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PBIS at HOME: Continuing a Positive Behavior Program at the End of the School Day Carrie Frost, LCSW-R Jennifer Arroyo, M. Ed.

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Presentation on theme: "PBIS at HOME: Continuing a Positive Behavior Program at the End of the School Day Carrie Frost, LCSW-R Jennifer Arroyo, M. Ed."— Presentation transcript:

1 PBIS at HOME: Continuing a Positive Behavior Program at the End of the School Day Carrie Frost, LCSW-R Jennifer Arroyo, M. Ed.

2 PBIS is a system of supports that include proactive strategies for defining, teaching, and supporting appropriate student behaviors to create positive school environments. Instead of using a patchwork of individual behavioral management plans, a continuum of positive behavior support for all students within a school is implemented in areas including the classroom and non-classroom settings (such as bus, hallways, restrooms).

3 GAMS GREAT EXPECTATIONS BE SAFE BE RESPECTFUL BE RESPONSIBLE BE READY

4 We Teach Our Students Exactly What These Expectations LOOK LIKE in Our Classrooms and in Our Common Areas (ie. Hallways, Cafeteria, Bus, Bathrooms, Playground, etc.) So That Every Student Learns the Same Skills. Modeling Role Playing Teaching and Re- Teaching Asking Questions

5 This Year, PBIS at GAMS is Focusing On Behaviors in Common Areas Students will be especially focused on learning and practicing positive behaviors when they leave the classroom.

6 We Praise and Reward Students When We See Them Using What They Have Learned!

7 Teachers and Staff Catch students demonstrating positive behaviors, and then they are given a Gotcha ticket. These tickets are placed in a classroom jar. Each time a classroom receives 100 tickets, the class receives a special privilege. In this way, the whole class encourages each other and works together to show positive behavior. Each quarter, students that have followed the Expectations (no bus or school write-ups) will also participate in special school-wide celebrations.

8 PBIS is a Positive Program and DOES NOT Replace or Connect With Discipline! PBIS encourages positive behaviors, so that you confront negative behaviors less often. In PBIS, you can only EARN privileges; they CANNOT be taken away after they are earned! In Other Words, PBIS and Discipline are Separate!

9 When you practice a Positive Behavioral Program at Home, you accomplish two things: You support what your child is learning at school, and you create better behaviors outside of school.

10 PBIS at Home IN FIVE EASY STEPS… LEARN THE EXPECTATIONS USE THE LANGUAGE BE A SUPERMODEL! MAKE IT A REWARDING EXPERIENCE COMMUNICATION IS KEY!

11 LEARN THE EXPECTATIONS Think about what it means to be SAFE, RESPECTFUL, RESPONSIBLE, and READY (prepared) in your home. Focus on behaviors that you can SEE and your child can easily understand (for example, being safe in the kitchen might mean keeping your hands away from the stove; being responsible might mean cleaning up after dinner). Include your child in this activity and make them think! Write down what you have decided on a poster for your home.

12 A SAMPLE POSTER… SAFERESPECTFULRESPONSIBLEREADY KITCHENCALM BODY HANDS TO SELF PARENT PRESENT TAKE ONLY WHAT YOU NEED SHARE CLEAN UP AFTER YOURSELF HELP MOM WITH CHORES WASH HANDS BEFORE EATING BATHROOMWASH HANDSEVERYONE GETS A TURN PRIVACY BRUSH YOUR TEETH 2X/DAY CLEAN UP SINK BE IN THE SHOWER AT YOUR TIME EACH DAY BEDROOMCALM BODY ON BED KEEP VOICES DOWN EVERYONE GETS SOME PRIVACY PUT TOYS AWAY AND MAKE BED EACH DAY READY FOR BED AT 8PM ***BE POSITIVE***

13 Positive Wording (No Nos!) Dont Run WALK No Hitting HANDS TO YOURSELF Stop jumping around KEEP YOUR BODY CALM

14 USE THE LANGUAGE Think about the words you use when you are trying to teach one of your expectations at home, and replace those words with the Expectations. For example, if your child is throwing a ball inside the house, instead of saying Dont throw the ball in the house, ask them, Are you being SAFE?. Ask, Why not?- the purpose of PBIS is to get children to THINK about their behavior and to PROBLEM SOLVE. Follow up by asking Where is a SAFE place to throw the ball?. PBIS language is SIMPLE, but it takes PRACTICE to use it every day.

15 BE A SUPERMODEL Our children learn behavioral skills from us! Demonstrate for your child what you would like to see from them. Model what positive behavior looks like, and even what it doesnt look like! Put on skits or plays at home-dont be afraid to look silly or to have fun! The more you practice, the more your child will learn (and respect) the Expectations! TEACHING THE EXPECTATIONS

16 THINK SIMPLE FIRST DONT WORRY ABOUT TEACHING EVERY BEHAVIOR IN EVERY AREA AT ONCE…THINK ABOUT AN EXPECTATION (IE. BEING SAFE) OR AN AREA (IE. BEDTIME) THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO FOCUS ON, AND START WITH THAT

17 MAKE IT A REWARDING EXPERIENCE! Positive Behavior is LEARNED. Children are not intrinsically motivated to show positive behavior…they learn to do it because of the reaction they get from us! While children will learn from positive or negative consequences, they are more motivated and create lifetime motivation (not just when we are around) when consequences are positive.

18 Creating a Reward System Thats Easy for Everyone Talk with your child about things that they like to do and things they enjoy and create a list. Remember, a special privilege doesnt have to cost a thing; it could mean extra time together, a trip to the park, a movie at home, a late bedtime, or a trip to the library. The thing most children want is time with you! Create a daily way to keep track of the positive behavior you are focusing on…younger children tend to like stickers or smiley faces on a chart, and older kids might like a Responsibility Chart that they can check off themselves. Younger children need more reinforcement, so you might have to check in with them more often during the day. Create the ground rules about how a privilege will be earned and when the child will receive it (ie. If the child earns a late bedtime, this may have to be cashed in on weekends only) and discuss it with your child in advance so everyone is clear on the rules. Remember, the privilege a child earns for the behavior you choose is separate from discipline…if a child earns a privilege for going to bed on time each day, he/she will still earn it even if they have misbehaved in another way…you discipline the other behavior!

19 MY BEDTIME CHECKLIST MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday I Was Responsible! I Brushed My Teeth! I Was Ready! Put on my Pajamas! I was Ready and Respectful! I Went to Bed on Time by Myself!

20 My Responsibility Chart SatSunMonTue Wed Thur Fri Expected Behaviors Brushing Teeth Getting Your Own Breakfast Homework Making Bed Put Laundry in Hamper Room Clean Shower One Check= One Point TOTAL: _____ 45 Points= Privilege

21 The Most Important Thing is Good Communication Talk regularly with your child about what they are learning about PBIS Read about PBIS in our School Handbook or Hootin Newton Talk to your childs teacher about how to support your childs PBIS program. Use the PBIS language with your child as often as you can and THINK POSITIVE! Volunteer for upcoming PBIS events Even if a Positive Behavior Program is Not for You…..

22 Your Childs Success Begins With You! For More Information, Visit


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