sentence of the previous code’s Section

297 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Distribution of egress capacity. Where more than one exit, or access to more than one exit, is required, the means of egress shall be configured such that the loss of any one exit, or access to one exit, shall not reduce the available capacity to less than 50 percent of the required capacity Egress convergence. Where the means of egress from stories above and below converge is consistent with the fourth sentence of the previous code’s Section No changes. is what was previously in Section

298 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Egress convergence, con’t at an intermediate level, the capacity of the means of egress from the point of convergence shall not be less than the sum of the required capacities for the two adjacent stories Encroachment. Encroachment into the required means of egress width shall be in accordance with the provisions of this section. is the egress provisions from the previous code’s Section is a new charging section for encroachment in the required means of egress.

299 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Doors. Doors, when fully opened, shall not reduce the required width by more than 7 inches (178 mm). Doors in any position shall not reduce the required width by more than one-half. Exceptions: 1. Surface-mounted latch release hardware shall be exempt from inclusion in the 7 inch maximum (178 mm) encraochment where: is the previous code’s Section and

300 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Doors, con’t 1.1 The hardware is mounted to the side of the door facing away from the adjacent wall where the door is in the open position; and 1.2 The hardware is mounted not less than 34 inches (865 mm) nor more than 48 inches (1219 mm) above the finished floor.

301 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Doors, con’t 2. The restrictions on door swing shall not apply to doors within individual dwelling units and sleeping units of Group R-2 occupancies and dwelling units of Group R-3 occupancies Other projections. Handrail projections shall be in accordance with the provisions of Section Other nonstructural projections is the previous code’s Section and a roadmap to an existing Section

302 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Other projections, con’t such as trim and similar decorative features shall be permitted to project into the required width a maximum of 1 ½ inches (38 mm) on each side Protruding objects. Protruding objects shall comply with the applicable requirements of Section this section is a reminder that protruding objects are applicable when looking at encroachments into a confined path of travel. The difference, however, is that door and other projections are applied to the required minimum width, while protruding object provisions apply to paths of travel even when wider than required.

303 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Section 1007 Accessible Means of Egress Exterior area for assisted rescue. The exterior area for assisted rescue must be open to the outside air and meet the requirements of Section separation walls shall comply with the requirements of Section 705 of the International Building Code for exterior walls. Where walls or openings are between the area for assisted rescue The provisions addressing exterior areas for assisted rescue have been clarified to focus on where such accessible means of egress components are intended to be utilized.

304 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
exterior area for assisted rescue, con’t and the interior of the building, the building exterior walls within 10 feet (3048 mm) horizontally of a nonrated wall or unprotected opening shall have a fire resistive rating of not less than 1 hour. Openings within such exterior walls shall be protected by opening protectives having a fire protection rating of not less than ¾ hour. This construction shall extend vertically from the ground to a point 10 feet (3048 mm) above the floor level of the area for assisted

305 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
exterior area for assisted rescue, con’t rescue or to the roof line, whichever is lower. Exterior areas for assisted rescue shall be accessed by an accessible route from the area served. Exterior areas for assisted rescue shall be permitted in accordance with Section or Level of exit discharge. Where the exit discharge does not include an accessible route from an exit located on a level of exit discharge to the revisions in Section for the exterior area for assisted rescue have split the provisions into smaller sections addressing limited aspects of the requirements.

306 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Level of exit discharge, con’t a public way, an exterior area of assisted rescue shall be provided on the exterior landing in accordance with Sections through Outdoor facilities. Where exit access from the area serving outdoor facilities is essentially open to the outside, an exterior area of assisted rescue is permitted as an alternative to Section has been added to clearly state that exterior areas for rescue assistance can be located at other than the level of exit discharge. Users should also note that when the exterior area of assisted rescue is located at other than the level of exit discharge, a two-way communications system is required.

307 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Outdoor facilities, con’t an area of refuge. Every required exterior area of assisted rescue shall have direct access to an interior stairway, exterior stairway, or elevator serving as an accessible means of egress component. The exterior area of assisted rescue shall comply with Sections through and shall be provided with a two-way communication system complying with Sections and

308 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Size. Each exterior area for assisted rescue shall be sized to accommodate wheelchair spaces in accordance with Section Separation. Exterior walls separating the exterior area of assisted rescue from the interior of the building shall have a minimum fire-resistance-rating of 1 hour, rated for exposure to fire from the inside. The fire resistance-rated exterior wall construction shall extend Section is a road map back to Section when sizing exterior areas of rescue assistance for wheelchairs. is the previous code language from Section and reworded to ccccccclarify.

309 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Separation, con’t horizontally 10 feet (3048 mm) beyond the landing on either side of the landing or equivalent fire-resistance-rated construction is permitted to ectend out perpendicular to the exterior wall 4 feet (1219 mm) minimum on the side of the landing. The fire-resistance-rated construction shall extend vertically from the ground to a point 10 feet (3048 mm) above the floor level of the area for assisted rescue or to the roof line, whichever

310 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Separation, con’t is lower. Openings within each fire-resistance-rated exterior wall shall be protected in accordance with Section 716 of the International Building Code.

311 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Section 1008 Doors, Gates and Turnstiles Door swing. Egress doors shall be of the pivoted or side-hinged swinging type. Exceptions: 1. Private garages, office areas, factory and storage areas with an occupant load of 10 or less. is a clarification change. The occupant load used to determine the door swing requirement is not to be based on an assigned or distributed occupant load, but on the entire occupant load of the space served by the door. The revision clarifies that the total occupant load of the space is used to determine if the occupant load is over 50 people and therefore the doors must swing in the direction of travel. See example in the Significant Change book.

312 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Door swing, con’t 2. Group I-3 occupancies used as a place of detention. 3. Critical or intensive care patient rooms within suites of health care facilities. 4. Doors within or serving a single dwelling unit in Group R-2 and R In other than Group H occupancies, revolving doors complying with Section

313 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Door swing, con’t 6. In other than Group H occupancies, horizontal sliding doors complying with Section are permitted in a means of egress. 7. Power-operated doors in accordance with Section Doors serving a bathroom within an individual sleeping unit in Group r In other than Group H occupancies, manually

314 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Door swing, con’t operated horizontal sliding doors are permitted in a means of egress from spaces with an occupant load of 10 or less. Doors shall swing in the direction of egress travel where serving a room or area containing an occupant load of 50 or more persons or a Group H occupancy.

315 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, Group I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care. In facilities subject to licensure by the State, A approved delayed special egress locks shall be permitted in a Group I-1, Group I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care occupancy where the clinical needs or persons receiving care requires such locking. Delayed Special egress locks shall be permitted in such occupancies where the building is equipped throughout with a automatic sprinkler The changes in purple are changes Oregon made to deal with the new designations for the old SR occupancies. The word delay was changed to special at the model level because these requirements are to address special safety needs for wards that may include dementia or Alzheimer patients/to make sure the door does not release unless an emergency occurs. This is a carry over from the old SR Appendix.

316 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t system in accordance with Section in Group I-1 and I-2, in Group R-4 and in Group R-3 facilities providing care, or an approved automatic smoke or heat detection system installed in accordance with Section 907, provided that the doors unlock are installed and

317 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t operate in accordance with Items 1 through 6 7 below. A building occupant shall not be required to pass through more than one door equipped with a delayed egress lock before entering an exit.

318 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t The doors unlock upon actuation of the automatic sprinkler system or automatic fire detection system. The doors unlock upon loss of power controlling the lock or lock mechanism.

319 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t 3. The door locks shall have the capability of being unlocked by a signal from the fire command center, a nursing station or other Approved location. 4. A building occupant shall not be required to

320 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t pass through more than one two doors equipped with a special egress lock before entering an exit The procedures for the operation(s) of the unlocking system shall be described and Oregon previously allowed two doors to be passed through and the industry that operated these types of facilities requested this continue for the time being based on cost and all the other changes happenning to SR occupancies by the deletion of the SR Appendix.

321 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t approved as part of the emergency planning and preparedness required by chapter All clinical staff shall have the keys, codes or other means necessary to operate the locking devices.

322 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t Emergency lighting shall be provided at the door. Exceptions: 1. Items 1 through 3 4 shall not apply to doors to

323 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t areas where persons, which because of clinical needs, require restraint or containment as part of the function of a mental hospital psychiatric treatment area. 2. In Groups I-1 Condition 2, Group R-4

324 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t Condition 2 and Group R-3 facilities providing care, where the refuge area is located in a fenced or walled yard, special egress locks located on doors or gates in the fence or wall need not automatically deactivate when the refuge area is exterior to and not less than 50 feet ( mm)

325 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Special locking arrangements in doors in Group I-1, I-2, R-3 and R-4 facilities providing care, con’t away from the building and access to the public way is provided. Except where provided in a public way, each refuge area shall have a minimum of 15 square feet (1.4 m2) of net clear area for each occupant.

326 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Stairway doors. Interior stairway means of egress doors shall be openable from both sides without the use of a key or special knowledge or effort. Exceptions: 1. Stairway discharge doors shall be openable from the egress side and shall only be locked from the opposite side.

327 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Stairway doors, con’t 2. This section shall not apply to doors arranged in accordance with Section of the International Building Code. 3. In stairways serving not more than four stories, doors are permitted to be locked from the side opposite the egress side, provided they are openable from the egress side and capable of

328 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Stairway doors, con’t being unlocked simultaneously without unlatching upon a signal from the fire command center, if present, or a signal by emergency personnel from a single location inside the main entrance to the building. 4. Stairway exit doors shall be openable from the egress side and shall only be locked

329 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Stairway doors, con’t from the opposite side in Group B, F, M and S occupancies where the only interior access to the tenant space is from a single exit stair where permitted in Section Stairway exit doors shall be openable from the rgress side and shall only be locked from the opposite side in Group R-2 Exception 4 and 5 allow for stairways in single-exit buildings to have doorways that lead to multiple tenants and dwelling units. For security reasons, those doors can remain locked from the stairway side so no one can enter another tenant space or dwelling unit from the exit stairway.

330 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Stairway doors, con’t occupancies where the only interior access to the dwelling unit is from a single exit stair where permitted in Section Controlled egress locks. Controlled egress locks shall be permitted to be installed on doors serving Group I-1, I-2, R-3 occupancies subject to licensure by the stae, Group R-4 and This was the old requirements for SR that has been covered under Section Special locking arrangements as previous discussed.

331 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Controlled egress locks, con’t SR occupancies provided that the fire sprinkler system, the fire alarm system and the controlled egress are in compliance with Section SR 107 and SR

332 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Section 1009 Stairways General. Stairways serving occupied portions of a building shall comply with the requirements of this section Interior exit stairways. Interior exit stairways shall lead directly to the exterior of the building or shall be extended to the interior of the Section has been clarified to apply to any stairway serving occupied portions of a building, including “convenience” stairways that are not a portion of a required means of egress or required means of egress stairways. The remaining sections in and 1010 are for clarification. Revisions have been made throughout the code to coordinate the requirements for when unenclosed stairways can be used as a part of the means of egress and how they are regulated. The revision is considered as a comprehensive change that addresses the entire egress system and how unenclosed stairs affect issues such as exit versus exit access, travel distance measurements, contribution to the minimum number of required exits, etc. Code users should be aware of these changes because they will affect the terminology that the code previously used and result in a number of changes being made throughout the code.

333 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Interior exit stairways, con’t building with an exit passageway conforming to the requirements of Section 1023, except as permitted in Section Where required. Interior exit stairways shall be included, as necessary, to meet one or more means of egress design requirements, such as required number of exits or exit access travel distance.

334 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Interior exit stairways, con’t Enclosure. All interior exit stairways shall be enclosed in accordance with the provisions of Section Exit access stairways. Floor openings between stories created by exit access stairways shall be enclosed.

335 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t Exceptions: 1. In other than Group I-2 and I-3 occupancies, exit access stairways that serve, or atmospherically communicate between, only two stories, are not required to be enclosed. 2. Exit access stairways serving and contained

336 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t within a single residential dwelling unit or sleeping unit in Group R-1, R-2 or R-3 occupancies are not required to be enclosed. 3. In buildings with only Group B or M occupancies, exit accress stairway openings are not required to be enclosed provided

337 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t that the building is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section , the area of the floor opening between stories does not exceed twice the horizontal projected area of the exit accress stairway, and the opening is protected by a draft curtain and closely soaces sprinklers in accordance with NFPA 13.

338 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t 4. In other than Group B and M occupancies, exit access stairway openings are not requird to be enclosed provided that the building is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section , the floor opening does not connect more than four stories, the area of the floor opening between stories

339 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t does not exceed twice the horizontal projected area of the exit access stairway, and the opening is protected by a draft curtain ans closely spaced sprinklers in accordance with NFPA Exit access stairways within an atrium complying with the provisions of Section 404

340 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t of the International Building Code are not required to be enclosed. 6. Exit access stairways and ramps in open parking garages that serve only the parking garage are not required to be enclosed. 7. Stairways serving outdoor facilities where all

341 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t portions of the means of egress are essentially open to the outside are not required to be enclosed. 8. Exit access stairways serving stages, platforms and technical production areas in accordance with Section and of the International Building Code are not required to be enclosed.

342 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t 9. Stairways are permitted to be open between the balcony, gallery or press box and the main assembly floor in occupancies such as theaters, places of religious worship, auditoriums and sports facilities. 10. In Group I-3 occupancies, exit access stairways constructed in accordance with

343 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit access stairways, con’t Section of the International Building Code are not required to be enclosed Construction. Where required, enclosures for exit access stairways shall be constructed in accordance with this section. Exit access stairway enclosures shall be constructed as fire barriers in accordance with Section 707 of

344 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Construction, con’t the International Building Code or horizontal assemblies in accordance with Section 711 of the International Building Code, or both Materials. Exit access stairway enclosures shall be of materials permitted by the building type of construction.

345 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Fire-resistance rating. Exit access stairway enclosures shall have a fire-resistance rating of not less than 2 hours where connecting four stories or more, and not less than 1 hour where connecting less than four stories. The number of stories connected by the exit access stairway enclosures shall include and basement, but not any mezzanines. Exit access stairway enclosures shall have a fire-resistance rating not less than the floor assembly penetrated, but need not excced 2 hours.

346 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Continuity. Exit access stairway enclosures shall have continuity in accordance with Section of the International Building Code for fire barriers or Section of the International Building Code for horizontal assemblies as applicable Openings. Openings in an exit access stairway enclosure shall be protected in accordance with Section 716 of the International

347 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Openings, con’t Building Code as required for fire barriers. Doors shall be self- or automatic-closing by smoke detection in accordance with Section of the International Building Code Prohibited openings. Openings other than those necessary for the purpose of the exit access stairway enclosure shall not be permitted in exit access stairway enclosures.

348 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Penetrations. Penetrations in an exit access stairway enclosure shall be protected in accordance with Section 714 of the International Building Code as required for fire barriers Prohibited penetrations. Penetrations other than those necessary for the purpose of the exit access stairway enclosures shall not be permitted in exit access stairway enclosures.

349 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Joints. Joints in an exit access stairway shall comply with Section 715 of the International Building Code Ducts and air transfer openings. Penetrations of an exit access stairway enclosure by ducts and air transfer openings shall comply with Section 717 of the International Building Code.

350 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exterior walls. Where exterior walls serve as part of an exit access stairway enclosure, such walls shall comply with the requirements of Section 705 of the International Building Code for exterior walls and the fire-resistance-rated enclosure requirements shall not apply Handrails. Stairways shall have handrails on each side and shall comply with Section 1012. Section (4) & (5) are new Oregon amendments proposed by BCD so the OSSC and the ORSC correlate as some R-3 can be built to the ORSC.

351 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Handrails, con’t Where glass is used to provide the handrail. The handrail shall also comply with Section 2407 of the International Building Code. Exceptions: 1. Handrails for aisle stairs are not required where permitted by provided in accordance with Section

352 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Handrails, con’t 2. Stairways within dwelling units, and spiral stairways and aisle stairs serving seating only on one side are permitted to have a handrail on one side only. 3. Decks, patios and walkways that have a single change in elevation where the landing depth on each side of the change of elevation is greater than what is required for a landing do not require handrails.

353 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Handrails, con’t 4. In Group R-3 occupancies, decks patios and walkways that have a change in elevation consisting of a continuous run of treads or flight of stairs with three or fewer risers where the landing depth on each side of the change of elevation is greater than what is required for a landing do not require handrails.

354 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Handrails, con’t In Group R-3 occupancies, a change in elevation consisting of a single continuous run of treads or flight of stairs with three or fewer risers at an entrance or egress door does not require handrails Changes in room elevations of three or fewer risers within dwelling units and sleeping units in

355 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Handrails, con’t Groups R-2 and R-3 do not require handrails. Section 1010 Ramps Enclosure. All interior exit ramps shall be enclosed in accordance with the applicable provisions of Section Exit access ramps Section is a road map to find the appropriate requirements for exit ramps.

356 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Enclosure, con’t shall be enclosed in accordance with the provisions of Section for enclosures of stairways. Section 1011 Exit Signs Floor-level exit signs in Group R-1. Where This is a new section requiring floor level exit signs in Group R-1 occupancies. This requirement was limited to egress systems serving the guest rooms of R-1 occupancies because the occupants a transient and not familiar with their surroundings. One additional argument that was made to support the change at the code hearings was that these low-level exit signs will also serve to increase firefighter safety. It should also be noted that by reference to Section , this provision will require internally illuminated signs.

357 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Floor-level exit signs in Group R-1, con’t exit signs are required in Group R-1 occupancies by Section , additional low-level exit signs shall be provided in all areas serving guestrooms in Group R-1 occupancies and shall comply with Section The bottom of the sign shall be not less than 10 inches (254 mm) nor more than 12 inches

358 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Floor-level exit signs in Group R-1, con’t (305 mm) above floor level. The sign shall be flush mounted to the door or wall. Where mounted on the wall, the edge of the sign shall be within 4 inches (102 mm) of the door frame on the latch side.

359 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Section 1021 Number of Exits and Continuity Exit configuration Exit from stories. All spaces within each story shall have access to the minimum number of approved independent exits as specified in Table based on the occupant load of the story. For the purposes of this chapter, occupied roofs shall be provided with exits as required for stories. This code change was a modification. A new section clarifies when a single exit is permitted within or from an individual dwelling unit. A separate revision allows exits to be arranged where they serve a portion of a story instead of requiring that all of the required exits from the story be accessible to all of the occupants.

360 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t Exceptions: 1. As modified by Section of the International Building Code. 2. As modified by Section Exit access stairways and ramps that comply with Exception 2 or 4 of Section shall be permitted to provide for minimum number of approved independent exits required by Table on each story.

361 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t 4. In Group R-2 and R-3 occupancies, one means of egress is permitted within and from individual dwelling units with a maximum occupant load of 20 where the dwelling unit is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section or Within a story, rooms and spaces complying with Section with exits that discharge

362 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t directly to the exterior at the level of exit discharge, are permitted to have one exit. Two exits, or rxit access stairways or rampsproviding access to exits, from any story or occupaied roof shall be provided where one of the following conditions exits: 1. The occupant load or number of dwelling

363 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t units exceeds one of the values in Table (1) or (2). 2. The exit access travel distance exceeds that specified in Table (1) or (2) as determined in accordance with the provisions of section Helistop landing areas located on buildings or structures shall be provided with two exits, or exit access stairways or ramps providing

364 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t access to exits. Exceptions: 1. Rooms, areas and spaces complying with Section with exits that discharge directly to the exterior at the level of exit discharge are permitted to have one exit.

365 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t 2. Group R-3 occupancy buildings shall be permitted to have one exit. 3. Parking garages where vehicles are mechanically parked shall be permitted to have one exit. 4. Air traffic control towers shall be provided with the minimum number of exits specified in Section of the International Building Code.

366 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t 5. Individual dwelling units in compliance with Section Group R-3 and R-4 congregate residences shall be permitted to have one exit. 7. Exits serving specific spaces or areas need not be accessed by the remanider of the story when all of the following are met:

367 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t 7.1 The number of exits from the entire story complies with Section ; 7.2 The access to exitsfrom each individual space in the story complies with Section ; and 7.3 All spaces within each portion of a story shall have access to the minimum number of approved independent exits

368 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit from stories, con’t based on the occupant load of that portion of the story, but not less than two exits. NOTE: Table (1) and (2) are also new. Old Tables and , Sections through were deleted by model code.

369 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Mixed occupancies. Where one exit, or exit access stairway or ramp providing access to exits at other stories, is permitted to serve individual stories, mixed occupancies shall be permitted to be served by single exits provided each individual occupancy complies with the applicable requirements of Table (1) or Table (2) for that occupancy. Where applicable, cummulative occupant loads from adjacent occupancies shall be considered in In the evaluation of a mixed occupancy building that is served by a single exit, it has been clarified as to how the occupant load is to be evaluated. Previously, a single exit was permitted provided each individual occupancy was in compliance. The new provisions address mixed occupancy buildings in a ratio manner similar to that used for allowable floor area limitations in separated occupancy buildings.

370 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Mixed occupancies, con’t accordance with the provisions of Section In each story of a mixed occupancy building, the maximum number of occupants served by a single exit shall be such that the sum of the ratios of the calculated number of occupants of the space divided by the allowable number of occupants for each occupancy does not exceed one.

371 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Basements. A basement provided with one exit shall not be located more than one story below grade plane Single-story or multiple-story dwelling units. Individual single-story or multiple-story dwelling units shall be permitted to have a single exit within and from the dwelling unit provided that all of the following criteria are met: limits basements with a single exit to a single level below grade. essentially replaces to previous code exception # 4 in Section This new section will clarify the single means of egress requirements for a dwelling unit and state all of the requirements in a single location.

372 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Single-story or multiple-story dwelling units, con’t 1. The dwelling unit complies with Section as a space with one means of egress; and 2. Either the exit from the dwelling unit discharges directly to the exterior at the level of exit discharge, or the exit access outside the dwelling unit’s entrance door provides

373 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Single-story or multiple-story dwelling units, con’t access to not less than two approved independent exits Three or more exits. Three exits, or exit access stairways or ramps providing access to exits at other stories, shall be provided from any story or occupied roof with an occupant load clarifies when three or more exits are required. This was in a table in the previous code.

374 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Three or more exits, con’t from 501 to and including 1,000. Four exits or exit access stairways or ramps providing access to exits at other stories, shall be provided from any story or occupied roof with an occupant load greater than 1, Additional exits. In buildings over 420 feet (128 m) in height, additional exits shall be is a road map to Section of the IBC for additional exits if the building is a super high rise.

375 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Additional exits, con’t Provided in accordance with Section of the International Building Code Exit configuration. Exits, or exit access stairways or ramps providing access to exits at other stories, shall be arranged in accordance with the provisions of Sections through Exits shall be continuous from the point is another road map and also emphasizes that exits must be continuous from the point of entry to the exit discharge.

376 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Exit configuration, con’t of entry into the exit to the exit discharge Access to exits at adjacent levels. Access to exits at other levels shall be by stairways or ramps. Where access to exits occurs from adjacent building levels, the horizontal and vertical exit access travel distance to the closest exit shall not exceed that specified in Section is a new section for access to exits at adjacent levels and the exception is for the previous code Section for helistops.

377 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Access to exits at adjacent levels, con’t Access to exits at other levels shall be from an adjacent story. Exception: Landing platforms or roof areas for helistops that are less than 60 feet ( mm) long, or less than 2,000 square feet (186 m2) in area, shall be permitted to access the second exit by a fire escape, alternating tread device or

378 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Access to exits at adjacent levels, con’t ladder leading to the story or level below Vehicular ramps. Vehicular ramps shall not be considered as an exit ramp unless pedestrian facilities are provided. allows vehicle-only ramps to be considered as one of the required exit access ramps if pedestrian walkways are provided along the ramp.

379 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Section 1022 Exit Enclosures Interior Exit Stairways and Ramps Penetrations. Penetrations into and openings through an interior exit enclosure stairways and ramps are prohibited except for required exit doors, equipment and ductwork necessary for independent ventilation or pressurization, sprinkler piping, standpipes, electrical Penetrations of the outside membrane of the fire barrier enclosing an exit stair ot ramp are permitted when the penetration is properly protected. The code previously prohibited any type of penetration into the fire-resistance-rated enclosure around an exit stairway or ramp. The new exception will for the first time allow penetrations in the exterior membrane of the assembly and will reference the penetration fire-stopping requirements of IBC Section

380 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Penetrations, con’t raceway for fire department communication systems and electrical raceways serving the interior exit enclosure stairway and ramp and terminating at a steel box not exceeding 16 square inches (0.010 m). Such penetrations shall be protected in accordance with Section 714 of the International Building Code. There shall be no penetrations or communication openings, whether protected or not, between adjacent

381 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Penetrations, con’t interior exit enclosure stairways and ramps. Exception: Membrane penetrations shall be permitted on the outside of the interior exit stairway and ramp. Such penetrations shall be protected in accordance with Section of the International Building Code.

382 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Section 1030 Maintenance of the Means of Egress Reliability. Required exit access, exits or exit discharges shall be continuously maintained free from obstructions or impediments to full instant use in case of fire or other emergency when the building areas served by such exits are the means of egress is occupied. Security devices affecting means of egress shall be subject to approval of the fire code official. was revised to clarify that an exit or exit passageway cannot be used for any purpose that can interfere with a means of egress. An example would include storage of materials or combustible debris in a corridor or exit passageway, thus reducing the available exit width.

383 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Reliability, con’t An exit or exit passageway shall not be used for any purpose that interfers with a means of egress Security devices and egress locks. Security devices affecting means of egress shall be subject to approval of the fire code official. Special locking arrangements including, but not limited to access-controlled egress doors, requires that the systems be maintained in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 10. These systems should be maintained in accordance with the building code requirements in effect at the time of construction.

384 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Security devices and egress locks, con’t security grills, locks and latches, and delayed egress locks shall be installed and maintained as required by this chapter Finishes, furnishings and decorations. Means of egress doors shall be maintained in such a manner as to be distinguishable from the adjacent construction and finishes such that the The provisions for means-of-egress doors in Section were revised to clarify that doors must be clearly distinguishable from adjacent construction and building finishes.

385 Chapter 10 Means of Egress
Finishes, furnishings and decorations, con’t doors are easily recognizable as doors, Furnishings, decorations or other objects shall not be placed so as to obstruct exits, access thereto, egress there from, or visibility thereof. Hangings and draperies shall not be placed over exit doors or otherwise be located to conceal or obstruct an exit. Mirrors shall not be placed on exit doors. Mirrors shall not be placed in or adjacent to any exit in such a manner to confuse the direction of exit.

386 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Section General Intent. The intent of this chapter is to provide a minimum degree of fire and life safety in conjunction with OAR to persons occupying existing buildings by providing for alterations to such buildings that do not comply with the minimum construction requirements where such existing buildings do not comply with the Requirements for applying the retroactive requirements in existing buildings were clarified. Because the term “alteration” has significant ramifications to existing buildings, the term was deleted from the general requirements in Section The deletion helps align the IFC Chapter 11 provisions with those in the IBC Chapter 34 and the IEBC.

387 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Intent, con’t minimum requirements of the International Building Code Permits. Permits shall be required as set forth in Section and and the International Building Code and this code. added a reference to IFC Section 105.6, Required Operational Permits.

388 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Section Fire Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings Table Occupancy and Use Requirements a. This table has a new footnote a as follows: a. Existing buildings shall comply with the sections identified as “required” ® based on occupancy classification or use, or both, whichever is applicable.

389 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Section Fire Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings Where required. Existing Group I-1 and R occupancies and dwellings not classified as Group R occupancies not already provided with single-station smoke alarms shall be provided with single-station smoke alarms. Installation shall be in accordance with Section , except as provided in Sections and This section added existing Group I-1 along with Group R occupancies be provided with single-station smoke alarms if they are not already provided with them. Reference is made to the new building requirements of Section for the primary requirements, except where Section and are more specific. Therefore, the basic requirement is that smoke alams need to be provided in all locations required by Section , but several modified requirements related to interconnection of alarms and power supply are provided, recognizing the impracticality of such installations in existing conditions.

390 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Where required, con’t Exceptions: Where the code that ws in effect at the time of construction required smoke alarms and smoke alarms complying with those requirements already provided. Where smoke alarms have been installed in occupancies and dwellings that were not three exceptions are also provided to address possible scenarios where smoke alarms have already been installed but the installation does not meet the current code requirements, recognizing that the intent of the code is to permit existing smoke alarm installations to continue unchanged where they meet the code that was in effect at the time they were installed.

391 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Where required, con’t required to have them at the time of construction , additional smoke alarms shall not be required provided that the existing smoke alarms comply with requirements that were in effect at the time of installation. 3. Where smoke detectors connected to a fire alarm system have been installed as a substitute for smoke alarms.

392 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Interconnection. Where more than one smoke alarm is required to be installed within individual dwelling or sleeping unit, the smoke alarms shall be interconnected in such a manner that the activation of one alarm will activate all of the alarms in the individual unit. Physical interconnection of smoke alarms shall not be required where listed wireless alarms are installed and all alarms sound upon activation of one alarm. The alarm shall be clearly audible in all This section added language that allows listed wireless alarms to substitute for wired interconnection of the smoke alarms.

393 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Interconnection, con’t bedrooms over background noise levels with all intervening doors closed. Exception: No changes to the 2 exceptions.

394 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Carbon monoxide alarms. Approved carbon monoxide alarms in existing buildings and structures shall be provided in the locations described in Sections and Carbon monoxide alarms Group I. Existing Group I or R occupancies located in a building containing a fuel-burning appliance or a building which has an attached garage shall be equipped with single-station carbon monoxide Section is a new section requiring carbon monoxide alarms in existing Group I or R occupancies. Oregon amended this section to align with ORS and OAR 837, Chapter 41.

395 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Group I, con’t alarms. The carbon monoxide alarms shall be listed as complying with UL 2034, and be installed and maintained in accordance with NFPA 720 and the manufacturer’s instaructions. An open parking garage, as defined in the International Building Code, or an enclosed parking garage ventilated in accordance with Section 404 of the International Mechanical Code shall not be deemed to be an attached garage.

396 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Group I, con’t Exception: Sleeping units or dwelling units which do not themselvescontain a fuel-burning appliance or have an attached garage, but which are located in a building with a fuel-burning appliance or an attached garage, need not be equipped with single-station carbon monoxide alarms provided that: 1. The sleeping unit or dwelling unit is located

397 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Group I, con’t more than one story above or below ant story that contains a fuel-burning appliance or an attached garage; 2. The sleeping unit or dwelling unit is not connected by duct work or ventilation shafts to any room containing a fuel-burning appliance or to an attached garage; and

398 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Group I, con’t 3. The building is provided with a common area carbon monoxide alarm system Carbon monoxide detection systems. Carbon monoxide detection systems which include carbon monoxide detectors and audible notification appliances, installed and maintained in accordance with this section for carbon

399 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Carbon monoxide detection systems, con’t monoxide alarms and NFPA 720 shall be permitted. The carbon monoxide detectors shall be listed as complying with UL Group R. Carbon monoxide alarms or a household carbon monoxide detection system shall be installed in Group R occupancies in accordance with this code and Oregon

400 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Group R, con’t Administrative Rule 837, Division Installation location. Carbon monoxide alarms shall be located in each bedroom or within 15 feet (4572 mm) outside each bedroom door. Bedrooms on separate floor levels in a structure consisting of two or more stories shall have separate carbon monoxide alarms serving each story.

401 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Three or more dwelling units. In addition to the location required by Section , a carbon monoxide alarms shall be installed in any enclosed common area within buildings containing three or more dwelling units Alarm requirements Single station alarm requirements. Single station carbon monoxide alarms shall be

402 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Single station alarm requirements, con’t listed as complying with ANSI/UL 2034 and shall be installed in accordance with this code and the manufacturer’s installation instructions Household carbon monoxide detection systems. Household carbon monoxide detection systems, that include carbon monoxide detectors and audible notification appliances,

403 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Household carbon monoxide detection systems, con’t installed and maintained in accordance with this section for carbon monoxide alarms and NFPA 720 shall be permitted. The carbon monoxide detectors shall be listed as commplying with ANSI/UL2075.

404 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Combination smoke/carbon monoxide alarms/detectors requirements. Combination smoke/carbon monoxide alarms shall be listed as complying with ANSI/UL 2034 and ANSI/UL 217. Combination smoke/carbon monoxide detectors shall be listed as complying with ANSI/UL 2075 and ANSI/UL 268. See Section of this code for additional requirements specific to the installation of smoke alarms.

405 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Power source Carbon monoxide alarms. Single station carbon monoxide alarms shall be battery operated, or may receive their primary power from the building wiring system. Plug in devices securely fastened to the structure and installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions are deemed to satisfy this requirement. Hard wired and plug in carbon

406 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Carbon monoxide alarms, con’t monoxide alarms shall be equipped with battery back up Household carbon monoxide detection systems. Required power supply sources for household carbon monoxide detection systems shall be in accordance with NFPA 720.

407 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Combination smoke/carbon monoxide alarms/detectors. Combination smoke/carbon monoxide alarms/detectors shall receive their power source in accordance with Section and NFPA 72. Smoke alarm features of combination smoke/carbon monoxide alarms shall be interconnected. Exception: Interconnection and hard wiring of combination smoke/carbon monoxide

408 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Combination smoke/carbon monoxide alarms/detectors, con’t Alarms/detectors in existing areas shall not be required where the alterations or repairs do not result in the removal of interior wall or ceiling finishes exposing the structure Where required in existing affected occupancies. Here a new carbon monoxide

409 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Where required in existing affected occupancies, con’t source is introduced or work requiring a structural permit occurs in existing Group R occupancies, carbon monoxide alarms shall be provided in accordance with Section through of this code. Exception: Work involving the exterior surfaces

410 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Where required in existing affected occupancies, con’t of affected occupancies, such as the replacement of roofing or siding, or the addition or replacement of windows or doors, or the addition of a porch or deck, are exempt from the requirements of this section. Testing and maintenance. Carbon

411 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Testing and maintenance, con’t monoxide alarms shall be maintained and tested in accordance with Section

412 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Section Means of Egress for Existing Buildings Examination. Fire escape stairs, and balconies, rails and ladders shall be examined for structural adequacy and safety in accordance with Section and the Oregon Structural Specialty Code by a registered design professional or others acceptable to the fire code official every five years, or as required by the fire This was a mid cycle Oregon amendment in the 2010 OFC. Fire escapes are require an inspection by a registered design professional or persons acceptable to the fire code official no more than every 5 years.

413 Chapter 46 11 Fire and Life Safety Requirements for Existing Buildings
Examination, con’t code official. An inspection report shall be submitted to the fire code official after such examination. Exception: The testing interval for fire escapes that have all connections replaced, re-enforced, and/or duplicated may be extended as specified by the design professional if approved by the fire code official.

414 These chapters are reserved for future expansion of the code.
Chapter 12 through 19 These chapters are reserved for future expansion of the code.

415 Chapter Dry Cleaning Section Fire Protection Automatic sprinkler system. An automatic sprinkler system shall be installed in accordance with Section throughout dry cleaning plants containing Type II, Type III-A or Type III-B dry cleaning systems. Exceptions: New exceptions allow dry cleaning plants using Class III-A or Class III-B combustible liquids in nonsprinklered buildings.

416 Chapter Dry Cleaning Automatic sprinkler system, con’t 1. An automatic sprinkler system shall not be required in Type III-A dry cleaning plants where the aggregate quantity of Class III-A solvent in dry cleaning machines and storage does not exceed 330 gallons (1250 L) and dry cleaning machines are equipped with a feature that will accomplish any one of the following: Exception 1 waives the requirement for sprinklers when the aggregate quantity of Class III-A solvent in the dry cleaning machine and storage is 300 gallons or less. A second condition to exception 1 is the dry cleaning machine must be equipped with a control satifying one of the 5 requirements list in exception 1.

417 Chapter Dry Cleaning Automatic sprinkler system, con’t 1.1 Prevent oxygen concentrations from reaching 8 percent or more by volume. 1.2 Keep the temperature of the solvent at least 300 F (16.70 C) below the flash point. 1.3 Maintain the solvent vapor concentration at a level lower than 25 percent of the lower explosive limit (LEL). 1.4 Utilize equipment approved for use in

418 Chapter Dry Cleaning Automatic sprinkler system, con’t Class I, Division 2 hazardous locations in accordance with NFPA Utilize an intergrated dry-chemical clean agent or water-mist autoamtic fire-extinguishing system designed in accordance with Chapter An automatic sprinkler system shall not be Exception 2 allows dry cleaning machinery using Class III-B solvents in an unsprinklered building if the total amount of liquid in the machine and storage is 3,300 gallons or less. When a Class III-B solvent is used, the controls prescribed in Section , Exception 1 are not applicable.

419 Chapter Dry Cleaning Automatic sprinkler system, con’t required in Type III-B dry cleaning plants where the aggregate quantity of Class III-B solvent in dry cleaning machines and storage does not exceed 3,300 gallons ( L).

420 Chapter 22 23 Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
Section Dispensing Operations Obstruction to view. Persons dispensing fuel must remain outside the vehicle being fueled, with the fueling nozzle in full view at all times. This is a new Oregon amendment to the 2014 OFC. It is designed to require cardlock or fleet fueling persons to remain outside the vehicle while the fueling operation is occurring.

421 Chapter 22 23 Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
Section Operational Requirements Tank filling operations for Class I, II or III-A liquids. Delivery operations to tanks for Class I, II or III-A liquids shall comply with Sections through and the applicable requirements of Chapter Repairs and service. The fire was changed to require dispensing of 100% biodiesel, Class III-B liquid, to meet the same requirements as other fuels.

422 Chapter 22 23 Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
Repairs and service, con’t code official is authorized to require damaged or unsafe containment and dispensing equipment to be repaired or serviced in an approved manner including, but limited to, equipment that shows signs of physical damage, internal and external corrosion, leakage, brittleness, aging or undue wear and tear. removed extraneous provisions which proved difficult to interpret and enforce. The revised code text improves the provision because any condition that is deemed unsafe or is the result of damage now must be repaired or serviced in an approved manner. An “approved manner” includes replacement or components in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions.

423 Chapter 22 23 Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
Section Marine Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities Supervision. Marine motor fuel-dispensing facilities shall have an attendant or supervisor who is fully aware of the operation, mechanics and hazards inherent to fueling of boats on duty whenever the facility is open for business. The attendant’s primary function shall be to supervise, observe and control the dispensing of

424 Chapter 22 23 Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
Supervision, con’t Class I, II or IIIA liquids or flammable gases. Exception: Gasoline dispensing by qualified customers at licensed nonretail dispensing facilities. This new Oregon amendment was added because cardlock rules allow boat operators to fuel their boats as long as it is at a registered cardlock operation.

425 Chapter 22 23 Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
Section Repair Garages System design. The flammable gas detection system shall be listed or approved and shall be calibrated to the types of fuels or gases used by vehicles to be repaired. Gas detectors or sensors shall be listed in accordance with UL 2075 and shall indicate the gases they are intended to detect. The gas detection system shall be This section was modified by adding a new Section

426 Chapter 22 23 Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
System design, con’t designed to activate when the level of flammable gas exceeds 25 percent of the lower flammable limit (LFL). Gas detection shall also be provided in lubrication or chassis service pits of repair garages used for repairing nonodorized LNG-fueled vehicles Gas detection system components. Gas detection system control units shall be listed Gas detection control units shall be listed and labeled in accordance with UL 864 or UL 2017. Gas detectors shall be listed and labeled in accordance with UL 2075. These changes were also made to Section for Highly Toxic and Toxic Gases.

427 Chapter 22 23 Motor Fuel-Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
Gas detection system components, con’t and labeled in accordance with UL 864 or UL Gas detectors shall be listed and labeled in accordance with UL 2075 for use with gasses and vapors being detected.

428 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Section General Safety Provisions Combustible tools. Where the horizontal surface of a combustible tool is obstructed from ceiling sprinkler discharge, automatic sprinkler protection that covers the horizontal surface of the tool shall be provided. Exceptions: 1. An automatic gaseous fire-extinguishing local

429 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Combustible tools, con’t surface application system shall be allowed as an alternative to sprinklers. Gaseous-extinguishing systems shall be actuated by infrared (IR) or ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) optical detectors. 2. Tools constructed of materials that are listed as Class 1 or Class 2 in accordance with UL 2360 or approved for use without internal fire extinguishing system protection. Exception 2 allows combustible semiconductor tools such as wet benches to be used without the requirement for an automatic fire extinguishing system when they are constructed of listed polymeric materials. Exception 2 now permits the use of plastics listed as being compliant with UL 2360 in the construction of combustible semiconductor tools in lieu of providing an automatic fire extinguishing system, UL 2360, Standard for Test Methods for Determining the Combustibility Characteristics of Plastics Used in Semiconductor Tool Construction.

430 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Sub-atmospheric pressure gas systems. Sub-atmospheric pressure gas systems (SAGS) shall be in accordance with NFPA 318. Section Use and Handling Corridors and exit enclosures for stairways and ramps. Corridors and exit enclosures stairways and ramps in new buildings or is a new section that now permits the storage and use of gases in Sub-Atmospheric Pressure Gas Systems (SAGS) when they are installed in accordance with NFPA 318, Standard for the Protection of Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities. SAGS are designed so that gas must be removed from the cylinder using vacuum. In comparison to conventional compressed gas systems where gas is released because of its stored energy. SAGS either inherently remove this risk or mitigate it using mechanical controls. In SAGS, the loss of vacuum pressure stops the gas flow.

431 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Corridors and enclosures for stairways and ramps, con’t serving new fabrication areas shall not contain HPM except as permitted for corridors by Section of the International Building Code and Section of this code. now allows HPMs to be transported in means of egress corridors or exits enclosures in quantities that are less than the maximum allowable quantity per control area (MAQ) valuse in Tables (1) and (2).

432 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Transport in existing corridors and enclosures for stairways and ramps. Transport in corridors and enclosures for stairways and ramps shall be in accordance with Sections through When existing fabrication areas are altered or modified in existing buildings. HPM is allowed to be transported in existing corridors when such exit access corridors comply with the International Building Code. transportation in corridors shall comply with Section This section identifies the requirements for HPM transport in Corridors, and stairways and ramp enclosures.

433 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Fabrication area alterations. When existing favrication area are altered or modified in existing buildings, HPM is allowed to be transported in existing corrisdors when such corridors comply with Section of this code and Section of the International Building Code. This new section is a road map to Section and Section of the IBC. When exit corridors in existing fabrication areas are altered, they are required to be compliant with IBC Section

434 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
HPM transport in corridors and enclosures for stairways and ramps. Nonproduction HPM is allowed to be transported in corridors and enclosures for stairways and ramps where utilized for maintenance, lab work and testing when the transportation is in accordance with Section Service corridors. When a new fabrication area is constructed, a service corridor shall requires that the transportation of the hazardous materials comply with Section , which establishes a number of requirements for on-site transportation of hazardous materials.

435 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Service corridors, con’t be provided where it is necessary to transport HPM from a liquid storage room, HPM room, gas room or from the outside of a building to the perimeter wall of a fabrication area. Service corridors shall be designed and constructed in accordance with the International Building Code Carts and trucks. Carts and truck No changes to Section

436 Chapter 18 27 Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Carts and trucks, con’t used to transport HPM in exit access corridors and exit enclosures for stairways and ramps in existing buildings shall comply with Section has added enclosures for stairways and ramps and removed the words “existing buildings”. So all carts and trucks must comply with Section whether the building is existing or new.

437 Chapter 20 29 Manufacture of Organic Coatings
Section Raw Materials and Finished Products Organic peroxide storage. The storage of organic peroxides shall be in accordance with Chapter Size. The size of the package containing organic peroxide shall be selected so that, as nearly as practical, full packages are utilized at is a new section in Chapter 29, Manufacture of Organic Coating. It directs the code user to Chapter 62, Organic Peroxides for storage requirements. regulates the size of packages to be utilized because left organic peroxide poses a storage and handling problem. Most organic peroxides become increasingly unstable if contaminated with foreign materials.

438 Chapter 20 29 Manufacture of Organic Coatings
Size, con’t one time. Spilled peroxide shall be promptly cleaned up and disposed of as specified by the supplier Finished product. Finished products that are flammable or combustible liquids shall be stored outside of structures, in a separate structure, or in a room separated from the requires finished product that is a flammable or combustible liquid be stored some where separate from the processing area.

439 Chapter 20 29 Manufacture of Organic Coatings
Finished product, con’t processing area in accordance with the International Building Code. The storage of finished products shall be in tanks or closed containers in accordance with Chapter 57.

440 Chapter 23 32 High-Piled Combustible Storage
Section Rack Storage Flue space protection. Where required by the fire code official, flue spaces required by Table , in single-, double- or multiple-row rack storage installations shall be equipped with approved devices to protect the required flue space. Such devices shall not be removed or modified. In high-piled combustible storage using storage racks, flue spaces are an important component of the fire protection design. This new section allows the installation of approved devices designed to protect flue spaces from obstruction can be required by the fire code official.