Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Can you guess the missing words? --------- is a political and economic system. ---------- believe that everyone should have the same opportunities. There.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Can you guess the missing words? --------- is a political and economic system. ---------- believe that everyone should have the same opportunities. There."— Presentation transcript:

1 Can you guess the missing words? is a political and economic system believe that everyone should have the same opportunities. There are no rich or poor people in countries. Communism, communists, communist Copy this paragraph out into your books.

2

3 Aims: 1. to understand the key ideology and give principles of communism. 2. To be able to give examples of a communist way of living.

4 Questions to write in books QuestionsIdeas 1. Why are people in Libya fighting for the right to vote? 2. Why are you at school when 60 years ago youd be sent off to work? 3. Why do many married women work when 40 years ago they wouldnt have? 4. Whatever happened to the cavalry brigade? 5. Why does Ashley Cole play for England? 6. What will the Olympics leave behind?

5 Source 1: Human Rights In Libya From Wikipedia From 1969 to 2011, the history of Libya was marked by the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (where Jamahiriya means "state of the masses"), a so-called "direct democracy" political system established by Muammar Gaddafi, who nominally stepped down from power in 1977, but remained an unofficial "Brother Leader" until Under the Jamahiriya, the country's literacy rate rose to 90%, and welfare systems were introduced that allowed access to free education, free healthcare, and financial assistance for housing. In 2008, the General People's Congress has declared the Great Green Charter of Human Rights of the Jamahiriyan Era. The Great Manmade River was also built to allow free access to fresh water across large parts of the country. In addition, illiteracy and homelessness had been "almost wiped out," and financial support was provided for university scholarships and employment programs, while the nation as a whole remained debt-free. As a result, Libya's Human Development Index in 2010 was the highest in Africa and greater than that of Saudi Arabia.

6 Source 2: Factories during industrial times. From WikiAnswers. When families all lived on the farm, everyone helped with the farm work. When people moved to the city, every person in the family did what they could to add to the family income. Children worked in factories because the machines were powered by water wheels and if something on the machine broke they would not just stop all the machines for that one machine to be fixed. Because of this they needed people with small hands to reach in and fix the machines so the employers usually only hired women and children because men often had larger hands. Also children could be manipulated into accepting low wages. ( They would work for pennies a day).

7 Source 3: The women who choose not to be mothers From BBC News We've come a long way, baby. Until a few decades ago, it was widely assumed that a woman would marry and, soon after, the stork would arrive with a special delivery. Today, there are many more choices - or more openness. To have a baby out of wedlock. To have a baby without a father. To have a baby and return to work. To have a baby and give up work. To have fertility treatment, and then a baby (or not). But what about not becoming a mother at all? Studies in the UK, Europe and the United States show this is now the choice of significant numbers of women. Once this was considered insane or unnatural. Even today, it is viewed with suspicion - women with no desire to procreate say they sometimes face awkward questions and disapproval. "A woman at work was recently quite shocked by my saying I didn't want children. She said: 'You're a woman, you were born with a womb, God gave a womb so we could procreate'," Jenny Woolfson, aged 25, told BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour.

8 Source 4: Charge of the Light Brigade From Wikipedia The brigade was not completely destroyed, but did suffer terribly, with 118 men killed, 127 wounded and about 60 taken prisoner. After regrouping, only 195 men were still with horses. The futility of the action and its reckless bravery prompted the French Marshal Pierre Bosquet to state "C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas la guerre." ("It is magnificent, but it is not war.") He continued, in a rarely quoted phrase: "C'est de la folie" "it is madness." The Russian commanders are said to have initially believed that the British soldiers must have been drunk Somerset Calthorpe, ADC to Lord Raglan, wrote a letter to a friend three days after the charge. He detailed casualty numbers, but he did not make distinction between those killed and those taken prisoner: "Killed and missing.Wounded. 9Officers12 14Sergeants [ sic ]9 4Trumpeters3 129Rank and file98 156Total casualties; besides 335 horses killed in action, or obliged afterwards to be destroyed from wounds. It has since been ascertained that the Russians made a good many prisoners; the exact number is not yet known."

9 Source 5: Ashley Cole From Chelsea FC Name:Ashley Cole Nationality:English Date of Birth:20/12/1980 Height:5' 9" (176cm) Weight:10st 6lbs (66.0kg) Previous Clubs:Crystal Palace (loan), Arsenal Position: Defender Chelsea career Now in his sixth season at the club, Ashley Cole was a 2006 summer deadline day signing from Arsenal, to whom we paid £5 million plus William Gallas, and he made his debut against Werder Bremen in September that year. A fabulous athlete who loves to go forward, he admitted at that season's end that Blues fans had yet to see him at his very best, a series of injures having hindered the settling process. Competition with Wayne Bridge for the left-back slot had ended with a roughly even share of games. An ankle operation in the summer cleared the way for an uninhibited start to the 2007/08 campaign and with Bridge injured, Ashley got off to a flyer and enjoy the lion's share of matches that season, particularly for the big encounters. His first Chelsea goal was lashed in away at West Ham in March 2008, and after surviving an injury scare in training on the eve of the Champions League Final, he recovered to put in one of the best displays on the night, including a successful shoot-out penalty.

10 Source 6: What Will Be The Legacy of the London 2012? The Guardian London was supposed to be the Games that would touch the parts other Olympics couldn't reach. Lord Coe's electrifying speech in Singapore that secured the Games set the tone – this would be an Olympics that would deliver not only a fantastic sporting spectacle but leave behind a legacy for east London, the UK and the world. It vowed to inspire a generation through sport, regenerate the poorest part of the capital, get the entire country off their sofas and into the pool or the gym and leave behind a framework for elite sport that would ensure we never again plumbed the depths of Atlanta or Athens. World peace wasn't on the list but it might as well have been. Added to that since have been all sorts of other legacy goals around shifting perceptions of disability, cultural aims and sustainability. Some have been well realised, others less so. Such was the need to sell the £9.3bn public investment to taxpayers that they were promised the moon on a stick. The dreaded "L-word" has become such a cliché that organisers and ministers turn verbal somersaults to try and avoid using it. To this observer, the physical legacy rising out of the earth in Stratford can't help but impress – in bricks and mortar terms at least. Leaving aside for now the issues surrounding regeneration (ably outlined by Dave Hill here) the so-called sporting legacy can be broadly divided into what it means for elite sport, the venues and for mass participation.

11 The communist society… Bosses own the factories. They want to make a big profit so…They pay workers low wages, who then have very low money, so…Eventually the workers will seize power themselves, and…The workers will then share all the wealth out fairly so…In a communist society, everyone will have enough.

12

13 The best idea is that women are equal to men because women are just as good as each other and they truly deserve to be treated the same.

14 The worst idea is that rich people have all their money taken away because rich people especially have had to work extremely hard for their money and its not fair that it should be taken away.

15

16 A Christian priest A Christian priest might be scared of communism because they have to be loyal to God and the pope. In a communist society; there is no religion.

17 Owner of a newspaper The owner of a newspaper might be scared of communism happening in Britain because they might get closed down and lose all their money.

18 History teacher A history teacher might be scared of communism because they would have to have the same teaching style and teach the same thing as everyone else.

19 Explain your answer. Remember…

20 History NC Levels Level 6 Pupils show their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by beginning to analyse the nature and extent of diversity, change and continuity within and across different periods. They begin to explain relationships between causes. They begin to explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen or been constructed. They explore criteria for making judgements about the historical significance of events, people and changes. They investigate historical problems and issues, asking and beginning to refine their own questions. They evaluate sources to establish relevant evidence for particular enquiries. They select, organise and deploy relevant information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to produce structured work. Level 7 Pupils show their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by analysing historical change and continuity, diversity and causation. They explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen or been constructed. They begin to explain how the significance of events, people and changes has varied according to different perspectives. They investigate historical problems and issues, asking and refining their own questions and beginning to reflect on he process undertaken. When establishing the evidence for a particular enquiry, pupils consider critically issues surrounding the origin, nature and purpose of sources. They select, organise and use relevant information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to produce well-structured work. Level 8 Pupils show their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history, constructing substantiated analyses about historical change and continuity, diversity and causation. They analyse and explain a range of historical interpretations and different judgements about historical significance. They suggest lines of enquiry into historical problems and issues, refining their methods of investigation. They evaluate critically a range of sources and reach substantiated conclusions independently. They use historical terminology confidently, reflecting on the way in which terms can change meaning according to context. They produce precise and coherent work. Exceptional performance Pupils show a confident and extensive knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history. They use this to frame and pursue enquiries about historical change and continuity, diversity and causation, constructing well-substantiated, analytic arguments within a wide frame of historical reference. They analyse links between events and developments that took place in different countries and in different periods. When exploring historical interpretations and judgements about significance, pupils construct convincing and substantiated arguments and evaluations based on their understanding of the historical context. They evaluate critically a wide range of sources, reaching substantiated conclusions independently. They use historical terminology confidently, reflectively and critically. They consistently produce precise and coherent narratives, descriptions and explanations.


Download ppt "Can you guess the missing words? --------- is a political and economic system. ---------- believe that everyone should have the same opportunities. There."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google