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Airports vs. Airlines: Who owns the customer? Mike Luddy, CCO, Gatwick Airport Nigel Dolby, MD, Dolby & Holder Consulting.

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Presentation on theme: "Airports vs. Airlines: Who owns the customer? Mike Luddy, CCO, Gatwick Airport Nigel Dolby, MD, Dolby & Holder Consulting."— Presentation transcript:

1 Airports vs. Airlines: Who owns the customer? Mike Luddy, CCO, Gatwick Airport Nigel Dolby, MD, Dolby & Holder Consulting

2 Your London Airport, Gatwick Mike Luddy, Chief Commercial Officer

3 Gatwick Owned by Global Infrastructure since December m passengers per annum More UK residents use Gatwick than any other Airport Average spend per departing pax of over £5 Generating over £200m non aero income

4 The new Gatwick brand The new Gatwick script logo and Your Airport sign-off describes Gatwicks positioning as a more human Airport

5 The Gatwick Retail Vision Everyday, Gatwick is focussed on its passengers and delivering their needs in a more personal way For RETAIL, this means: – INSPIRATION a vibrant space that sends you on your travels with a smile – OPPORTUNITY more time to eat and shop, meeting all your needs – EXCITEMENT the brands you love, delivered with style

6 The passenger journey

7 Only an Airport can truly own the passenger at the Airport Passengers are generally in a positive state of mind when they enter the IDL. After having been through the stressful processes of check-in and security they now begin to relax and feel that their holiday has begun – 68% of passengers surveyed entered the IDL feeling positive, of those who were feeling negative (32%), 11% were tired and 7% were hungry – passengers who were in a positive state of mind were more likely to browse around the shops and go for something to eat whilst those in a negative state of mind were more likely to go straight to the gate or find somewhere to sit Immediately after entering the IDL the top three things passengers did were go to the toilets, go somewhere to eat or go to the newsagents – of those who went to either shop or eat immediately, 48% went to shop for essentials (newsagents, pharmacy and currency exchange ) first

8 When passengers enter the IDL they begin to relax and feel that their holiday has begun Only an Airport can truly own the passenger at the Airport

9 Overwhelmingly, the vast majority of passengers want to shop when they are at the Airport not on the plane 87% of passengers are looking to purchase something in the IDL, be it a planned or unplanned purchase –of this 87% - 39% say they will look around and buy something if it catches their eye, 22% buy essentials for their trip, 17% are looking for planned purchases and 9% want to treat themselves –only 13% of passengers said they try to avoid shopping altogether 62% of passengers both shopped and visited a catering outlet whilst in the IDL Average reported dwell in time in the IDL is 1 hour 5 mins and during the Easter Peak this was increased to 1 hour 20 mins based on average recorded times to shop and eat in the IDL, passengers have enough time to buy essentials, eat and browse around the shops Passengers want to shop, as well as eat, when they are in the IDL and their dwell time allows them to do both Passengers want to shop, as well as eat, when they are in the IDL and their dwell time allows them to do both

10 Who are these shoppers – Picture Profiles These are the typical targets – the 25 – 34 year singles / couples with no children

11 Priority Passenger Segment – Word Cloud Key characteristics that depicts their typical lifestyles

12 Priority Passenger Segment - Lifestyle Young (25-34), well educated, no children Pioneers or Hunters of new and emerging trends for both fashion, eating and lifestyle activities Live in, or close to city centres in desirable locations Are wealthy, or are rapidly realising their high earnings potential Carefree about how they spend, living life to the full, working is a means to fund their active social lives They travel frequently both to European cities and to exciting and exotic locations The passengers in the priority segment all have the same common characteristics

13 What do they want Typical brands that will excite and attract this priority segment

14 How do they want it? …..airports need to get smarter at delivering to needs Fashion Lifestyle Accessories Technology Duty and tax Free Passenger Segment Grab and Go Essentials Flight Info Toilets CTN Chemist Bureau Sizzle

15 Space in Priority Order Where does the airline fit in ? Passenger Essentials Shopping Core Essentials Food & Beverage Essentials Specialist Retail Shops Retail Innovation / Experiential Services Toilets Seating Flight Information Display Screens PRM Points of orientation CTN Chemist Foreign Exchange Duty Free Shopping Coffee Bars / Shops Fast / Snack / Quick Food outlets Pub / Bars Full table service outlets Niche outlets Department store Fashion Accessories Technology Lifestyle Digital Kiosks / Pods Mobile Pop-up Pods Entertainment zones Pay as you go Zones Interactivities

16 Why Airports own the passenger... at the Airport Passengers want to be released so they can eat and shop they want more aspirational brands and choice then an airline will ever deliver they have over 1hr of free time they want to browse and impulse buy airline sales is a secondary purchase and only appeals to the lower end of the market If we don't compete then why don't we work together to maximise?

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