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Chapter 3 Making Decisions Section 3-1 Your Needs and Wants.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 3 Making Decisions Section 3-1 Your Needs and Wants."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Chapter 3 Making Decisions

3 Section 3-1 Your Needs and Wants

4 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objectives Define needs and wants. List basic physical and emotional needs. Explain how wants are different from needs. © michaeljung/Shutterstock

5 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Needs Versus Wants Needs are the basic items you must have to liveNeeds Wants are the extra items you would like to have, but are not necessary to liveWants Needs and wants affect –how you use your time, skills, and talents –your feelings –how you get along with others

6 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Maslows Theory of Human Needs

7 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Physical Needs Basic Physical Needs continued Food Clothing Shelter

8 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Physical Needs People must meet their basic physical needs before they can fulfill other needs and wants Some people are unable to meet their own physical needs –Babies and children –People who are sick or have special needs –Victims of disasters continued

9 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Physical Needs You can help others meet their physical needs by –giving goods to a food bank –donating money to charity –volunteering time © mangostock/Shutterstock

10 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Emotional Needs Basic emotional needs include –feeling safe and secure –being liked by others –gaining recognition –feeling good about yourself –reaching your full potential Having new experiences is also important continued

11 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Emotional Needs Knowing you are safe from harm and that your belongings are safe helps a person feel more secure, relaxed, and happy continued © bikeriderlondon/Shutterstock

12 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Emotional Needs You can help meet emotional needs by –developing and maintaining friendships and relationships –joining groups or clubs –participating in sports, academics, the arts –trying new experiences

13 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Did You Know? There are both healthful and unhealthful ways to meet basic emotional needs. Healthful ways allow you to meet your needs without preventing you from meeting other needs.

14 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Wants Basic needs are limited, but wants can be unlimited Fulfilling wants can make your life more satisfying, but it is important to consider how your wants affect others

15 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Think Further How can fulfilling your wants cause others to not meet their needs? © Golden Pixels LLC/Shutterstock

16 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-1 Review How are needs different from wants? needs are basic items you must have to live; wants are extra items you would like to have, but are not necessary to live List two emotional needs in Maslows theory of human needs. (List two:) security, love and acceptance, esteem

17 Section 3-2 Your Resources

18 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objectives Define resources, human resources, nonhuman resources, private resources, community resources, and scarce. List the different types of resources. Explain how resources can be developed. Describe ways in which resources can be used.

19 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Resources Resources are assets that can be used to meet needs and fulfill wantsResources You need resources to reach goals now and in the future © william casey/Shutterstock

20 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Types of Resources Human resources (also called personal resources) are the qualities and traits people have within themselves to get what they need or wantHuman resources –Knowledge, skills, and talents –Health, energy, and time –Personality, creativity, and work habits continued

21 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Think Further What are five of your most important human resources? How can you use these resources to help others? © Adrian Britton/Shutterstock

22 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Types of Resources Nonhuman resources are objects and conditions available to people to help them meet needs and fulfill wantsNonhuman resources –Material resources, or objects you own –Environmental resources, or assets found in nature continued

23 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Types of Resources Private resources are owned and controlled by a person or familyPrivate resources –Income –House –Car –Possessions continued © Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock

24 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Types of Resources Community resources (also called public resources) are paid for through taxes and shared by everyoneCommunity resources –Public schools –Roads –Parks –Libraries –Police and fire departments

25 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Using Resources Resources can be used in different ways You can trade one resource for another –For instance, time and skills can be traded for money Sometimes resources are in limited supply If a resource is scarce, it is important not to wastescarce

26 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Think Further How can you conserve water during a water shortage? © Skazka Grez/Shutterstock

27 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Developing Your Resources It is important to develop your resources so you can reach more of your goals You can develop your resources by –increasing your knowledge –learning new skills and improving your existing skills –finding new interests –improving your health continued

28 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Developing Your Resources How you choose to develop your resources is a decision you must make for yourself –Depends on needs and wants Some people have more resources than others, but everyone has special skills they can develop –Can help you to succeed later in life

29 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Think Further How can developing your human resources help you make better use of your nonhuman resources? © Eric Fahrner/Shutterstock

30 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-2 Review Objects and conditions available to people to help them meet needs and fulfill wants are called _____ resources. nonhuman What are private resources? resources owned and controlled by a person or a family continued

31 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-2 Review List two community resources. (List two:) public schools, roads, parks, libraries, fire and police protection What does the term scarce mean? limited in supply

32 Section 3-3 Your Values and Goals

33 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objectives Define values, goals, short-term goals, long- term goals, priorities, and standards. Give examples of values and goals. State how values and goals are related. Give examples of how values affect priorities.

34 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Values Your values provide direction for your actions and decisionsvalues Examples may include –freedom –service to others –strong family ties –views on religion, education, health, security continued

35 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Values You learn values from new experiences you continue to have throughout your life © jan kranendo/Shutterstock

36 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Think Further You also learn values from what others say and do. How have other people affected your values? © Lisa F. Young/Shutterstock

37 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Goals Your values affect the goals you setgoals Short-term goals may be achieved in a day or a weekShort-term goals Long-term goals may take a year or several years to accomplishLong-term goals You often need to reach short-term goals in order to accomplish long-term goals

38 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Priorities You must meet your top priorities before you meet other goalspriorities Your values may affect the way you prioritize your goals The more values you have that relate to a goal, the better your chances are of reaching that goal

39 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Standards Standards are a means of measuring how well you achieve your goalsStandards Everyone has different standards Many standards come from family Some standards are based on scientific knowledge

40 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Think Further What standards do you use to help you judge how well you have met your goals? © Maridav/Shutterstock

41 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-3 Review Strong beliefs and ideas about what is important are called _____. values Define short-term goals and long-term goals. short-term goals are what you plan to get done soon; long-term goals may take a year or several years to achieve continued

42 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-3 Review What are top priorities? your most important goals _____ are a means of measuring how well you achieve your goals. Standards

43 Section 3-4 Your Decisions

44 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objectives Define decision, ethics, ethical decision making, decision-making process, alternatives, and trade-off. Describe how to make an ethical decision. Apply the decision-making process.

45 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Decisions You make many decisions every day, but some are more important than othersdecisions You are responsible for the consequences of your decisions Adults may guide you with decisions, but cannot always be with you You need to learn to make good decisions for yourself

46 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Ethics Ethics is thinking about why something is right or wrong, or good or badEthics continued © GG Pro Photo/Shutterstock

47 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Ethics You can practice ethical decision making by considering the following questions:ethical decision making –Will your decision help or hurt others? –What would a responsible person do? –Is your decision consistent with your values? –Would you want others to know about your decision?

48 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. The Decision-Making Process The decision-making process is a set of six basic steps to help youdecision-making process –make decisions –solve problems –reach goals continued © Andrey Burmakin/Shutterstock

49 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. The Decision-Making Process Steps in the Decision-Making Process Step 1: Define the problem. Step 2: Examine the alternatives. Step 3: Consider how choices relate to goals. Step 4: Identify acceptable choices. Step 5: Decide on one choice. Step 6: Evaluate results. continued

50 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. The Decision-Making Process A problem may include a decision you need to make or a goal you need to reach When making decisions, list the advantages and disadvantages of your alternativesalternatives To identify acceptable choices, carefully consider all your options and how they relate to your needs, goals, and values continued

51 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. The Decision-Making Process When deciding on a choice, you may need to make a trade-off –A trade-off is the giving up of one thing for anothertrade-off You should always evaluate your decision to help avoid repeating an unwise decision

52 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Contributing to Group Decisions You are part of a group in –each of your classes –after-school programs such as scout troops, sports teams, band, or youth groups –student organizations such as Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) continued

53 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Contributing to Group Decisions By taking part in class discussions, you are able to –find out what others are thinking and feeling –express your thoughts and feelings –better understand your decisions about various issues continued

54 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Did You Know? FCCLA uses a five-step planning process to reach group decisions and goals. FCCLA

55 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Contributing to Group Decisions Any group can use the decision-making and planning processes Group decisions can be harder to make than personal decisions –Different ideas based on needs, wants, values, goals, priorities, and standards –Conflict about what is the best decision continued

56 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Contributing to Group Decisions When making group decisions, –gather and examine information carefully –discuss topics when you know the facts Group decision-making skills you learn now will help you in the future

57 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Think Further How can learning group decision- making skills help you in your community? on the job? © Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock

58 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-4 Review A choice you make about what to do or say in a given situation is called a(n) _____. decision What is ethical decision making? applying ideas of right or wrong to specific situations continued

59 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-4 Review List the steps in the decision-making process. define the problem, examine alternatives, consider how choices relate to goals, identify acceptable choices, decide on one choice, evaluate results What is the last step of the FCCLA planning process? evaluate results

60 Section 3-5 Making a Difference in Your Community

61 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Objectives Define leadership, integrity, teamwork, citizenship, civic engagement, service learning, and social entrepreneur. Explain qualities of effective leaders and strong team members. Describe ways to contribute to your community through civic engagement, service learning, and social entrepreneurship.

62 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Being a Leader and a Team Member Leadership is the ability to inspire others to meet goalsLeadership Leaders –value the needs and interests of others –set examples for others to follow –guide group decisions –exhibit certain qualities, such as integrityintegrity continued

63 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Being a Leader and a Team Member continued Qualities of Effective Leaders Are knowledgeable about group issues. Have courage to do what is needed. Have friendly, caring personalities. Are organized. Have good time management skills. Are enthusiastic and can motivate group members.

64 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Being a Leader and a Team Member Teamwork is work done by a group in a cooperative mannerTeamwork Effective team members –listen to others in the group –respect different points of view –have a positive attitude –are honest and fair –demonstrate tact

65 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Giving to the Community As a citizen, or a member of a community, you have responsibilitiescitizen The way you handle those responsibilities is known as citizenshipcitizenship Responsible citizens search for ways to make improvements in their communities continued

66 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Giving to the Community Civic engagement includes the actions that individuals and groups take to identify and solve the problems of their communitiesCivic engagement © Lisa F. Young/Shutterstock

67 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Service Learning Service learning is a strategy where students use their academic skills to provide services for their communityService learning When the project is finished, students reflect or think about what they learned Doing meaningful projects can be positive experiences for students and communities

68 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Think Further What service learning project could your class do to meet a need in your community? © mangostock/Shutterstock

69 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Social Entrepreneur Social entrepreneurs identify the problems of societies and develop plans to change the world in positive waysSocial entrepreneurs They use their skills to organize projects that will address the problems There are many examples of social entrepreneurs continued

70 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Social Entrepreneur Examples of Social Entrepreneurs Florence Nightingale established the first school for nurses and fought to improve hospital conditions. John Muir established the National Park System. Ellen Swallow Richards founded the first school lunch program to address nutritional needs. Professor Muhammad Yunus founded microcredit. Zach Hunter founded Loose Change to Loosen Chains (LC2LC).

71 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-5 Review Work done by a group in a cooperative manner is called _____. teamwork Define the term citizenship. the ways in which citizens handle their responsibilities continued

72 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Section 3-5 Review The actions that individuals and groups take to identify and solve the problems of their communities is called _____. (two words) civic engagement Define the term service learning. a strategy where students use their academic skills to provide services for their community

73 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary alternatives. Options available to choose from when making a decision. (3-4) citizen. A member of a community. (3-5) citizenship. The ways in which citizens handle their responsibilities. (3-5) civic engagement. Actions that individuals and groups take to identify and solve the problems of their communities. (3-5)

74 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary community resources. Resources shared by everyone and paid for through taxes. (3-2) decision. A choice you make about what to do or say in a given situation. (3-4) decision-making process. A set of six basic steps to help you make decisions, solve problems, or reach goals. (3-4)

75 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary ethical decision making. Applying ideas of right or wrong to specific situations. (3-4) ethics. Your strong beliefs about right and wrong that guide your conduct. (3-4) goals. What you want to achieve. (3-3) human resources. The qualities and traits people have within themselves to get what they need or want. (3-2)

76 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary integrity. A commitment to do what is right. (3-5) leadership. The ability to inspire others to meet goals. (3-5) long-term goals. What you hope to accomplish at a later date. (3-3) needs. The basic items you must have to live. (3-1)

77 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary nonhuman resources. Objects and conditions available to people to help them meet needs and fulfill wants. (3-2) priorities. Goals that are more important to you. (3-3) private resources. Resources owned and controlled by a person or a family. (3-2)

78 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary resources. Assets that can be used to meet needs and fulfill wants. (3-1) scarce. A resource that is limited in supply. (3-2) service learning. A strategy where students use their academic skills to provide services for their community. (3-5)

79 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary short-term goals. What you plan to get done soon. (3-3) social entrepreneurs. Individuals who identify the problems of societies and develop plans to change the world in positive ways. (3-5) standards. A means of measuring how well you achieve your goals. (3-3)

80 Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Glossary teamwork. Work done by a group in a cooperative manner. (3-5) trade-off. The giving up of one thing for another. (3-4) values. Strong beliefs or ideas about what is important. (3-3) wants. The extra items you would like to have, but are not necessary to live. (3-1)


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