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Other Applicable PIT Standards n ANSI/ITSDF ( B56.1-2009 n ANSI/ITSDF (INDUSTRIAL TRUCK STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION) B56.1-2009 n 2/2/2004 ANSI/UL.

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Presentation on theme: "Other Applicable PIT Standards n ANSI/ITSDF ( B56.1-2009 n ANSI/ITSDF (INDUSTRIAL TRUCK STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION) B56.1-2009 n 2/2/2004 ANSI/UL."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Other Applicable PIT Standards n ANSI/ITSDF ( B n ANSI/ITSDF (INDUSTRIAL TRUCK STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION) B n 2/2/2004 ANSI/UL Standard for Safety for Electric-Battery- Powered Industrial Trucks n 3/2/2005 ANSI/NFPA Storage and Handling of Liquefied Petroleum Gases n 3/21/2005 ANSI/UL Standard for Safety for Internal Combustion-Engine-Powered Industrial Trucks n 4/13/2005 ANSI/NFPA Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code n 4/21/2005 ANSI/NFPA Fire Safety Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks Including Type Designations, Areas of Use, Maintenance, and Operation n 7/23/2005 ANSI/IES RP Practice for Industrial Lighting (not a safety standard) n 7/23/2005 ANSI Z Environmental and Facility Safety Signs 2

3 Reasons for Training n Powered industrial truck accidents cause approximately 36,340 serious injuries in general industry and construction annually. n It is estimated that % of the accidents are, at least in part, caused by inadequate training. n Review changes to policy and procedure n Required by OSHA

4 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics n An average of 94 workers are killed each year as a result of forklift accidents.

5 Defining PIT n A mobile, power-propelled truck used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack or tier materials. n Excluded are vehicles used for earth moving and over-the-road hauling. n Commonly known as forklifts, pallet trucks, rider trucks, fork trucks, or lift trucks. n Can be powered through electric or combustion engines.

6 Class I - Electric Motor Rider Trucks n Counterbalanced rider type, stand up n Three wheel electric trucks, sit- down n Counterbalanced rider type, cushion tires, sit-down (high and low platform) n Counterbalanced rider, pneumatic tire, sit-down (high and low platform)

7 Class II - Electric Motor Narrow Aisle Trucks n High lift straddle n Order picker n Reach type outrigger n Side loaders, turret trucks, swing mast and convertible turret/stock pickers n Low lift pallet and platform (rider)

8 Class III - Electric Motor Hand or Hand/Rider Trucks n Low lift platform n Low lift walkie pallet n Reach type outrigger n High lift straddle n High lift counterbalanced n Low lift walkie/rider pallet

9 Class IV - Internal Combustion Engine Trucks - Cushion (Solid) Tires

10 Class V - Internal Combustion Engine Trucks (Pneumatic Tires)

11 Class VI - Electric & Internal Combustion Engine Tractors

12 Class VII - Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks

13 Rough Terrain Straight Mast Forklifts

14 Rough Terrain Extended-Reach Forklifts

15 Powered Industrial Trucks Used in Maritime

16 Yard Trucks not used OTR Based on this section of the standard, a yard tractor that operates off-road would fall under the scope of the standard due to the fact that it can be classified as a tractor or other specialized industrial truck powered by an electric motor or internal combustion engine. Additionally, yard tractors fall into Class VI – Electric and Internal Combustion Engine Tractors of the forklift classification system. According to OSHA:

17 OSHA n Contains safety requirements relating to fire protection, design, maintenance, and use of fork trucks, tractors, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks, and other specialized industrial trucks powered by electric motors or internal combustion engines.

18 Attachments and Modifications n Specific operator training n Weight of attachments n Increased load center (a)(4)

19 (a)(5) If the truck is equipped with front-end attachments other than factory installed attachments, the user shall request that the truck be marked to identify the attachments and show the approximate weight of the truck and attachment combination at maximum elevation with load laterally centered.

20 (a)(6) The user shall see that all nameplates and markings are in place and are maintained in a legible condition.

21 (a)(6) Based on Verticle Uprights with Max. Fork Heights Up to 153 1/ RATED CAPACITIES Load Center--Distance from front face of forks to center of gravity load--inches.

22 NEC Hazardous Location Types Class Hazardous Material in Surrounding Atmosphere Class I Hazardous because flammable gases or vapors are present in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures. Class II Hazardous because combustible or conductive dusts are present. Class III Hazardous because ignitable fibers or flying's are present, but not likely to be in suspension in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures. (Group classifications are not applied to this class.) Division Presence of Hazardous Material Division 1 The substance referred to by class is present during normal conditions. Division 2 The substance referred to by class is present only in abnormal conditions, such as a container failure or system breakdown. Classes The classes defines the general nature of hazardous material in the surrounding atmosphere. Divisions The division defines the probability of hazardous material being present in an ignitable concentration in the surrounding atmosphere. Also found in OSHA TABLE N SUMMARY TABLE ON USE OF INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS IN VARIOUS LOCATIONS (b)(12) The atmosphere or location shall have been classified as to whether it is hazardous or nonhazardous prior to the consideration of industrial trucks being used therein and the type of industrial truck required shall be as provided in paragraph (d) of this section for such location.

23 No ignition sources within 35 Maintain contact between nozzle and unit Fuel Handling and Storage (f) Stay with refueling process while actively refueling Clean spills immediately

24 Battery Charging n Inspect battery connectors for damage n No smoking in battery- charging area n Immediately clean up electrolyte spills n PPE includes face mask, acid- resistant gloves, and an apron

25 Preoperation Inspection n As an authorized operator, it is your responsibility to make sure your forklift functions properly n OSHA requires preoperation inspections n Your goal is to provide a hazard free workplace which includes maintaining equipment in the safest manner possible

26 Walk Around n Forklift properly disengaged Forks down, key off, neutral gear, parking brake on Forks down, key off, neutral gear, parking brake on n Left/right side Tire condition, tight lug nuts, no debris around axle, overhead guard is solid, no debris behind the mast Tire condition, tight lug nuts, no debris around axle, overhead guard is solid, no debris behind the mast n Front Forks in good shape, fork pins in place, backrest solid, mast & chains greased, hoses in good shape Forks in good shape, fork pins in place, backrest solid, mast & chains greased, hoses in good shape n Rear Counterbalance bolt is tight, radiator clear of debris Counterbalance bolt is tight, radiator clear of debris n Look for fluids on floor under vehicle Preoperation Inspection

27 n Nonmoving checks Gauges, lights, horn, back-up alarm, blinking warning light, operate the tilt & lift mechanism, check the parking brake Gauges, lights, horn, back-up alarm, blinking warning light, operate the tilt & lift mechanism, check the parking brake n Moving checks Put on the seat belt, check the running brakes, check the steering Put on the seat belt, check the running brakes, check the steering In the seat Preoperation Inspection

28 n Forklifts are designed to be safe: u Seatbelts u Horns u Lights (if equipped) u Cage n Three point mount/dismount Preoperation Inspection

29 n Avoid loose objects or holes n If load blocks view, travel in reverse n Never carry passengers n Pedestrians always have the right-of-way n Safe distance from edge of ramps or docks n Never eat or drink n No stunt driving or horseplay Operating a Lift Truck

30 n Only trained, authorized operators n Immediately report forklift-related incidents n No person should stand under elevated portion of lift truck n Forklift controls operated only from drivers seat n Never block exits or emergency equipment n Smoking is not permitted n Keep forks as low as safely possible Operating a Lift Truck

31 Always look in the direction of travel Always look in the direction of travel Keep body inside the cage Keep body inside the cage When moving, the mast must not be raised When moving, the mast must not be raised Sound the horn Sound the horn Operate at safe speeds Operate at safe speeds When turning, watch rear end swing When turning, watch rear end swing Clearance under overhead installations Clearance under overhead installations Operating a Lift Truck

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33 View is obscured by the masts Operating a Lift Truck Compare an automobile to a forklift

34 Operating a Lift Truck Compare a tugger (AKA Tow Tractor, Tow Motor, etc.) to a Forklift A typical configuration for a tugger includes one tugger and two to three carts. Each cart can carry the same dunnage as a forklift. Thus, a three cart system carries three times the dunnage of a forklift. A typical configuration for a tugger includes one tugger and two to three carts. Each cart can carry the same dunnage as a forklift. Thus, a three cart system carries three times the dunnage of a forklift. A forklift can travel in reverse while carrying a load. A forklift can travel in reverse while carrying a load.

35 35 Powered Pallet Jacks Gradually start and stop the jack to prevent the load from slipping Gradually start and stop the jack to prevent the load from slipping Ensure that your pathway is clear and that you will not trip backwards or run into obstacles. Ensure that your pathway is clear and that you will not trip backwards or run into obstacles. Keep your body and your coworkers clear of the pallet jack to avoid being crushed by the machine Keep your body and your coworkers clear of the pallet jack to avoid being crushed by the machine Never ride on a pallet jack and avoid horseplay when you are using one. Never ride on a pallet jack and avoid horseplay when you are using one. Watch for coworkers and obstacles at all times when you are using an electric pallet jack Watch for coworkers and obstacles at all times when you are using an electric pallet jack

36 Operating a Lift Truck Compare an automobile to a forklift

37 Pedestrians Pedestrians Ramps Ramps Slippery floors Slippery floors Weak trailer floors Weak trailer floors While handling a load: While handling a load: Large/bulky Large/bulky Uneven weight Uneven weight Broken pallet Broken pallet Poorly stacked Poorly stacked Others? Others? Poor lighting Poor lighting Congestion Congestion Jack stands missing Jack stands missing Operating a Lift Truck

38 n Tipping Over u Do not jump u Hold onto the steering wheel u Brace your feet u Lean away from the fall u Stay in the cage!!! Operating a Lift Truck

39 town, along Highway 44. Although the details were limited Tuesday night, the Jim Wells County Sheriffs Department tells us that the man was operating a forklift in the back of the store, when he lost control, fell off and was somehow pinned underneath it. He died at around 4:30 PM, about an hour after the incident at Christus Spohn Alice medical center. Case Study n April 25, 2008 Corpus Christi A 19-year-old man was killed Tuesday in a forklift accident at the Tractor Supply Company in Alice. Sources have identified the victim as Michael Gomez of the Benbolt area. The Tractor Supply Company just opened a few weeks ago. Its located on the east end of

40 n April 11, 2008 Spokane Washington A Spokane man suffered fatal injuries in a forklift accident in Kendrick Friday morning. Officials said at about 9:30 the Latah County Sheriffs office responded to a report of an industrial accident at Brocke and Sons warehouse in Kendrick. Authorities said 26-year-old Darrell Noakes was negotiating the forklift in an outdoor area near the warehouse when it rolled onto its side, landing on top of Noakes. According to reports, the forklift wasnt carrying anything at the time. No other injuries were reported in the accident. Case Study

41 n March 06, 2008 Mount Union A 38-year-old man is dead following an accident involving a forklift at a Snyder County construction site. State police identify the victim as 38-year-old Ronald Collins, of Mount Union. The accident happened Wednesday at the Monroe Marketplace construction site in Hummels Wharf. Police say Collins was walking alongside the forklift and was run over by the back wheel. A Snyder County deputy coroner says he died at the scene of a traumatic head injury. Case Study

42 Stability Triangle 3-point suspension Forklifts center of gravity Forklifts center of gravity Combined center of gravity Combined center of gravity Load center beyond 24 Load center beyond 24

43 Center of Gravity Balance point 48 A B 2040 Distance from the edge of the item to the items center of gravity

44 n Distance from vertical face of the forks to the loads center of gravity Typical Load center = 24" Typical Load center = 24" 80 B 1 inch = 100 lbs 1 inch = 100 lbs Important reason for keeping the load resting against the vertical face of forks Important reason for keeping the load resting against the vertical face of forks Center of Gravity

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46 Loading/Unloading n Before raising a load, understand: Approximate weight of the load Approximate weight of the load Location of the loads center of gravity Location of the loads center of gravity n Inspect load for stability, projections, damaged pallets before lifting n Restack unstable loads n Never place weight on the back of a lift truck to increase its capacity n Towing always done from rear towing pin n Tilt the load back for better load stability n Keep forks low when traveling with a load (ideal 4 above driving surface)

47 Ramps and Railroads n Never turn on a ramp n On ramps the load should be upgrade n Ascend or descend ramps slowly n Railroad tracks are crossed diagonally n Never park within 8 feet of the center of railroad tracks

48 Dock Safety n Inspect the dock plate n Check the trailer floor condition n Trailer wheels are chocked, and/or docks are locked. n Nose of the trailer is supported by the tractor or a fixed jack

49 Docks n Seat belts must always be worn Date: September 2, 2003 Early Departure A service crew employee was unloading a trailer containing roll banding materials. The employee had made a trip into the trailer and was beginning to enter the trailer again when the truck driver pulled away from the dock. The front wheels of the forklift were practically off of the dock and the employee had his foot firmly on the brake. When the forklift operator released his foot from the brake the forklift fell forward off of the dock landing on the mast as shown in this photo. The forklift operator was wearing his seat belt keeping him from being injured by being thrown into the mast or other support structure.

50 Parking n Lower the forks n Set gear to neutral n Set the parking brake n Turn off the key When is a PIT considered unattended? 1. When the operator is 25 or more away from vehicle 2. When the operator leaves the vehicle and the vehicle is no longer in his/her view 3. Neither 1 nor 2 4. Both 1 and 2

51 (l)(1)(i) The employer shall ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation specified in this paragraph (l) (l)(1)(i) The employer shall ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation specified in this paragraph (l) (l)(1)(ii) Prior to permitting an employee to operate a powered industrial truck (except for training purposes), the employer shall ensure that each operator has successfully completed the training required by this paragraph (l), except as permitted by paragraph (l)(5) (l)(1)(ii) Prior to permitting an employee to operate a powered industrial truck (except for training purposes), the employer shall ensure that each operator has successfully completed the training required by this paragraph (l), except as permitted by paragraph (l)(5). Training Program (l)

52 n Trainees may operate a powered industrial truck only: u Under direct supervision of a person who has the knowledge, training, and experience to train operators and evaluate their competence; and, u Where such operation does not endanger the trainee or other employees. Training Program (l)

53 n Training shall consist of a combination of: u Formal instruction (e.g., lecture, discussion, interactive computer learning, written material), u Practical training (demonstrations and exercises performed by the trainee), and u Evaluation of the operators performance in the workplace Training Program (l)

54 u Operating instructions, warnings and precautions u Differences from automobile u Controls and instrumentation u Engine or motor operation u Steering and maneuvering u Visibility u Operating Limitations n Truck-related topics u Fork and attachment adaptation, operation, use u Vehicle capacity and stability u Vehicle inspection and maintenance that the operator will be required to perform u Refueling/Charging/ Recharging batteries u Other instructions, etc. Training Program (l)

55 u Surface conditions u Composition and stability of loads u Load manipulation, stacking, unstacking u Pedestrian traffic u Narrow aisles and restricted areas u Operating in hazardous (classified) locations u Operating on ramps and sloped surfaces u Potentially hazardous environmental conditions u Operating in closed environments or other areas where poor ventilation or maintenance could cause carbon monoxide or diesel exhaust buildup n Workplace-related topics Training Program (l)

56 The requirements of the OSHA standard on powered industrial trucks must also be included in the initial operator training program. Training Program (l)

57 An evaluation of each powered industrial truck operators performance must be conducted: After initial training, After refresher training, and At least once every three years Refresher and Remedial Training

58 Unsafe operation Unsafe operation Accident or near-miss Accident or near-miss Evaluation indicates need Evaluation indicates need Different type of equipment introduced Different type of equipment introduced Workplace condition changes Workplace condition changes Refresher and Remedial Training

59 An authorized operator… n is trained and authorized to operate a powered industrial truck n should keep unauthorized employees off of forklifts n should keep pedestrians away from the operating zone of a forklift n will lock out unsafe lifts as determined in a preoperation inspection

60 Summary BE SAFE!!!


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