Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

L ECTURE 3 Media Audiences in the digital age. ACADEMIC RESEARCH Optimistic: More information leads to:- Empowerment Greater choice of information Improve.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "L ECTURE 3 Media Audiences in the digital age. ACADEMIC RESEARCH Optimistic: More information leads to:- Empowerment Greater choice of information Improve."— Presentation transcript:

1 L ECTURE 3 Media Audiences in the digital age

2 ACADEMIC RESEARCH Optimistic: More information leads to:- Empowerment Greater choice of information Improve knowledge Strengthen grass roots democracy

3 ACADEMIC RESEARCH Pessimistic People being entertained to death Mindlessly watching TV for hour after hour Content has dumbed down Content may influence people in negative ways Even if there is more choice, there is a scarcity of attention

4 S OME ACADEMIC AREAS OF CONCERN AND DISAGREEMENT ABOUT AUDIENCES There is/is not some kind of good/bad influence of the news media on people The quality of news reporting is improving/declining Attention/interest in news is declining/increasing People are active or passive viewers People are news media consumers or citizens

5 I NDUSTRY RESEARCH Almost always quantitative – counting sales, viewers, clicks… Measures size of audience – sales and readership, demographics, time spent reading or viewing Information gathered is then targeted at advertisers, competitors and news media marketing

6 T OP NEWS WEBSITES IN THE US WebsiteMonthly visitors – 000s CNN29,837 Yahoo! News37,240 Digg33,432 New York Times14,709 USA Today18,531 BBC News7,863 Reuters6,447 Washington Post8,347 Google Newsn/a Huffington Post4,658 Fox News8,437 LA Times6,726 Guardian.co.uk3,033 Times Online2,674 MSNBC2,840

7 H ITWISE R EPORT ON NEWS MEDIA USE IN THE UK RANKED BY VISITS FOR THE WEEK ENDING 19 F EB 2010 BBC News16.35% BBC Homepage14.53% BBC Weather Centre 3.60% Sky News 3.2% Yahoo! UK and Ireland 2.50% Daily Mail 2.10% The Sun 1.81% Google News UK 1.72% Telegraph 1.72% Times Online 1.62%

8 C ONSUMPTION OF ONLINE NEWS SUPPLIED BY BROADCASTERS The BBC had developed an impressive web presence using the licence fee It is the only UK media organisation to feature in the UKs top 10 web domains 200 individual websites, attract 12 million UK users and 33 overseas users

9 A VERAGE LENGTH OF VISIT TO A NEWS WEBSITE Daily Mail 8.7 minutes Guardian5.4 minutes News of the World3.7 minutes The Sun 3.7 minutes The Times3.3 minutes (McKinsey (2008) Reshaping Publishers for Digital, based on surveys in UK, France, German, Italy and Spain).

10 ATTEMPTS TO UNDERSTAND AUDIENCES Industry:- This is about getting people to watch, use your product Academic:- influence, harm, benefit

11 PROBLEM: N EWS CONSUMPTION HABITS ARE CHANGING The internet accounts for 23% of media time spent by Europeans each year – and is seen to be a threat by old media and news providers TV accounts for 31% of media time Radio accounts for 28% of media time Newspapers 10% of media time Magazines 8% of media time

12 PROBLEM: DO AUDIENCES STILL BUY INTO THE JOURNALIST AS THE AUTHORITY FIGURE ? Alan Rusbridger, Editor of the Guardian talks about a tension.. Between a world in which journalists considered themselves – and were perhaps considered by others – special figures of authority. Journalists had the information and the access and news media audiences didnt.

13 N EWS AND T RADITIONAL B ROADCAST N EWS O RGANISATIONS Audiences may appear to be self-selecting, naturally occurring formations, but they are not. They are targeted and produced by media institutions. But today audiences are ambient, more platform promiscuous and may want to articulate their own views

14 PROBLEM The goal of winning new audiences to old platforms using the Web to lure people to television programs or print generally is not working. Younger audiences, it turns out, are interested in news. But they want it from new platforms that can deliver it in new ways and on their new terms.

15 PROBLEM: R ADIO The audience is increasing and fragmenting. The growing question is which, if any, of the new audio platforms will emerge as more significant, or whether the universe of audio will become more and more fragmented. satellite radio Internet radio, HD radio, podcasts, MP3/iPod Cell phone radio

16 PROBLEM Audiences are getting used to the idea of being able to go straight to the information that's important to them. Those audiences don't need to read newspapers front to back; nor do they need to spend hours reading through a single news website. News websites compete not with punchy headlines but with metadata designed to optimise search results, with search engines recently graduating to the role of news aggregators.

17 PROBLEM: NEW ENTRANTS G OOGLE NEWS Google News doesn't write, produce or broadcast news Google News doesn't write, produce or broadcast news It collates news stories from various websites, making it easier for the reader get a snapshot. It collates news stories from various websites, making it easier for the reader get a snapshot. It's what audiences want nowadays; what they expect. That's a form of flat knowledge It's what audiences want nowadays; what they expect. That's a form of flat knowledge Kevin Marsh, BBC College of Journalism

18 INDUSTRY: U NDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE BETTER T YPES OF A UDIENCES 2007 (M C K INSEY S /R EUTERS P ROFILES UK POPULATION ) CITIZEN ENTHUSIASTS Feel a responsibility to know what is happening in the world news makes them feel connected Go to multiple sources Broad and deep consumption Enjoy the ritual of keeping up with the news

19 INDUSTRY: U NDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE BETTER T YPES OF A UDIENCES 2007 (M C K INSEY S /R EUTERS P ROFILES UK POPULATION ) A FEW MAIN SOURCES Highly sceptical about bias, so trust few sources Most news from TV and then radio (not online) Do not feel time-pressured

20 INDUSTRY: U NDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE BETTER T YPES OF A UDIENCES 2007 (M C K INSEY S /R EUTERS P ROFILES UK POPULATION ) SCEPTICAL SURFERS Most sceptical about bias and accuracy Rely on multiple sources Like frequent updates of online news Dont need news to feel connected or intelligent Disengaged from newspapers

21 INDUSTRY: U NDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE BETTER T YPES OF A UDIENCES 2007 (M C K INSEY S /R EUTERS P ROFILES UK POPULATION ) NEWS LOVERS Heavily engaged in news Rely on TV and online heavily Trusting, dont think sources are biased Reduced breadth of reading Enjoy sources with in-depth analysis Dont feel a responsibility to keep up with the news

22 INDUSTRY: U NDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE BETTER T YPES OF A UDIENCES 2007 (M C K INSEY S /R EUTERS P ROFILES UK POPULATION ) TRADITIONALISTS Enjoy the ritual of reading a newspaper Do not feel a responsibility to keep up with the news Do not like online news

23 INDUSTRY: U NDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE BETTER T YPES OF A UDIENCES 2007 (M C K INSEY S /R EUTERS P ROFILES UK POPULATION ) HEADLINERS Like to skim headlines from a few sources More interested in facts only, not deep analysis Find news depressing Time pressured Like the efficiency of online sources

24 INDUSTRY: U NDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE BETTER T YPES OF A UDIENCES 2007 (M C K INSEY S /R EUTERS P ROFILES UK POPULATION ) RELUCTANT ABSORBERS Feel the need to keep up with the news but dont enjoy it Reject online sources Prefer to be spoon-fed rather than having to make up their own mind

25 INDUSTRY: U NDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE BETTER T YPES OF A UDIENCES 2007 (M C K INSEY S /R EUTERS P ROFILES UK POPULATION ) REJECTERS Actively reject the news Find it boring/depressing Dont have time Reject online news sources

26 N UMBERS (57% OF THE POPULATION ) Citizen Enthusiasts4.4 million Sceptical Surfers2.8 million News Lovers4.0 million Traditionalists3.6 million A Few Main Sources3.2 million Headliners3.1 million Reluctant absorbers3.0 million Rejecters2.5 million

27 In a crowded marketplace the on-air look is much more important than ever because you are looking for that point of difference. Companies may be reining back on how much they spend on news coverage, but in a very crowded market they are very aware that they cant skimp on packaging. Rob Beynon, Chief Executive of DMA Media (a news consultancy firm)

28 I NDUSTRY RESPONSES :- CHANGE THE LOOK AND FEEL OF YOUR NEWS PROGRAMME Brand and re-brand their product, Change the music, logos, programme style, presentation style, presenters etc.

29 N EWS FASHIONS : COME AND GO Male or female presenter only Male and younger female presenter together Flashy studio, or newsroom backdrop Flashy graphics and new idents Sofas Cosy chats with the weather presenter, formal presentations, serious and light-hearted moments Dramatic large screens, small screens The presenter walks around, stands up, sits down, shuffles paper, or only uses hi-tech etc. etc.

30 T HE BBC B RAND MID -1990 S

31 ITN P RESENTATION In the late 1990s an original ITN logo from the 1970s was brought back into use and the familiar shot of Big Ben and the 'bongs' were used for all its programmes. Our belief was that a news programme should communicate honesty, transparency and plain dealing...

32 B IG B EN USED IN MANY SHOTS : SYMBOLISES AUTHORITY, POWER, CONTINUITY …

33 ITV E VENING N EWS

34 F ROM 2000 STUDIO SETS HAVE BEEN RESTYLED AND MADE EVEN MORE VISUALLY INTERESTING

35 ITV S T HEATRE OF N EWS FOR ITS 2004 RELAUNCH

36 J ANUARY 2008 R E - LAUNCH OF N EWS AT T EN ; MORE TRADITIONAL

37 F ASHIONS I want to get away from the chilly, macho technology of news and bring back the human being, which is why were calling the news programme Five News with Natasha Kaplinsky Chris Shaw, February 2008

38 I NDUSTRY RESPONSES :- CHANGE THE LOOK AND FEEL OF YOUR NEWS PROGRAMME the BBC recently launch new-look idents for BBC News on Monday with a mantra that seems to be based on the idea of "let there be light". A straw poll of MediaGuardian.co.uk staff on their first impressions of the new idents drew remarks that the central globe looked a bit like a "giant beach ball" or perhaps "an orange being re- peeled". http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/organgrinder/2 008/apr/16/thebbcisgearingup

39 G RAPHICS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YI8_DDEuswk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNSqQbD70Ms &feature=related http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNSqQbD70Ms &feature=related http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jY13zDH0HDA &feature=related http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jY13zDH0HDA &feature=related http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7VhPSOa6rg &feature=related http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7VhPSOa6rg &feature=related

40 PROMOS http://tvnewsroom.co. uk/itv/itv-news/itv- news-promo-been- there/

41 INDUSTRY: TALK ABOUT THE END OF NEWS SCENARIO News isn't about news anymore. It's about predictions, speculations, recap, taking a look at tomorrow's papers or yesterday's papers, possibly even last Thursday's papers. We, as consumers of continuous news, surf the infinite choice of networks, pressing the button immediately an item loses our interest, desperate for something to hold our interest, moving on as soon as we are bored. Flattening out of knowledge – people go to many places

42 C HARLIE B ROOKER : N EWSWIPE Reviews the news as though it were an entertainment show TV news now comes packaged as a dazzling CGI cartoon, with the names of star anchors included in the programme title, and an absurdly theatrical air of bombast underpinning every second of every broadcast.

43 I N BROOKER S COMEDIC SHOW For him, the news seems to consist solely of Financial apocalypse, celebrity illness, terrorism, and spree killings. They may as well replace Sky News with a channel called Abyss 24; a dark, bottomless chasm for the viewer to stare into. Although it might prove hard to sell advertising space

44 CHARLIE BROOKERS OBSERVATIONS Things I've learned from watching the news 'If it bleeds, it leads It's a cliche, but a depressingly accurate one. On the day thousands of people took to the streets of Northern Ireland to denounce violence, their efforts were shunted down the news menu by a lone German maniac's random shooting spree. Bad news wins.

45 C ONCLUSIONS News agendas are being determined by audience habits and broadcasters desire to attract audiences/media users to programmes and online services does this change what is news? are news values (more celebrity, sensational stories etc…) changing along with news styles? why is TV news so easy to satirise?


Download ppt "L ECTURE 3 Media Audiences in the digital age. ACADEMIC RESEARCH Optimistic: More information leads to:- Empowerment Greater choice of information Improve."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google