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11 Foreign Agricultural Service Programming for Fiscal Year 2009 As Presented by Members of the Office of Capacity Building and Development Foreign Agricultural.

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Presentation on theme: "11 Foreign Agricultural Service Programming for Fiscal Year 2009 As Presented by Members of the Office of Capacity Building and Development Foreign Agricultural."— Presentation transcript:

1 11 Foreign Agricultural Service Programming for Fiscal Year 2009 As Presented by Members of the Office of Capacity Building and Development Foreign Agricultural Service U.S. Department of Agriculture Monday, April 14, 2008

2 22 Introductions and Agenda Welcome Ron Croushorn, Director, Food Assistance Division USDAs Development Strategy Pat Sheikh, Deputy Administrator, Office of Capacity Building and Development Program Overview Babette Gainor, Deputy Director, Food Assistance Division Fiscal Year 2009 Food for Progress Debbie Pfaff, Senior Analyst, Food for Development Fiscal Year 2009 Food for Education Cristina Fundeneanu, Acting Branch Chief, School Feeding and Humanitarian Assistance Evaluating Food Aid Programs Brenda Freeman, Director, Monitoring and Evaluation Staff Questions and Answers

3 3 USDAs Development Strategy Presented by Patricia Sheikh, Deputy Administrator, Office of Capacity Building and Development, Foreign Agricultural Service

4 4 Role of the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) in Development Primarily responsible for USDAs international activities Support trade-capacity building and creating new markets Provide food aid and technical assistance to foreign countries Help increase income and food availability in developing nations

5 5 Key Strategic Changes in FAS Greater emphasis on: Trade negotiations Enforcement of trade agreements Management of bilateral relationships Trade-capacity building Special emphasis on sanitary and phytosanitary issues Shift from implementing individual projects to supporting and coordinating international activities throughout USDA

6 6 Legislative and Public Affairs Civil Rights Staff PolicyProgramsOperations New FAS Structure

7 Office of the Deputy Administrator Capacity Building and Development Food Assistance Trade and Scientific Capacity Building Trade and Scientific Exchanges Policy Coordination and Planning Staff Monitoring and Evaluation Staff Food for Development School Feeding and Humanitarian Assistance Transportation and Logistics Rural Develop- ment and Natural Resources Post-Conflict and Disaster Assistance Science and Technology Capacity Building Regulatory and Policy Capacity Building Scientific Exchanges Cochran Fellowship Program Development Resources and Disaster Assistance Office of Capacity Building and Development (OCBD) Agricultural Market Systems

8 8 OCBD Mission OCBD advances international agricultural trade and U.S. national security by strengthening the institutions and economies of developing countries through trade capacity building and agricultural development Lebanon

9 9 Our Approach OCBD brings many tools into one area, creating an integrated approach Our activities allow us to play an enhanced role in meeting U.S. national security objectives Reconstruction and stabilization will continue to be a part of the international landscape Working to rebuild weakened states helps address U.S. security concerns Honduras

10 10 Food Assistance Division Food assistance is often the first step in meeting humanitarian and development needs USDA assistance focuses on nutrition, agricultural development, and education FAS Administrator Michael Yost visiting a school in East Africa

11 11 Program Overview Presented by Babette Gainor, Deputy Director, Food Assistance Division, OCBD

12 12 FY 2008 Programming Food for Progress (Title I) Food for Progress (CCC) Food for Education TOTALS Number of Agreements Tons (thousands) Total Value ($ millions)$0.0$155.9$100.0$255.9

13 13 Farm Bill Reauthorization of programs Anticipated budgets Food for Education: $100 million Food for Progress: $40 million for transportation Commodity and freight prices Food aid quality USDA/USAID funded project Potential changes in regulations Important Issues for FY 2009

14 14 Overall Program Elements Program timeline Applying for the programs Guidelines Program complements Multi-year agreements

15 15 Timeline for USDA Food Assistance Programs ACTIONFY 2009 FOOD FOR PROGRESS FY 2009 and FY2010 FOOD FOR EDUCATION Announce solicitation period KC Conference, April 2008 KC Conference, April 2008 Deadline for ProposalsAugust 1, 2008 Reconfirm FY 2010 Priority countries KC Conference, 2009 and Announce solicitation for FY 2010 KC Conference, 2009

16 16 Proposal Submissions Apply online at: Follow program guidance Provide a proposal rating if multiple proposals are submitted

17 17 Program Management Timely reporting Refocusing of resources on servicing and monitoring implementation of agreements Increased use of multi-year agreements with enhanced flexibility Customer service 17

18 18 Food Aid Development Training Training sessions will begin in late May 2008 Training topics will include: Proposal writing and agreement negotiations Food aid commodity facts Shipping guidelines Program implementation Closeout procedures Dates for the training will be announced at the end of April 2008, via the food aid website -

19 19 Submit Food Aid Success Stories Via the FAS Website

20 20 Food for Progress Presented by Debbie Pfaff, Senior Analyst, Food for Development Branch Food Assistance Division, OCBD

21 21 Overview Resources Priority countries Proposal review Food for Progress Bolivia

22 22 Food for Progress Act of 1985 Targets developing countries and emerging democracies Supports democracy and expansion of private enterprise in the agricultural sector Food for Progress Jamaica

23 23 Most agreements are implemented with PVOs and foreign governments Commodities are usually monetized Commodities are also used for: Barter Food for work Direct distribution Food for Progress Burkina Faso

24 24 Food for Progress Projects Primary emphasis is agricultural development Soil and water conservation Improved farming methods Agricultural extension Animal and plant health Processing, storage and marketing Roads and other infrastructure Cooperative development Micro-credit and business training Armenia

25 25 Policy-related activities: Promote science-based sanitary and phytosanitary standards Trade-capacity building Improve market channels Complementary activities: HIV/AIDS awareness Nutrition training Land mine removal Food for Progress Mozambique

26 26 Food for Progress FY 2008 Proposals 104 Received 95 PVOs 3 UN World Food Program 6 governments 36 countries Total value $1.08 billion 13 Approved (as of 4/04/08) One government and 12 PVO programs approved Total value $129 million

27 27 Food for Progress – FY 2009 Expected Resources $40 million cap on transportation costs $35 million available for new FY 09 awards No restriction on commodity cost $15 million for administrative costs No new P.L. 480, Title I funding

28 28 Food for Progress Active and New Agreements CountryCooperating Sponsor Date Initiated (signed year) Estimated Completion Year AfghanistanMercy Corps International Fertilizer Development Center Mercy Corps Government of Afghanistan Government of Afghanistan Government of Afghanistan ArmeniaWorld Food Program World Food Program Armenian Technology Group Inc United Methodist Committee on Relief AzerbaijanVishnevskaya-Rostropovich Foundation

29 29 Food for Progress Active Agreements – Continued CountryCooperating Sponsor Date Initiated (signed year ) Estimated Completion Year BoliviaGovernment of Bolivia Project Concern International Food for the Hungry, Inc Project Concern International CameroonGovernment of Cameroon Government of Cameroon Central African Republic International Partnership for Human Development, Inc Democratic Republic of the Congo South-East Consortium for International Development United Methodist Committee on Relief Dominican RepublicNational Rural Electric Cooperative Association

30 30 Food for Progress Active Agreements - Continued CountryCooperating Sponsor Date Initiated (signed year) Estimated Completion Year EcuadorGovernment of Ecuador Government of Ecuador El SalvadorGovernment of El Salvador Government of El Salvador EthiopiaGovernment of Ethiopia ACDI/VOCA GeorgiaUnited Methodist Committee on Relief International Relief and Development

31 31 Food for Progress Active Agreements - Continued CountryCooperating Sponsor Date Initiated (signed year) Estimated Completion Year GuatemalaGovernment of Guatemala FINCA International The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Government of Guatemala Texas A&M University HondurasZamorano School Government of Honduras TechnoServe TechnoServe Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere Government of Honduras TechnoServe

32 32 Food for Progress Active Agreements - Continued CountryCooperating Sponsor Date Initiated (signed year) Estimated Completion Year IraqU.S. Grains Council JamaicaFood for the Poor, Inc KenyaTechnoServe Land O' Lakes, Inc World Council of Credit Unions, Inc LebanonGovernment of Lebanon LiberiaVisions in Action ACDI/VOCA Mercy Corps/Visions in Action MadagascarGovernment of Madagascar Land O' Lakes, Inc Catholic Relief Services MalawiPlanet Aid, Inc

33 33 Food for Progress Active Agreements - Continued CountryCooperating Sponsor Date Initiated (signed year) Estimated Completion Year MaliAga Khan Foundation U.S.A Government of Mali MauritaniaGovernment of Mauritania MongoliaMercy Corps World Vision, Inc Mercy Corps/Cooperative Housing Foundation MozambiqueGovernment of Mozambique TechnoServe TechnoServe Planet Aid, Inc Government of Mozambique Land O' Lakes, Inc

34 34 Food for Progress Active Agreements - Continued CountryCooperating Sponsor Date Initiated (signed year) Estimated Completion Year NicaraguaWorld Food Program Government of Nicaragua World Food Program FINCA International, Inc Project Concern International NigerCatholic Relief Service International Relief and Development Government of Niger International Relief and Development NigeriaPartners for Development PakistanGovernment of Pakistan Government of Pakistan

35 35 Food for Progress Active Agreements - Continued CountryCooperating Sponsor Date Initiated (signed year) Estimated Completion Year PhilippinesGovernment of Philippines Land O' Lakes, Inc ACDI/VOCA Republic of the Congo International Partnership for Human Development, Inc SenegalCounterpart International Sri LankaWorld Vision, Inc World Council of Credit Unions, Inc Humpty Dumpty Institute TanzaniaFINCA International, Inc Partners for Development UgandaLand O' Lakes, Inc FINCA International, Inc YemenGovernment of Yemen

36 36 Priority Country Determination Per capita incomes below $3,595 (World Bank) and population > 1,000,000 Net food importer with > 20% of the population undernourished (FAO) Positive movement in political rights or civil liberties (Freedom House) USDA Post coverage and ability to monitor agreements No concerns with security, market, or capacity issues

37 37 Food for Progress Priority Country Determination Other Factors Considered Countries added (within two points of malnutrition cut-off): Philippines Uganda

38 38 22 Food for Progress Countries Meeting All Criteria/Other Factors Afghanistan Bangladesh Bolivia Dominican Republic Ethiopia Guatemala Honduras Kenya Liberia Madagascar Malawi Mali Mongolia Mozambique Namibia Nicaragua Niger Philippines Senegal Tanzania Uganda Yemen

39 39 Two-Year Priority Country Lists USDA reviewed the list of priority countries and divided it over two years to provide: More focused priorities for both USDA and applicants Activity within agreement portfolio Countries with less activity in FY 2009 list Countries that received programs in FY 2007 & FY 2008 moved to FY 2010 Facilitates longer-term planning for PVOs

40 40 Food for Progress Priority Countries for Solicitation in FY 2009 Afghanistan Bangladesh Dominican Republic Ethiopia Malawi Mali Namibia Philippines Senegal Uganda Yemen

41 Food for Progress Priority Countries* Afghanistan Bolivia Guatemala Honduras Kenya Liberia Madagascar Mongolia Mozambique Nicaragua Niger Tanzania *subject to change

42 42 Proposal Review Criteria Agricultural focus (30%) Commodity management and appropriateness (20%) Organizational capability and related experience (20%) Proposal quality (15%) Ability to quantify program impact (15%)

43 43 Key Sections of Proposals It is essential that all sections be clear and complete, but especially these: Introductory statement Section 5(a) – Activity objectives Section 5(b) – Method of choosing beneficiaries Section 5(h) – Criteria for measuring progress Section 6(e) – Uses of sales proceeds

44 44 Food for Progress Targeting And Proposal Impact ActivityType and Number of Beneficiaries Intended Output Intended Outcome* New Production Technology 300 farmers 50 businesses Two monthly training sessions 20 percent increase in yields; 30 percent increase in income * Baseline data to be provided during agreement negotiation

45 45 Food for Progress Common Proposal Weaknesses Limited agricultural focus Objectives and program implementation not clearly defined Weak progress measures/outcomes High cost per beneficiary compared to outcomes Lack of coordination with Embassy/Government Commodity/monetization issues Proposal is incomplete, inconsistent or does not follow format

46 46 Food for Progress Jamaica Bolivia

47 47 Food for Education Presented by Cristina Fundeneanu, Acting Branch Chief, School Feeding & Humanitarian Branch, Food Assistance Division, OCBD

48 48 Food for Education Overview Resources Priority countries Proposal review Guinea Bissau

49 49 Supports education, child development, and food security Targets low-income and food-deficit countries Encourages health and nutrition complements Strives for sustainability Food for Education Senegal

50 50 FY 2008 Program Awards 67 proposals received; valued at $1.8 B 11 proposals funded; valued at $48 M Four new programs 10 multi-year agreements Albania

51 51 Available Resources $100 million requested in Presidents budget in FY 2009 $70 million committed in multi-year agreements in FY 2009 $45 million committed in FY 2010

52 52 Food for Education Active Agreements 33 active agreements currently funded with 19 cooperating sponsors, in 28 countries, with more than 3 million beneficiaries

53 53 Food for Education Active Agreements - Continued

54 54 Priority Country Determination Per capita incomes below $3,595 (World Bank) and population > 1,000,000 Net food importer with > 20% of the population undernourished (FAO) < 75% literacy rate of total population (UNESCO) Government commitment to education USDA Post coverage and ability to monitor agreements No concerns with security, market, or capacity issues

55 55 FY 2009 and FY 2010 Food for Education Priority Countries Afghanistan Angola Bangladesh Cambodia Cameroon Chad Ethiopia Guatemala Guinea Guinea Bissau Kenya Laos Liberia Madagascar Malawi Mali Mozambique Niger Pakistan Rwanda Senegal Sierra Leone Tanzania Uganda Yemen

56 56 Approval of Proposals in FY 2009 and FY 2010 Continuation of existing programs will receive highest priority in FY 2009 Limited funds will remain after these programs are funded Remaining proposals will be considered for FY 2010 funding

57 57 Proposal Review Criteria Proposal quality (38%) Organizational capability and experience (20%) Commodity or funding appropriateness (15%) Ability to quantify program impact and need for program clearly expressed (12%) Graduation/sustainability, coordination with other programs and local government and NGO support for program (15%)

58 58 Proposal Impact/Results FAS will evaluate the outputs, outcomes and graduation/sustainability plan is clearly described in the proposal. At a minimum, each proposal must provide the number of beneficiaries targeted and the impact of the program on those beneficiaries. Proposals that contain clear measurable indicators (Section 5h) will be more competitive.

59 59 Key Sections of Proposals It is essential that the following sections be clear and complete: Introductory statement Section 5(a) - Activity objectives Section 5(b) - Method of choosing beneficiaries Section 5(h) - Criteria for measuring progress

60 60 Things To Remember in Writing An Effective Proposal Possible substitutes for the commodities requested Monetization or barter are well justified The program is well targeted to appropriate regions Detailed and realistic progress indicators are used Contribution of other donors are encouraged Program sustainability plan is outlined Government commitment is sought

61 Monitoring and Evaluation Presented by Brenda Freeman, Director, Monitoring and Evaluation Staff, OCBD 61

62 62 Monitoring and Evaluation Staff Brenda Freeman, Director – Delphine Hamlin, Senior Analyst – Liliana Bachelder, PVO Lead– Angella Greaves, G-G Lead – Lita Echiverri, Program Analyst – Shane Townsend, Program Asst. – Gary Groves – On detail

63 63 Role of Monitoring and Evaluation Staff Administer the closeout of food aid agreements Conduct mid-term review of food aid programs to assess their impact Evaluate the effectiveness of OCBD technical assistance programs

64 64 Status of Gov to Gov Food Aid Agreement Closeouts Number of Open & Active Agreements 12 Number of Agreements Open & Pending Closure 7 Number of Agreements Closed 48

65 65 Status of Pre-FY 2002 PVO Agreement Closeouts Number of Open & Active Agreements 95 Number of Agreements Open & Pending Closure 21 Number of Agreements Closed 74

66 66 Closeout Requirements Important items you need to submit: Final cumulative Logmon report Final cumulative financial report All proceeds and interest accounted for All other relevant reports, audit (A-133); program evaluations and project status reports List of equipment purchased for over $5,000 with USDA funds and your plan for disposal A final, Indirect Cost Rate Note: Please see the FAS homepage for the Closeout Checklist for a list of these requirements

67 67 Closeout Time Lines First priority was to closeout pre-2002 agreements The next tranche of agreements for closure are those signed in FY 2002 to FY 2004 Agreements signed in FY 2005 and forward are expected to be closed within days of your request for closure combined with your submission of all required documentation

68 68 Closeout Submission Process PVO submits all closeout documents to FAD, not to M&ES M&ES is notified by FAD that you have requested closure of your agreement M&ES receives closeout documentation from FAD submitted by PVO M&ES conducts an analysis of submitted documents and consults with PVO, as necessary M&ES prepares and sends closeout letter to PVO

69 69 Evaluation Plans for 2009 M&ES will look at programs with the following components: Consortium Agreements, where 2 or more PVOs are party to one agreement with USDA and work in collaboration towards a common objective in the same country Monetization programs, to learn of and share best practices Microcredit programs

70 70 Questions


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