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Dietary Guidelines for

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Presentation on theme: "Dietary Guidelines for"— Presentation transcript:

1 Dietary Guidelines for
Americans, 2010: Quiz Yourself!

2 Alice Henneman, MS, RD University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension
Food.unl.edu ● This publication has been peer-reviewed ● March 2011

3 “Thank you” to the following people (in alphabetical order) for reviewing these slides!
Mary Balluff Donnia Behrends Jessie Coffey Lisa Franzen-Castle Rita Frickel Betty Kenyon Jobeth Kuchar Toni Kuehneman Rebecca Meysenburg Roberta Miksch Melissa Patterson Amy Peterson Cindy Polich Natalie Sehi Amy Stalp Cindy Van Riper Vicki Jedlicka Jan Wadell Michelle Welch

4 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 will be referred to as DGA2010 throughout the slide set

5 The terms “Solid Fats and Added Sugars” and “SoFAs” will be used interchangeably throughout the slide set

6 Note to presenters This slide set was created with PowerPoint 2007– it may view differently in other versions It takes 20 to 30 minutes to go through the slide set – more time if you discuss in detail The intended audience is professionals and consumers who want to know some of the changes in the DGA2010 in relation to the general adult population See “speaker’s notes” accompanying each slide for suggested comments on the DGA2010 Reformat slightly before showing if anything doesn’t display correctly on your computer A customized template was developed for this PowerPoint – major additions or changes in wording/slides may result in unanticipated effects

7 Resources used Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 Selected Messages for Consumers DGA2010 Slide Presentation SlidePresentation.htm

8 What do you know about the DGA2010? And, how they can help you?

9 A quiz!

10 Several new areas and emphases will be identified throughout the presentation
Several changes have been made in the DGA2010. These will be identified as we go along. For additional changes in the DGA2010, refer to the resources given at the beginning of this slide set.

11 Keys areas covered 1. Introduction 2. Balancing calories
4. Foods to increase 3. Foods to reduce Here is what we’ll be covering today from the DGA2010.

12 What are the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010?
1. Introduction What are the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010?

13 The DGA2010 are intended for:
Healthy Americans 2 years and older Americans at increased risk of chronic disease 2 years and older Both A and B

14 The DGA2010 are intended for:
Healthy Americans 2 years and older Americans at increased risk of chronic disease 2 years and older Both A and B Answer: C. Both A and B. Children under 2 years of age are not included because their nutritional needs and eating patterns differ substantially from those of older children and adults. 

15 Including individuals at increased
risk of chronic disease This is the first time the DGA2010 included individuals who were at increased risk of chronic disease.

16 Epidemic of overweight and obesity
64% of women 72% of men The DGA2010 recommendations traditionally have been intended for healthy Americans 2 years and older. However, the 2010 guidelines are being released at a time of rising concern about the health of Americans and have been expanded to include those at increased risk of chronic disease. Thus, the DGA2010 were developed to address the concerns of both groups. Poor diet and physical inactivity are the most important factors contributing to an epidemic of overweight and obesity affecting men, women, and children in all segments of our society. The most recent data indicate 72% of men and 64% of women are overweight or obese, with about one-third of adults being obese.

17 Epidemic of overweight and obesity in all segments of our society
Stressing an epidemic of overweight and obesity in all segments of our society also is a first.

18 Poor diet and physical inactivity are associated with which diseases?
Cardiovascular disease Hypertension Type 2 diabetes Osteoporosis Some types of cancer A, B, C, D All of the above

19 Poor diet and physical inactivity are associated with which diseases?
Cardiovascular disease Hypertension Type 2 diabetes Osteoporosis Some types of cancer A, B, C, D All of the above Answer: G. All of the above.

20 These are diseases that have a diet-related component.

21 Physical activity and diet are important regardless of weight!
Attaining a desirable weight isn’t enough to be healthy if you didn’t following a healthy diet and physical activity to attain it.

22 This chart shows how far below 100% we are of eating whole grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy, seafood, and oils foods. And how short of the goal we are in consuming fiber, potassium, vitamin D, and calcium.

23 This chart shows how we are way over recommended limits for calories from Solid Fats and Added Sugars (SoFAS), refined grains, sodium and saturated fat!

24 The DGA2010 help you meet these food and nutrient goals and limits

25 But, tomorrow will probably come! How healthy will you be?
You can live as if there’s no tomorrow ... Most of us will probably live a long life, but without being healthy, it may not be as enjoyable. And, our life may be accompanied by costly medical bills! But, tomorrow will probably come! How healthy will you be?

26 “If I’d known I was going to live so long, I’d have taken better care of myself.” 
~Leon Eldred Avoid being like this man!

27 Calorie balance over time is key
2.Balancing calories Calorie balance over time is key

28 Maintain calorie balance over time to achieve and sustain a healthy weight
This is a new overarching concept throughout the DGA2010.

29 The BEST way to assess if you’re eating the right number of calories is:
Check calorie tables in DGA2010; select level based on age, gender, height, weight, & physical activity Monitor body weight; adjust calorie intake & participation in physical activity based on weight changes over time

30 The BEST way to assess if you’re eating the right number of calories is:
Check calorie tables in DGA2010; select level based on age, gender, height, weight, & physical activity Monitor body weight; adjust calorie intake & participation in physical activity based on weight changes over time Answer: B. Knowing one’s daily calorie needs from a calorie table based on age, gender, height, weight and level of physical activity may be a useful reference point in determining the calories a person eats and drinks are appropriate in relation to the number needed daily. However, monitoring whether you maintain your weight over time by adjusting calories and physical activity is the most helpful.

31 100 extra calories 10 extra pounds per day per year!
It doesn’t take many extra calories a day to add 10 pounds a year! The good news is by reducing daily calorie intake by 100 calories, you can lose 10 pounds per year.

32 100 extra calories per day 10 extra pounds per year!

33 Eat until “satisfied,” not “full”
“Your stomach shouldn’t be a waist (waste) basket.”  ~ Author Unknown Eat only until you are satisfied, not full. If you tend to overeat, be aware of the time of day, place and your mood while eating so you can better control the amount you eat.

34 20 minute guideline 20 minutes
Takes about 20 minutes for stomach to tell your brain you’re full Slow down to slim down!

35 Eat smaller portions The bigger the portion, the more people tend to eat Research indicates the larger the portion, the more we tend to eat. Take less. Serve on smaller plates. Use narrow vs. wide glasses. Order a smaller portion. Split with a friend. Ask for a to-go-box right away and put half the meal away so you can’t see it. Review the calorie content of foods and beverages offered and choose lower-calorie options. Calorie information may be available on menus, in a pamphlet, on food wrappers, or online.

36 “You better cut the pizza in four pieces, because I’m not hungry enough to eat six.” ~Yogi Berra

37 Whole grains & weight control
Moderate evidence shows that adults who eat more whole grains, particularly those higher in dietary fiber, have a lower body weight compared to adults who eat fewer whole grains.

38 Fruits, veggies, & weight control
Moderate evidence in adults and limited evidence in children and adolescents suggests increased intake of vegetables and/or fruits may protect against weight gain.

39 How much WEEKLY physical activity should adults (age 18 and over) do for substantial health benefits? 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensive activity (i.e. 30 minutes, 5 times/week) 1 hour and 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity (i.e. 15 minutes, 5 times/week) Either A or B

40 How much WEEKLY physical activity should adults (age 18 and over) do for substantial health benefits? 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensive activity (i.e. 30 minutes, 5 times/week) 1 hour and 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity (i.e. 15 minutes, 5 times/week) Either A or B Answer: C. Either option or an equivalent combination of the two options is acceptable. Aerobic activity should be performed in episodes of at least 10 minutes, and preferably, it should be spread throughout the week. For additional and more extensive health benefits, adults should increase their aerobic physical activity to 300 minutes (5 hours) a week of moderate-intensity, or 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity. Additional health benefits are gained by engaging in physical activity beyond this amount. Adults also should include muscle-strengthening activities that involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week.

41 “My idea of exercise is a good brisk sit.” ~ Phyllis Diller
NOT!

42 Moderate aerobic activity increases breathing and heart rate somewhat
Moderate activity is aerobic activity that increases a person’s breathing and heart rate somewhat. It includes brisk walking, dancing, swimming, or bicycling on a level terrain.

43 Vigorous aerobic activity greatly increases heart rate and breathing
Examples of vigorous intensity activity that greatly increases a person’s heart rate and breathing include jogging, singles tennis, swimming continuous laps, or bicycling uphill.

44 Limit screen time or watch/workout
Are there ways you can workout while you watch TV? Peddle on an exercise bicycle? Walk on a treadmill? Etc.

45 Get active 10 minutes 3 times a day
Short on time? Get active 10 minutes 3 times a day Walk during a break, over the noon hour, while waiting for a load of laundry to get done, after dinner, etc.

46 Which foods should you eat less of in your diet?
3. Foods to reduce Which foods should you eat less of in your diet?

47 The DGA2010 recommend we eat LESS:
Sodium Solid fats Added sugars Refined grains All of the above

48 The DGA2010 recommend we eat LESS:
Sodium Solid fats Added sugars Refined grains All of the above Answer: E. All of these are associated with an unhealthy eating pattern. Rather, a healthy eating pattern emphasizes nutrient-dense foods and beverages.

49 The following 2 slides are for illustration only ̶
in real life, raw meat would NOT be placed next to foods that would be eaten uncooked

50 Limit foods high in sodium, added sugars, and refined grains
Photo courtesy of National Cancer Institute

51 Eat more nutrient- dense foods
Photo courtesy of National Cancer Institute Eat more nutrient- dense foods

52 Another name for “nutrient-dense” foods is “nutrient-rich” foods

53 When prepared WITHOUT adding solid fats, sugars, or salt
Nutrient-dense foods and beverages include ALL: Vegetables/fruits Whole grains Seafood Eggs Dry beans/peas Unsalted nuts/seeds Fat-free/low-fat milk/milk products Lean meats/poultry When prepared WITHOUT adding solid fats, sugars, or salt

54 Focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods and beverages
This is a new overarching concept throughout the DGA2010.

55 Comparing calories in nutrient-dense foods vs. non nutrient-dense foods
This figure illustrates the concept of nutrient-dense foods comparing a baked form of chicken with a breaded and fried form. Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies 4.1.

56 Comparing calories in nutrient-dense foods vs. non nutrient-dense foods
This slide illustrates the added calories from added sugar. Source: Based on data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies 4.1.

57 Comparing calories in nutrient-dense foods vs. not nutrient-dense foods
This figure illustrates the concept of nutrient-dense foods comparing a leaner form of meat with a form containing more fat. Source: Based on data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies 4.1.

58 Avoid Solid Fats and Added Sugars (SoFAS)
Avoiding sitting or laying on a sofa too much, is a good idea, too!

59 Calories from solid fats and added sugars
This is the first time SoFAS have been specifically mentioned in the Dietary Guidelines.

60 What is the average proportion of calories Americans consume daily from solid fats and added sugars?
20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

61 What is the average proportion of calories Americans consume daily from solid fats and added sugars?
20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Answer: D. Americans consume approximately 35% or nearly 800 calories per day of solid fats and sugars (often referred to as SoFAS) which do little to contribute to the overall nutrient adequacy of the diet. Foods containing SoFAS are no more likely to contribute to weight gain than any other source of calories in an eating pattern within calorie limits. However, as the amount of SoFAS increases, it becomes more difficult to also eat foods with sufficient dietary fiber and essential vitamins and minerals and stay within calorie limits. For most people, no more than about 5 to 15 percent of calories from SOFAS can be reasonably included in their dietary pattern.

62 SoFAS provide few nutrients Most people should limit SoFAS to:
Current SoFAS: Most people should limit SoFAS to: 35% of calories 5 to 15% of calories 800 calories 100 to 300 calories Based on a 2,000 calorie diet Intake of SoFAS replaces nutrient-dense foods, and makes it very difficult to achieve recommended nutrient levels. 100 to 300 calories isn’t very much. As an example, a tablespoon of white sugar adds about 45 calories and a tablespoon of a solid fat adds about 100 calories. 100 to 300 calories isn’t very much!

63 Reducing sodium

64 While some foods are extremely high in sodium, the problem of excess sodium reflects frequent consumption of foods that are only moderately high in sodium, such as yeast breads. This makes it very difficult for even the most dedicated consumer to meet even the 2300 mg recommendation. (Graph based NHANES data)

65 Approximately how much of our sodium comes from processed foods?
45% 55% 65% 75%

66 Approximately how much of our sodium comes from processed foods?
45% 55% 65% 75% Answer: D. 75%

67 How much sodium is in a teaspoon of salt?
1,300 mg 2,300 mg 3,300 mg

68 How much sodium is in a teaspoon of salt?
1,300 mg 2,300 mg 3,300 mg Answer: B. 2,300 mg

69 What is the approximate average daily sodium intake for persons age 2 and up in the United States?
800 mg 1,500 mg 2,300 mg 3,400 mg

70 What is the approximate average daily sodium intake for persons age 2 and up in the United States?
800 mg 1,500 mg 2,300 mg 3,400 mg Answer: D. The average daily sodium intake for age 2 and up is 3,436 mg. This amount equals about 1.5 teaspoons of salt per day.

71 DGA2010 recommend people ages 2 and older reduce daily sodium intake to less than:
2,300 mg or 1,500 mg, depending on age/other individual characteristics 2,300 mg or 3,000 mg, depending on age/other individual characteristics

72 DGA2010 recommend people ages 2 and older reduce daily sodium intake to less than:
2,300 mg or 1,500 mg, depending on age/other individual characteristics 2,300 mg or 3,000 mg, depending on age/other individual characteristics Answer: A. 2,300 mg or 1,500 mg, depending on age/other individual characteristics

73 Ages 2+ Groups reduced to 1,500 mg African Americans ages 2+
Adults ages 51+ People ages 2+ with high blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease Ages 2+ The 1500 mg recommendation applies to half the total population (ages 2+) and to the majority of adults.

74 Based on this Nutrition Facts Label, how much sodium is in 1 cup?
30 mg 250 mg 470 mg

75 Based on this Nutrition Facts Label, how much sodium is in 1 cup?
30 mg 250 mg 470 mg Answer: C. 470 mg.

76 Know the serving size YOU ate!
When reading nutrition labels, it is important to check the amount of sodium in the serving size you are consuming. For example, if you ate 1.5 cups of this food, you would consume 705 mg.

77 Using the food label You’ll find recommendations to use the food label throughout the DGA2010 to help you choose a healthy diet.

78 Can foods be high in salt without tasting salty?
Yes No

79 Can foods be high in salt without tasting salty?
Yes No Answer: A.

80 Even sweet foods may be higher in sodium than you think!
Check food labels! Even sweet foods may be higher in sodium than you think! Check the Nutrition Facts Label!

81 Easy ways to reduce sodium
Check labels Avoid adding salt (an exception may be when baking yeast breads) Eat fresh foods, frozen veggies Request salt be left off when eating out Use other seasonings NOTE: Salt is typically used in yeast breads and other bread-type products made with yeast to regulate the growth of the yeast and prevent the food from rising too rapidly. While yeast breads can be made without salt, modifications in the ingredients and recipe techniques are usually made to create a product with a satisfactory texture. As salt also adds flavor, most bread is still made with salt.

82 Reducing solid fats

83 Photo courtesy of National Cancer Institute/Bill Branson
All sources of fats and oils are composed of 3 types of fatty acids in varying proportions Photo courtesy of National Cancer Institute/Bill Branson

84 ← Saturated fatty acids → ← Polyunsaturated fatty acids →
Common solid fats Common oils ← Saturated fatty acids → ← Polyunsaturated fatty acids → ← Monounsaturated fatty acids → This chart illustrates how various fats and oils are combinations of the different saturated acids, only in varying amounts. Source of chart: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Nutrient Data Laboratory. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 22, Available at bhnrc/ndl. Accessed July 19, 2010.

85 This chart illustrates the major food sources of saturated fatty acids in the American diet, and illustrates why the Guidelines emphasize fat-free and low fat dairy products and lean meats and poultry. (Graph based NHANES data)

86 Regarding fats, which is more important in influencing risk of cardiovascular (heart) disease?
The types of fatty acids consumed The total amount of fat in the diet They are equally important

87 The types of fatty acids consumed The total amount of fat in the diet
Regarding fats, which is more important in influencing risk of cardiovascular (heart) disease? The types of fatty acids consumed The total amount of fat in the diet They are equally important Answer: A. The types of fatty acids consumed is the most important. A strong body of evidence indicates higher intake of most dietary saturated fatty acids is associated with higher levels of blood total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, both of which are risk factors for heart disease. To reduce the intake of saturated fatty acids, many Americans should limit their consumption of the major food sources high in saturated fatty acids and replace them with foods rich in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

88 Which of the following is TRUE?
Canola, olive and safflower oils are rich in monounsaturated fatty acids Soybean, corn, and cottonseed oils are good sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids Most animal fats, coconut oil, palm kernel oil, and palm oil are high in saturated fatty acids All of them are true

89 Which of the following is TRUE?
Canola, olive and safflower oils are rich in monounsaturated fatty acids Soybean, corn, and cottonseed oils are good sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids Most animal fats, coconut oil, palm kernel oil, and palm oil are high in saturated fatty acids All of them are true Answer: D. All of them are true. Most animal fats tend to have a higher proportion of saturated fatty acids. Saturated fats tend to be solid at room temperature. Plant foods tend to have a higher proportion of monounsaturated and/or polyunsaturated fatty acids with coconut oil, palm kernel oil, and palm oil being the exceptions.

90 Fish are an exception to animal fats being high in saturated fats
Photo courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fish are an exception to animal fats being high in saturated fats. Fish are high in unsaturated fatty acids. Fish couldn’t swim if they were high in saturated fats — they would be as stiff as a board! These salmon would be stiff as a board and couldn’t swim if high in saturated fats!

91 How much UNSATURATED fat?
Total fat (12g) Subtract Saturated fat (3g) Equals Unsaturated fat (9g) If there are 12g of total fat and 3g of saturated fat, how much unsaturated fat is there? ANSWER: 9g. Listing monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats isn’t mandatory. To find the amount of unsaturated fat in a food, subtract the saturated fat from the total fat. In this food, you would have 9 grams of unsaturated fat. However, as it contains trans fat, you might still limit the amount you include in your diet.

92 Which of the following statements about “trans” fatty acids is FALSE?
They lower LDL cholesterol Form when liquid unsaturated fatty acids are hydrogenated to make them solid at room temperature Listing trans fatty acids amount is mandatory on Nutrition Facts Label People should keep trans fatty acids intake as low as possible

93 Which of the following statements about “trans” fatty acids is FALSE?
They lower LDL cholesterol Form when liquid unsaturated fatty acids are hydrogenated to make them solid at room temperature Listing trans fatty acids amount is mandatory on Nutrition Facts Label People should keep trans fatty acids intake as low as possible Answer: A. Trans fatty acids raise LDL cholesterol, which is the type of cholesterol associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Check the Nutrition Facts Label for the presence of trans fatty acids in foods.

94 Effect of cholesterol is small compared to saturated and trans fats

95 Check nutrition labels for trans fats
Keep your intake of trans fats as low as possible. Even if food label states 0 grams, it may have up to 0.49 grams, so if you eat more than one serving, you may be getting more trans fat than you thought. Look for hydrogenated oil in ingredients list.

96 Reducing sugar

97 As a percent of calories from total added sugars, the major sources of added sugars in the diets of Americans are soda, energy drinks, and sports drinks (36% of added sugar intake), grain-based desserts (13%), sugar-sweetened fruit drinks (10%), dairy-based desserts (6%), and candy (6%). (Graph based NHANES data)

98 Drink fewer sugar-sweetened beverages
Strong evidence shows children and adolescents who consume more sugar-sweetened beverages have higher body weight compared to those who drink less, and moderate evidence also supports this relationship in adults. Sugar-sweetened beverages provide excess calories and few essential nutrients to the diet and should only be consumed when nutrient needs have been met and without exceeding daily calorie limits. Reduce the intake of sugary drinks by: drinking fewer sugar-sweetened beverages, consuming smaller portions, substituting water and other beverages with few or no calories for sugar-sweetened beverages. Substitute water and other beverages with few or no calories

99 Select fruit for dessert
Select fruit for dessert. Eat less of high-calorie desserts.

100 Nutrition Facts Label doesn’t separate “added” & “naturally occurring” sugars
“Added” sugars are sugars and syrups added to foods or beverages during preparation or processing 1 teaspoon sugar = about 4g Sometimes when people see the word “sugar” on the Nutrition Facts Label of a food that has “naturally occurring” sugar, such as milk or fruit, they may feel they shouldn’t eat it. However, unless a person had to monitor total carbohydrate, it is the “added” sugars that are the concern of the DGA2010.

101 Some sugars occur “naturally” in foods like milk and fruit and aren’t the “added sugars” that are the concern of the DGA2010

102 Which food has ADDED sugar according to the ingredient list?
INGREDIENTS: cultured pasteurized grade A nonfat milk, whey protein concentrate, pectin ... INGREDIENTS: cultured grade A reduced fat milk, apples, high- fructose corn syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, natural flavors, pectin ...

103 Which food has ADDED sugar according to the ingredient list?
INGREDIENTS: cultured pasteurized grade A nonfat milk, whey protein concentrate, pectin ... INGREDIENTS: cultured grade A reduced fat milk, apples, high- fructose corn syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, natural flavors, pectin ... Answer: B. If you are uncertain whether the sugar shown on the Nutrition Facts Label is “added” or “naturally occurring,” check the list of ingredients. Look for such words as syrup, sugar, honey, molasses, dextrin, and words ending on “ose” (such as dextrose, fructose, lactose, maltose, sucrose).

104 Reducing refined grains

105 …includes pizza, grain-based desserts, tortillas, burritos, tacos, pasta and pasta dishes, rice and rice mixed dishes Over one fourth of all refined grains consumed are from yeast breads, rolls, and bagels. These items and many other foods have whole grain counterparts in the marketplace that can readily be selected by consumers. (Graph based NHANES data)

106 How many of your total grains should be whole grains?
1/4 1/3 1/2 3/4

107 How many of your total grains should be whole grains?
1/4 1/3 1/2 3/4 C. One half of your grain servings should be whole grains. Enriched refined grain products provide some vitamins and minerals, but not the fiber provided by whole grains.

108 Limit consumption of refined grains, especially those that contain solid fats, added sugars, and sodium

109 Foods that are important to include more of in your diet
4. Foods to increase Foods that are important to include more of in your diet

110 Based on the DGA2010, which foods should Americans INCREASE?
Whole grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Seafood Oils All of them should be increased

111 Based on the DGA2010, which foods should Americans INCREASE?
Whole grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Seafood Oils All of them should be increased Answer: G. All should be increased. To improve their diets, Americans need to eat more of the following food groups in nutrient-dense forms: vegetables; fruits; whole grains; and milk. The total amount of protein foods Americans eat is adequate on average; but within that food group, seafood should be consumed in greater amounts, and meat and poultry in smaller amounts. Oils should be used to replace solid fats when possible.

112 Which bread contains WHOLE grains
INGREDIENTS: wheat flour, water, high fructose corn syrup, molasses, wheat, bran ... INGREDIENTS: whole wheat flour, water, brown sugar ...

113 Which bread contains WHOLE grains
INGREDIENTS: wheat flour, water, high fructose corn syrup, molasses, wheat, bran ... INGREDIENTS: whole wheat flour, water, brown sugar ... Answer: B. The whole grain should be the first ingredient or the second ingredient, after water. For foods with multiple whole-grain ingredients, they should appear near the beginning of the ingredients list.

114 Can a grain product be high in fiber and low in whole grains?
Yes No

115 Can a grain product be high in fiber and low in whole grains?
Yes No Answer: A. Yes. A grain product could have added bran (which is an excellent source of fiber) but is not a whole grain and would not contain all the nutrients found in whole grains.

116 Bran Endosperm Germ Whole grains contain the entire grain seed or “kernel” Whole grains include the entire grain seed, usually called the kernel. The kernel consists of three components—the bran, germ, and endosperm. If the kernel has been cracked, crushed, or flaked, then, to be called a “whole grain” a food must retain the same relative proportions of these components as they exist in the intact grain. Whole grains are consumed either as a single food (e.g., wild rice or popcorn) or as an ingredient in foods (e.g., in cereals, breads, and crackers). Some examples of whole-grain ingredients include buckwheat, bulgur, millet, oatmeal, quinoa, rolled oats, brown or wild rice, whole-grain barley, whole rye, and whole wheat.

117 51% of total weight as whole grains OR
Partially whole grain products providing half or more whole grains per ounce- equivalent serving have at least either: 51% of total weight as whole grains OR 8g of whole grains The Whole Grain Stamp, while not mandatory, is found on many products containing whole grains and is another way to help you choose whole grain products. Foods with this Stamp guarantee the product contains at least half a serving (8g) of whole grains per serving. Inside the Stamp is a declaration of the grams of whole grains per serving for the particular food. Here is how the Whole Grains Council describes this Stamp (retrieved March 2, 2011 at There are two different varieties of stamp, the Basic Stamp and the 100% Stamp. - If a product bears the 100% Stamp, then all its grain ingredients are whole grains. There is a minimum requirement of 16g (16 grams) — a full serving — of whole grain per labeled serving, for products using the 100% Stamp. - If a product bears the Basic Stamp, it contains at least 8g (8 grams) — a half serving — of whole grain, but may also contain some refined grain. Even if a product contains large amounts of whole grain (23g, 37g, 41g, etc.), it will use the Basic Stamp if it also contains extra bran, germ, or refined flour.

118 3 ways to eat half whole grains
(2) 2 oz. of 100% whole grains, 2 oz. of partly whole-grain products, and 2 oz. of refined grain products (1) 3 oz. of 100% whole grains and 3 oz. of refined-grain products (3) 6 oz. of partly whole-grain products This slide shows an example of a explanatory graphic from the DGA2010 Guidelines. The actual Guideline for whole grains is “consume at least half of your grains as whole grains,” and this figure shows 3 different ways of how someone could choose to make half of their total grain intake whole grain, using bread as an example.

119 Approximately how many cups of fruits and vegetables per day are recommended for adults (at the 2,000 calorie level)? 1 cup fruits, 1-1/2 cups vegetables 1-1/2 cups fruits, 2 cups vegetables 2 cups fruits, 2-1/2 cups vegetables 2-1/2 cups fruits, 3 cups vegetables

120 Approximately how many cups of fruits and vegetables per day are recommended for adults (at the 2,000 calorie level)? 1 cup fruits, 1-1/2 cups vegetables 1-1/2 cups fruits, 2 cups vegetables 2 cups fruits, 2-1/2 cups vegetables 2-1/2 cups fruits, 3 cups vegetables Answer: C.

121 Make half your plate fruits & vegetables
Divide the other half between a lean protein source and a whole grain.

122 What type of food are “beans and peas (legumes)” considered?
Vegetable Protein Both A and B Neither A or B

123 What type of food are “beans and peas (legumes)” considered?
Vegetable Protein Both A and B Neither A or B Answer C. Both A and B. The DGA2010 vegetable subgroup of “beans and peas (legumes)” refers to the mature forms of legumes. It includes kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), lima beans, black-eyed peas, split peas, and lentils. They contain protein and other nutrients similar to seafood, meat, and poultry. Plus, they are excellent sources fiber and other nutrients which also are found in vegetables. Green peas and green (string) beans are not considered part of the “beans and peas (legumes)” subgroup.

124 All cooked beans and peas — for example:
The DGA2010 vegetable subgroup of “beans and peas (legumes)” includes ... All cooked beans and peas — for example: Kidney beans Lentils Chickpeas Pinto beans 124

125 They’re in different vegetable subgroups
The vegetable subgroup of “beans and peas (legumes)” does NOT include ... Green peas Green beans Green peas are in the “Starchy Vegetables” vegetable subgroup. Green beans are in the “Other Vegetables” vegetable subgroup. They’re in different vegetable subgroups 125

126 Red & orange Starchy Beans & peas (legumes) Dark-green Other
Pick a variety of vegetables from each of the DGA2010 vegetable subgroups Starchy Red & orange Beans & peas (legumes) Dark-green Formerly the Dietary Guidelines included an orange vegetable subgroup. In 2010, they added red foods and now refer to a red-orange subgroup, to include tomatoes, because of the tomato’s nutritive value and the extent to which it occurs in American diets. Tomatoes are high in the antioxidant lycopene. They also are a significant source of vitamin C, fiber and potassium. Examples of food from the five vegetable subgroups include: Dark-green vegetables: All fresh, frozen, and canned dark-green leafy vegetables and broccoli, cooked or raw: for example, broccoli; spinach; romaine; collard, turnip, and mustard greens. Red and orange vegetables: All fresh, frozen, and canned red and orange vegetables, cooked or raw: for example, tomatoes, red peppers, carrots, sweet potatoes, winter squash, and pumpkin. Beans and peas (legumes): All cooked beans and peas: for example, kidney beans, lentils, chickpeas, and pinto beans. Does not include green beans or green peas. (See additional comment under protein foods group.) Starchy vegetables: All fresh, frozen, and canned starchy vegetables: for example, white potatoes, corn, green peas. Other vegetables: All fresh, frozen, and canned other vegetables, cooked or raw: for example, iceberg lettuce, green beans, and onions. Other 126

127 Which is more nutrient-dense?
Fat-free and low fat (1%) milk Whole milk They are equally nutrient-dense

128 Which is more nutrient-dense?
Fat-free and low fat (1%) milk Whole milk They are equally nutrient-dense Answer: A. Increase your intake of fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk and milk products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese, or fortified soy beverages. If you are drinking whole milk, gradually switch to lower fat options. If you are drinking whole milk, go to 2% and move on down to 1% low-fat or fat-free milk. Lower fat milk provides the same nutrients as higher fat milk, but is lower in calories and saturated fat while still providing essential nutrients (calcium, protein, etc.).

129 Whole 2% 1% Fat-free 165 calories 125 calories 100 calories
Calories saved 40 65 80 Choosing fat-free or1% low-fat milk and milk products provides the same nutrients with less solid fat and thus fewer calories. Soy beverages fortified with calcium and A and D are considered part of the milk and milk products group because they are similar to milk both nutritionally and in their use in meals.

130 “Milk” group is now called “Dairy Products” Fortified soy beverages included (often marketed as “soymilk,” a product name consumers could see in the supermarket) NOTE: According the DGA2010 document: Fortified soy beverages have been marketed as “soymilk,” a product name consumers could see in supermarkets and consumer materials. However, FDA’s regulations do not contain provisions for the use of the term soymilk. Therefore, in this document (the DGA2010), the term “fortified soy beverage” includes products that may be marketed as soymilk. Source:

131 How much seafood is recommended weekly by the DGA2010?
3 ounces 4 ounces 6 ounces 8 ounces

132 How much seafood is recommended weekly by the DGA2010?
3 ounces 4 ounces 6 ounces 8 ounces D. 8 ounces. Consistent with the new recommendation for seafood, the amount of seafood in all patterns for adults was increased to at least 8 ounces per week. The total amount of protein foods remained constant, and the amounts of meat and poultry were decreased to accommodate the seafood recommendation.

133 Eat seafood in place of some meat and poultry

134 “Meat & Beans” group is now called “Protein Foods”
If you eat cooked dry beans and peas, you can count either as coming from the vegetable group or the protein group. However, you can’t count them in both groups at the same time!

135 Which of these seafoods are high in omega-3 fatty acids?
Atlantic mackerel Pacific mackerel Salmon Anchovies Herring Sardines Pacific oysters Trout They are all high in omega-3’s

136 Which of these seafoods are high in omega-3 fatty acids?
Atlantic mackerel Pacific mackerel Salmon Anchovies Herring Sardines Pacific oysters Trout They are all high in omega-3’s Answer: I. They are all high in omega-3 fatty acids and should be eaten more often. An exception: A fish that contains omega-3 fatty acids that should be LIMITED is the King Mackerel fish because of its high mercury content.

137 Omega-3 fatty acid and mercury content in seafood
Seafood choices can include those with higher and lower amounts of Omega-3 fatty acids, but some choices with higher amounts should be included.

138 Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding should NOT eat:
Tilefish Shark Swordfish King mackerel All of the above

139 Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding should NOT eat:
Tilefish Shark Swordfish King mackerel All of the above Answer: E. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not eat four types of fish because they are high in methyl mercury. These are tilefish, shark, swordfish, and king mackerel. They can eat all types of tuna, including white (albacore) and light canned tuna, but should limit white tuna to 6 ounces per week because it is higher in methyl mercury.

140 “The greatest wealth is health.” ~Virgil
THE END “The greatest wealth is health.” ~Virgil

141 Extension is a Division of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln cooperating with the Counties and the United States Department of Agriculture. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension educational programs abide with the nondiscrimination policies of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and the United States Department of Agriculture.


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